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TAK 2049 Green Valley

Combat Prepositioning Force, or CPF, ships provide quick-response delivery of US Army equipment for ground troops. The TAK 2049 Green Valley and her sister ships are barge-carrying LASH, or lighter aboard ship, vessel capable of carrying both barges and containers. These ships carry ammunition barges that are off-loaded by the ship's crane and pushed pierside by small tugs that are part of the LASH ship's deck equipment. Each is capable of carrying up to 88 cargo barges (lighters), but may carry less to make room for containers and pusher boats. Each lighter weighs between 82 and 86 long tons and may discharge either pierside or in stream. LASH vessels have two gantry-style cranes: one 30-long-ton crane (forward) for moving containers and one 465.18-long-ton gantry for moving lighters. This second gantry can move nearly the length of the ship (except for holds one and two) to discharge pusher boats, lighters, and hatch covers. In addition to the gantry cranes, LASH vessels have a 3-long-ton general cargo crane to help load the ship's stores. Green Valley carries U.S. Army ammunition and is capable of independent, self-sustaining operations. Due to its self-sustaining capabilities, Green Valley is particularly conducive to loading and unloading operations where port restrictions preclude the ship from tying up at a pier. The ship are prepositioned in Diego Garcia. Berthing, messing and sanitary facilities are limited. Ship's support needs to be agreed prior to operations. Portable toilets, meals from ashore and crew shift from ashore may be required.

At the end of FY 2000, the Combat Prepositioning Ships fleet consisted of 14 ships: one conversion LMSR, five new LMSRs, two container ships, one heavy-lift ship, one float-on/float-off ship, one crane ship activated from the Ready Reserve Force and three ammunition LASH barge ships. The three LASH ships were replaced by two container ships in FY 2001.

The Army Materiel Command's Operations Support Command changed the way it stores ammunition for Army pre-positioned stocks (APS)-afloat. In the past, three lighterage aboard ship (LASH) vessels carried ammunition in a breakbulk barge configuration. Now, two modern containerships carry ammunition in strategic configured loads that contain all the munitions needed by a deployed team, platoon, or company. Loads will support various armor, artillery, and aviation combat platforms. The break bulk ammunition (barge configuration) carried on three lighter aboard ship (LASH) vessels was converted to containerized strategic configured loads placed on two modern container ships. The climate controlled container ships are faster, have more capacity, and use standard containers, International Standards Organization (ISO) containers and M1 flatracks, to speed deployment times. Most strategic configured loads contain all the munitions needed for a deployed team, platoon, or company - this reduces the number of support personnel needed in the area of operation. The loads support various armor, artillery, and aviation combat platforms.

The MSC's charter contracts with four LASH vessels expired in late 2000 and early 2001. Since these LASH vessels were no longer under contract and were not needed for current operations, International Shipholding Corporation (ISC) sold each of these vessels (one was sold in 2000 and the remaining three were sold in 2001). One of the LASH vessels was sold while held for disposal. This vessel completed its commitment under charter with the U.S. Military Command, reached the end of its economic life, and was sold for scrap.

In June of 2001, International Shipholding Corporation (ISC) adopted a plan to separate the LASH service (the Liner Services segment), its Cape-Size Bulk Carrier (the Time Charter Contracts segment) and certain Special Purpose barges (the Other segment), from the balance of its operations and dispose of these assets. This included the sale of one of the Company's Ice Strengthened Multi-Purpose vessels, "GREEN RIDGE," and the scrapping of three of the Company's LASH vessels, the "JEB STUART," the "GREEN VALLEY," and the "GREEN HARBOUR".

In June of 2001, International Shipholding Company adopted a plan to separate the LASH service (the Liner Services segment), its Cape-Size Bulk Carrier (the Time Charter Contracts segment) and certain Special Purpose barges (the Other segment), from the balance of its operations and dispose of these assets. In December of 2001, the Company reclassified its Foreign Flag LASH service (operating under the name "Forest Lines") assets which are comprised of two LASH vessels, one Dockship and 599 barges, as assets held for use as a result of extended cargo commitments from a major shipper.

During 2001, in accordance with SFAS No. 121, the Company recognized an impairment loss of $81,038,000 comprised of $60,553,000 on the U.S. Flag LASH liner service, one Cape-Size Bulk Carrier, and 28 Special Purpose barges, $18,130,000 on its Foreign Flag LASH service and $2,355,000 on one of its LASH vessels that was sold while held for disposal. This vessel completed its commitment under charter with the U.S. Military Command, reached the end of its economic life, and was sold for scrap.

The "Assets Held-for-Disposal" in the Liner Services segment include four U.S. Flag LASH vessels, one Foreign Flag LASH vessel, one FLASH unit, and 1,200 LASH barges. This service transports cargo between the U.S. Gulf and Atlantic coasts and the Middle East, East Africa, the Indian sub-continent and Southeast Asia operated under the name "Waterman." The past several years have reflected a downward trend in the Liner Services segment as a result of higher operating cost, disruptions in service due to unplanned maintenance and changes in market conditions.

In anticipation of the disposal of the U.S. Flag LASH service, a staff reduction of approximately 31% of the Company's shore base staff was effected early in the third quarter, 2001 and in January, 2002. This action reduces the Company's administration and general expenses by approximately $3,600,000 on an annualized basis.

Three years in planning, the $36.5 million project was completed in July 2001. During the conversion, all the ammunition was removed from the ships SS Green Valley, SS Green Harbour and MV Jeb Stuart. The ammunition was then inspected, tested, maintained, bar coded, and loaded into climate controlled containers or onto M1 flatracks. When complete, the new loads were placed in ISO containers aboard the MV John U.D. Page and MV Eddie Carter. Nearly 70,000 tons of ammunition were transformed to the new configurations. It is a time saver for the 100,000 requisitions each month.

The off loading of ammunition from the Lighterage Aboard Ship SS Green Valley was completed 16 November 2000 at Military Ocean Terminal Sunny Point, North Carolina. All of the ship's ammunition was removed from the storage barges, then inspected, tested, maintained, and bar-coded. Once bar-coded, the new ammunition Strategic Configured Loads began to be assembled. The upload of the Page began 26 February 2001, with completion March 9th. The ammunition bar-coding effort, led by the Munitions and Armaments Command, provides improved tracking of ammunition identification, conditions and history. The bar-codes use a new "2 Dimensional" 2D technology. The main advantage of using 2D bar codes is a large amount of data can ride with the item it is attached to. Older linear bar codes hold a piece of data, such as the national stock number or lot number. With 2D bar codes, large amounts of data are stored, such as the national stock numbers, lot numbers, and serial numbers for a load of ammunition. So with one pull on the scanner trigger, all the data is collected, not just a piece. A team of 35 people printed, applied and recorded 25,000 bar-code labels to the off loaded ammunition. The Multiple Launch Rocket System's off loaded from the ship were also bar coded, the first time they were scanned and recorded by serial number. There were at least four people on site installing and recording labels through July 2001 when the LASH conversion was complete. The bar code team then began to apply the 25 thousand labels made for ammunition from the next LASH conversion ship, the SS Green Harbour.



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