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Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)


September 1999 - North Korea Special Weapons News

  • NORTH KOREAN 'MISSILE MORATORIUM': CAUTIOUS OPTIMISM IN SEOUL USIA Foreign Media Reaction Report 30 September 1999 -- North Korea's announcement on Sept. 24 that it would suspend missile tests as long as talks with the U.S. continue elicited a cautiously positive response in Seoul, but Tokyo papers remained skeptical. Observers in South Korea expected little immediate benefit to the North Korean economy from the U.S. announcement on Sept. 17 to ease some trade sanctions, but saw future potential for greater North/South Korean economic cooperation.
  • U.S. Department of State Daily Press Briefing 29 September 1999 -- North Korea provided a pledge, that they then publicly acknowledged last week: that they would not conduct a further missile test, while negotiations between our two countries were ongoing, aiming towards achieving an improvement in our bilateral relationship.
  • N. KOREA / ARMS Voice of America 28 September 1999 -- A report by the South Korean Defense Ministry says North Korea has exported millions of dollars worth of military hardware in recent years.
  • Weekly On North Korea ROK National Intelligence Service September 20 - September 26, 1999
  • CLINTON - NORTH KOREA Voice of America 22 September 1999 -- President Clinton says he believes North Korea will abide by its agreement to suspend missile testing, but he warns the United States would take unspecified action against Pyongyang if it reneges on its promise.
  • U-S / NORTH KOREA Voice of America 20 September 1999 -- Some experts in Asian politics and Members of Congress say they think Washington made a mistake in offering to drop economic sanctions against North Korea in exchange for a North Korean promise to stop missile tests. Other analysts say the only way to promote change in North Korea is to have more contacts with the isolated, impoverished, Communist regime.
  • Weekly On North Korea ROK National Intelligence Service September 13 - September 19, 1999
  • Transcript: Albright, Perry Sept. 17 Briefing on North KoreaUSIA 17 September 1999 -- Although former Secretary of Defense William Perry's recent review of U.S. policy toward North Korea and the Berlin understanding with North Korea on its missile program hold the possibility of long-term stability and eventual reconciliation on the Korean Peninsula, the United States has no illusions about the process, according to Secretary of State Madeleine Albright.
  • Dr. William Perry, U.S. North Korea Policy Coordinator and Special Advisor to the President and the Secretary of State Interview on The PBS NewsHour by Margaret Warner, September 17, 1999 -- We believe that deterrence is stable unless -- unless nuclear weapons and missiles are introduced. Therefore, we're trying to focus on not having the nuclear and nuclear weapons and missiles upsetting that deterrence.
  • Dr. William Perry, U.S. North Korea Policy Coordinator and Special Advisor to the President and the Secretary of State Interview by Natalie Allen of CNN, September 17, 1999 -- Five years ago, that deterrence was challenged by the emergence of a nuclear program in North Korea and we came at that time very close to a dangerous military conflict.
  • Dr. William Perry, U.S. North Korea Policy Coordinator and Special Advisor to the President and the Secretary of State Interview by Sonia Russler of CNNI, September 17, 1999 -- I believe that the North Korean missile program -- their motivation for that program was for their own security. We have a hard time understanding that. We don't see ourselves as being threats to North Korea, but they see themselves as being threatened -- and I believe that's the purpose of their missile program.
  • White House Briefing September 17, 1999 - We have sanctions here that we're talking about lifting, which is based on our, U.S., national interests in promoting security in the region. And we believe that this step will promote both of those. Our understanding is that they will refrain from long-range missile testing.
  • Easing Sanctions Against North Korea FACT SHEET September 17, 1999 - Restrictions associated with North Korea?s designation as a terrorist-supporting state will remain in place. These restrictions affect trade and/or financial transactions with certain North Korean entities. In addition, statutory restrictions such as U.S. missile technology sanctions remain in place, as do restrictions based on multilateral arrangements and nonproliferation controls.
  • Easing Sanctions Against North Korea STATEMENT BY THE PRESS SECRETARY - September 17, 1999 - Today the President announced his decision to ease some sanctions against the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea (North Korea), administered under the Trading With the Enemy Act, Defense Production Act, and the Department of Commerce?s Export Administration Regulations.
  • CLINTON-KOREA SANCTIONS Voice of America 17 September 1999 -- President Clinton is easing restrictions on U-S trade and finance with North Korea in return for a commitment by Pyongyang not to test long-range ballistic missiles.
  • U-S/NORTH KOREA Voice of America 17 September 1999 -- The United States has announced a lifting of some economic sanctions against Communist North Korea in response to the North's pledge to refrain from further tests of long-range missiles. Details on what could lead to the most significant thaw in relations between both countries since the end of the Korean conflict nearly 50 years ago.
  • CLINTON-KOREA SANCTIONS Voice of America 17 September 1999 -- President Clinton is easing restrictions on U-S trade and finance with North Korea in return for a commitment by Pyongyang not to test long-range ballistic missiles.
  • U-S / KOREA / SANCTIONS Voice of America 17 September 1999 -- President Clinton is easing commercial and trade sanctions against North Korea, which has pledged to forgo testing of long-range ballistic missiles
  • U.S. Department of State Daily Press Briefing 15 September 1999 - Perry will be in a position to speak more publicly about his findings and recommendations in the coming day or so. I'm not aware there is an unclassified summary of the report.
  • DEALING ANEW WITH NORTH KOREA Voice of America 15 September 1999 -- More than a month ago, the U-S Central Intelligence Agency warned that the North Koreans were readying a new, longer-range missile. Now, the Clinton administration, together with the governments of Japan and South Korea have apparently headed off this threat.
  • REMARKS BY THE PRESIDENT UPON DEPARTURE FROM AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND September 14, 1999 -- Following talks in Berlin, we understand and expect that North Korea will refrain from testing long-range missiles of any kind, while our discussions continue. We're, in turn, considering measures to ease sanctions and move toward normalizing economic relations with North Korea.
  • PRESS BRIEFING BY NATIONAL SECURITY ADVISOR SANDY BERGER, NATIONAL ECONOMIC ADVISOR GENE SPERLING, AND PRESS SECRETARY JOE LOCKHART September 13, 1999 -- It is now our understanding and expectation that the North Koreans will refrain from testing any long-range missiles for the duration of our negotiations to improve relations. This is an important initial step for addressing our concerns about North Korea's missile program. For our part, we are considering a number of measures to ease economic sanctions against North Korea, and expect to make a recommendation to the President in the near future.
  • U.S. Department of State Daily Press Briefing 13 September 1999 -- NORTH KOREA Based on Berlin bilateral talks, US understands DPRK will refrain from testing long-range missiles while negotiations on improving relations continue. If DPRK were to forego testing, it would be of benefit to the relationship. Secretary Albright is prepared to recommend to the President easing restrictions on non-sensitive goods, investment, certain financial transactions and transportation restrictions. Food issue was not raised in Berlin talks. This understanding is a very substantial step forward. Initial deployment of missile defense not premised upon a DPRK missile threat . Sea boundary issue did not arise in Berlin talks.
  • Text: U.S., North Korean Delegations Meet in Berlin Sept. 7-12 USIA 13 September 1999 -- Delegations from the United States and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea) met September 7-12 in Berlin, Germany, for more high-level talks on pending issues.
  • NORTH KOREA MISSILE Voice of America 13 September 1999 -- The United States says that it has come to agreement with North Korea over Pyongyang's missile program, following six days of talks in Berlin.
  • U-S NORTH KOREA MISSILE Voice of America 13 September 1999 -- The United States says it believes it has an agreement with North Korea in which Pyongyang will freeze tests of its long-range missiles as long as both countries remain in negotiations aimed at improving relations.
  • Weekly On North Korea ROK National Intelligence Service September 6 - September 13, 1999
  • CLINTON / NORTH KOREA Voice of America 12 September 1999 -- President Clinton and the leaders of South Korea and Japan are considering easing sanctions against North Korea, if it gives up its weapons program.
  • Trilateral Summit Joint Press Statement September 12, 1999 -- The three leaders confirmed that they are prepared to undertake measures to improve their respective relations with the DPRK as the DPRK addresses the concerns of the U.S., ROK, and Japan, and takes steps to reduce tensions and establish lasting peace on the Korean peninsula and beyond.
  • U.S. Department of State Daily Press Briefing 07 September 1999 -- NORTH KOREA Bilateral meetings have just begun; sea boundary dispute came up in general officer talks last week in Panmunjom.
  • Perry Report Recommends Package Deal Chosun Ilbo 05 Sept 1999 --US North Korean Policy Administrator, William Perry's report is known to have been completed and will be distributed at the US, South Korea and Japan summit in New Zealand on September 12, following the US, North Korean missile talks in Berlin on September 7. It details five measures: full implementation of the Geneva Accord, acceptance of the MTCR to solve the missile issue, talks at ministerial and above levels, a three stage economic assistance package and normalization of relations between Japan and North Korea.
  • S. Korea warns NK not to cross sea border By Jim Lea Pacific Stars & Stripes September 5, 1999 -- South Korea put its forces in the Yellow Sea on higher alert Friday and warned North Korea not to violate the Northern Limit Line that has been the sea border between the two Koreas since 1953.
  • Weekly On North Korea ROK National Intelligence Service August 30 - September 5, 1999
  • North Limit Line Talks End In Impasse; NK Threatens Action Pacific Stars And Stripes Sept. 3, 1999 -- A meeting between North Korean army and U.N. Command generals at Panmunjom on Tuesday ended with no progress on the disputed sea border between South and North Korea. During the talks, the sixth such meeting since June, Pyongyang's representatives threatened to take "decisive and resolute" action.
  • KOREAS / BORDER Voice of America 03 September 1999 -- South Korea has pledged to defend a disputed sea border with neighboring North Korea.
  • NORTH KOREA / BORDER Voice of America 02 September 1999 -- North Korea has threatened to take action over a disputed sea border with neighboring South Korea. It says that the so-called "Northern Limit Line," separating the waters of the two countries, is invalid.
  • NORTH KOREA / MISSILE Voice of America 02 September 1999 -- The prime ministers of Japan and South Korea are promising to reward North Korea if it drops plans to test launch a ballistic missile.
  • U.S. Department of State Daily Press Briefing 02 September 1999 -- NORTH KOREA -- US hopes contacts through general officer talks, as well as ROK-DPRK contacts, will result in amicable solution. Northern Limit Line was raised in Panmunjom talks yesterday. Sea demarcation dates from 1953, when area was a war zone. US-DPRK bilateral talks take place in Berlin next week.
  • The Republic of Korea's Position Regarding North Korea's Attempt to Launch Another Missile 01 September 1999 -- President Kim Dae-jung outlines his policies with respect to the prospect of North Korea continuing its long-range missile program.



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