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AM-136 Admirable

Admirable class minesweepers formed the largest class of American minesweepers ordered during the war and proved to be one of the most successful classes. They were also employed as patrol and escort vessels. The Admirable class minesweepers were constructed from 1942-45 to support counter mine operations during World War Two. The Navy was woefully short of minesweepers at the beginning of the war. 122 Admirable class minesweepers were built by American shipyards. 94 were cancelled. Over thirty of these minesweepers were leased to Russia toward the end of World War Two and were never returned.

Admirable class minesweepers were basic minesweepers similar to the British Bangor class designed to meet minimum requirements for size, speed, and endurance. They were fitted for both wire and acoustic sweeping and could also double as anti submarine warfare and antiaircraft ships. Admirable class minesweepers formed the majority of American minesweepers built during World War II.

The fleet minesweeper was one of the many support ships designed to service and protect the larger naval vessels in operation against the Japanese in World War II. Although the Japanese had done little mining in the path of the United States navy they were known to have purchased thousands of British and American mines after World War I. Many of these mines were used in the Philippines and in the waters close to Japan where they caused considerable trouble. The purpose of the fleet minesweeper was to arrive before the fleet and sweep the areas for mines. Fleet minesweepers remained with the fleet, during operation, constantly sweeping to insure safe operation for the larger ships of the navy. Fleet minesweepers were the first to arrive in enemy waters and the last to leave. Their job, although not glamorous or well known by the American public, was absolutely essential to the safety and success of American naval operations against Japan in World War II.



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