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Corps Distribution Command (Provisional)

The Corps Distribution Command (Provisional), a subordinate unit of the 13th Corps Support Command was inactivated during a ceremony held at Sadowski Field, Fort Hood, Texas on 8 June 2005, as part of the transformation of the 13th Corps Support Command to an expeditionary sustainment command.

The Corps Distribution Command (Provisional), 13th Corps Support Command was designed as a viable logistical structure in support of the Army's Digitized Division concept. The Corps Distribution Command Support Concept was a logistical support-planning/training document, providing clear goals and concept for development of Corps Distribution Commands, as well as, the Distribution Management Center (DMC) and its 2 deployable Distribution Command Posts (DCP 1 and 2) in support of the III Corps force structure of the future. This force was trained as an integral member of the joint and combined arms team ensuring that it remained strategically versatile, responsive, and a viable support structure at every point on the spectrum of conflict. The concept identified ways to ensure its stability through the examination of future requirements and establishment of means to manage change. Managing change required a plan. The Corps Distribution Command Support Concept was designed to plot the course for transforming logistical support for III Corps forces of the 21st century.

The Distribution Management Center was designed as a viable logistical structure in support of the Army's Digitized Division's. It was a logistical support organization limiting redundancy in personnel and mission sets, but designed on a concept to develop a fully capable configuration around the principle of unity of command in support of the III Corps force structure of the future. This force was to be trained as an integral member of the joint and combined arms team ensuring that it remains strategically versatile, responsive, and a viable support structure at every point on the spectrum of conflict.

The framework was built around the merger of the Support Operations Staff Section (SPO) and 4th Corps Material Management Center, both organic to the 13th Corps Support Command. By consolidating operations and reducing staff structures the 13th Corps Support Command achieved unity of command, enhanced responsiveness, and expand logistical information and situational awareness. The structure allowed commander to tailor material management in support of mission sets, providing a modular design capable of allowing for teams to be pushed forward in support of divisional units and provide support to the battle command concept.

In April of FY03, the refurbishment of Bowlers Green, an old bowling alley transformed into an office building to facilitate the consolidation, was completed and the Support Operations Staff Section (SPO) and 4th Corps Material Management Center began the move to merge into one organization structure, the DMC. In October of FY03, the Supply and Troop, Maintenance and Weapon System, and Munitions support branches (SPO section) was merged with 4th Corps Material Management Center. The Readiness Operations Division, 4th Corps Material Management Center, consisting of 5 Material Management Teams and Logistic Statistics Branch, was augmented with personnel from Transportation and Plans branches (SPO section) and a new division was created the Current Operations Division. In December of FY03, a representative from CASCOM visited the SPO section, 13 COSCOM, to review the concept and design, on the DMC structure and operations. After that, 13th Corps Support Command and CASCOM worked together on a design for the structure and personnel requirements for the new organization to be fielded in the summer of FY04 under the Force XXI Redesign.

This initiative combined the existing force structures and incorporated a versatile logistical management capability that expanded the support available to the III Corps Commander. It completed III Corps' distribution network operating within and forward of the corps area. The proposed design afforded maximum mission capability, increased responsiveness, tailored for employment in full spectrum operation, non-taxing on the existing Army force structure, and expanded the range of force employment options to effectively support divisional and non-divisional units. The new Distribution Management Center design required no new organizational structures, only modifications to existing unit types. It expanded the range of available options, and maximum mission capability and increased responsiveness by allowing elements to be tailored into modular unit configurations required to provide a support function or a group of related functions. The structure offered III Corps a more versatile combined distribution system capable of supporting deployment, as well as, employment in an operational environment that can greatly increase flexibility, and strategic responsiveness.

The Corps Distribution Command (Provisional), a brigade sized unit, was activated as an Army transformational unit on 18 December 2003 at Fort Hood, Texas. This provisional, first-of-its-kind unit, was part of the Army's comprehensive plan to revolutionize Army logistics while transforming the total Army force. In peacetime, the Corps Distribution Command contained 3 operational battalions, the 49th Transportation Battalion (Movement Control), the 4th Corps Material Management Center, and the 13th Corps Support Command Special Troops Battalion.

On 4 January 2004, the unit deployed as part of III Corps in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom II. In support of Operation Iraqi Freedom II, the unit added 3 additional battalions that included the 138th Personnel Service Battalion and the 126th and 50th Finance Battalions for a total strength of over 1,600 soldiers.

The unit combined the functionalities of commodity management, movement control into one organization with the mission to provide sustainment distribution to major subordinate commands of the III Corps. The Corps Distribution Command concept integrated logistics operations, plans and management under one umbrella for the Corps Support Command Commanding General. Using Intransit Visibility (ITV) satellite tracking systems and state of the art logistics automated designs, Corps Distribution Command organizations were able to track and manage near-real-time locations of convoys, vehicles, and critical materiel commodities in support of combat forces and provide a Logistics Common Operating Picture (LCOP) for effective management of all logistics for Multinational Coalition Forces Iraq.

It was at LSA Anaconda, near Balad, Iraq that the 1,600 Soldier Brigade would make its mark on combat service support operations across the 900-mile Iraq combat zone as it supported over 165,000 U.S. and Coalition personnel. The CDC and its subordinate units produced staggering statistics as they provided all aspects of logistics support to the Multi-National Forces.




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