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Mitsubishi SpaceJet / YS-X Mitsubishi Regional Jet (MRJ)

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, or MHI, planned to cut its 2021 budget for the jet by 90 percent from 2019. The plane the world has been waiting for is called the Mitsubishi SpaceJet. MHI has missed six delivery deadlines going back to 2013. It was also forced to suspend test flights in the US because of the coronavirus pandemic. Sources say the reason for the decision to cut back on funding is the poor short-term outlook for the airline industry, which has been crippled by the pandemic. MHI will reduce the annual cost of the venture to around 95 million dollars from fiscal year 2021.

There were media reports on 22 October 2020 regarding the SpaceJet program, an aircraft under development by Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation, a group company of Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI). MHI Group, including Mitsubishi Aircraft and MHI, has made no announcements on this matter. Mitsubishi stated "MHI is continuing a detailed review of the schedule of the SpaceJet program, in view of the impact of COVID-19, and is moving forward with development with an appropriate budget that takes into consideration the challenging financial headwinds facing MHI Group. It is true that we are considering various possibilities, but there is no truth to reports that we have decided to freeze development."

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries completed its $550 million acquisition of Bombardiers CRJ program, but not its production facilities, in June 2020. The deal calls for MHI to buy the CRJs maintenance, support, refurbishment, marketing and sales activities, including support and service assets in Mirabel, Toronto, Bridgeport (West Virginia) and Tucson (Arizona). MHI is not acquiring CRJ production, which the companies have said will conclude when Bombardier produces all remaining CRJs on order. The acquisition gave Mitsubishi Aircraft the global support network it needed to secure major sales. The company will provide a holistic servicing and support solution for the global aircraft industry, including the CRJ series aircraft, and eventually for the Mitsubishi SpaceJet family of next-generation regional jets, MHI said.

SpaceJet, previously known as Mitsubishi Regional Jet, is the commercial name of its product family, which includes SpaceJet M90 and SpaceJet M100. The Mitsubishi SpaceJet establishes a new standard for passenger experience. With the most spacious cabin in regional travel, the latest in-cabin technologies, and the widest economy seat in all of air travel, the Mitsubishi SpaceJet offers more opportunity for revenue and the industrys most comfortable cabin experience. Advanced aerodynamics and Pratt & Whitneys revolutionary Geared Turbofan technology provide game-changing efficiency gains. The Mitsubishi SpaceJet Family's clean-sheet design enabled its sleek, streamlined design from nose to tailgenerating industry-best fuel efficiency and noise reduction.

The COVID-19 crisis and ensuing economic downturn led to significant challenges in the global aerospace industry. Rapid reduction in demand driven by travel restrictions has airlines grappling with how to conduct business. Regional aircraft offer a better seat-count match to capacity in a low-demand environment. Airlines can maintain schedules similar to those pre-disruption, but with smaller aircraft that deliver more favorable economics. Major airlines turned to small narrowbodies and regional aircraft to maintain network scale on domestic routes. The immediate post-9/11 period witnessed a similar trend in the relative resilience of regional versus mainline aircraft deployment, and during the Great Recession of 2008, regional aircraft used on domestic U.S. routes were similarly resilient.

The drive to develop Japans first commercial aircraft since 1974 hit another stumbling block in June 2020 as flight tests were halted and production was shut down. Service entry of the 76-seat M100, which had not yet flown, had been scheduled for 2023. Mitsubishi postponed service entry of the M90 until 2021, but by mid-2020 it was unclear when this will occur.

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries ceased flight test operations of its SpaceJet project in Moses Lake. Mitsubishi did not disclose the number of employees affected, but hundreds of jobs in the state were expected to be cut as the company slashed its SpaceJet budget. Mitsubishi closed its headquarters in Renton, laying off 240 staff 79 in Renton and 161 at the flight test center in Moses Lake. The company consolidated to its headquarters in Nagoya, Japan. A small crew of employees will be retained in Moses Lake to store and maintain the four flight test aircraft at the Grant County International Airport.

Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation, a MHI Group company, announced March 18, 2020 that it has completed the maiden flight of Flight Test Vehicle 10 (FTV10), the first Mitsubishi SpaceJet M90 in final, certifiable baseline configuration. Mitsubishi Aircraft planned to continue flight tests on FTV10 in Nagoya, as well as prepare for the ferry flight to Moses Lake Flight Test Center (MFC) to join the remainder of the Mitsubishi SpaceJet M90 test fleet for the final phase of type certification flight test.

Over the last few years, Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation has restructured its company and gathered the personnel and resources to create a global organization capable of becoming one of the leading commercial aviation companies in the world. Today, as the company prepares to end its fiscal year, Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation announced executive personnel changes. These changes will be effective from 01 April 2020.

Mitsubishi Aircraft Corp. planned to push back the first delivery of its passenger jet to 2021 or later in its sixth schedule delay, Kyodo News reported 25 January 2020. Japan's first homegrown small passenger jet, called Mitsubishi SpaceJet, previously known as Mitsubishi Regional Jet, was scheduled to be delivered to All Nippon Airways Co. by the middle of 2020 under the current plan. The aircraft subsidiary of Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. initially planned to conduct a test flight by its redesigned jetliner in June 2019 but problems with some parts delayed the test.

Mitsubishi Aircraft initially planned to begin delivering the jetliner in 2013 but the delivery plan was repeatedly postponed due to changes in design, reviews of the manufacturing process and a delay in parts delivery. The delays have already raised the development cost for the passenger jet to 800 billion yen ($7 billion) from the initial estimate of 600 billion yen. The order book took a hit in late 2019 when Trans States Holdings canceled its order for 50 aircraft and 50 options. Simply put, the aircraft seats 88 passengers, which is too many for some U.S. regional airlines.

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) announced January 23, 2017 that MHI and Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation would adjust the first delivery of the Mitsubishi Regional Jet (MRJ) from mid-2018 to mid-2020. The change was due to revisions of certain systems and electrical configurations on the aircraft to meet the latest requirements for certification. This fifth delay in the program, which followed a yearlong delay in late 2015, came after engineers discovered the design failed to meet certification requirements related to the safe separation of redundant aircraft systems.

MHI recently established the MRJ Business Promotion Committee, chaired by Shunichi Miyanaga, President & Chief Executive Officer of MHI, to oversee the continued development and long-term business performance of the MRJ, effective on November 28, 2016. Since the historic MRJ first flight in November 2015, MHI made significant progress in both engineering and test, and now three aircraft are in flight test in the United States. Going forward, under the MRJ Business Promotion Committees oversight, MHI would continue to make prompt decisions and remain firmly committed to the development of the MRJ to offer our customers an aircraft with world-class performance and compatibility with latest industry certifications.

Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation confirmed 07 November 2015 positive results in a fast taxiing test by Japans first passenger jet, MRJ. The aircraft Mitsubishi Regional Jet (MRJ) reached speeds of 220 km/h while taxiing and performed nose gear liftoff. The aircraft was expected to make its maiden flight between November 9 and 15. In October 2014, the aircraft was presented to the general public, with an expected first flight to take place in May 2015. But the maiden liftoff was postponed several times for technical reasons.

The MRJ is a 70-90 seat class regional jet currently being developed by MHI with cutting-edge technology that will enable dual achievement of top-class operational economy and outstanding cabin comfort. The MRJ will be the first regional jet to adopt composite materials for its wings and vertical fins on significant scale. In combination with new engines and an advanced aerodynamic design, the aircraft is being planned to reduce fuel consumption substantially and to contribute greatly to enhanced competitiveness and lower operating costs for the airline companies.

Japan faces a number of obstacles to full-scale participation in aircraft manufacturing, including air transport infrastructure and regulatory constraints that limit the potential of the domestic market to support an aircraft program, reliance on the military sector, relatively high costs, and national policies which prohibit the export of dual civilian and military use technology and products.

The industry's successor to the YS-11, the YS-X 100-seat regional transport, in development since the 1980s, produced only feasibility studies. Japanese firms have been interested in entering the regional jet market, with firms expressing interest in the idea since at least 1991. In the mid-1990s, a partnership between Mitsubishi and Bombardier to produce 100-seat regional jets was discussed, but never came to fruition.

In 1996, for the first time in 40 years [since the last project of YS-11 aircraft], an attempt was to be made to develop, produce and commercialize a small-sized (70-120 seats) civil air transport system (YSX). A total of 380 million yen was allocated in FY'97 (610 million yen in 1996). Japan hoped that Boeing might be the Western partner to support its YS-X project, but the company's decision to produce the 717-200 appeared to preclude U.S.-Japanese cooperation on the similar YS-X program. Funding for the program was cut to $1.3 million for 1998-99, presumably in response to a growing competitive environment in the medium-sized aircraft sector and the industry's lack of progress on the program.

In 2003, the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) and Japanese industries started jointly the "R&D of Environment-Friendly, High-Performance Small Aircraft" that improved greatly by reduction of weight, low drag and also fuel efficiency. Japan Aircraft Development Corporation co-ordinated indigenous designs for a next-generation regional jet (NGRJ) airliner, with both Kawasaki and Mitsubishi offering competing projects. FHI and Japan Aircraft Development Corporation (JADC) participated in the regional jet program as a joint developer. This aircraft is planned in 70~90 seat classes that materialized highly efficiency, beside this aircraft utilizes IT technology.

MHI started the regional jet "MRJ" development program in order to cope with problems in the small regional jet development project supported by METI. In 2003, Mitsubishi launched a study, half-funded by the government, to explore the feasibility of a Japanese RJ. First provisional details of Mitsubishi design were revealed in 2004, then as T-tailed, rear-engined design (two 30.7 kN; 6,900 lb st class turbofans) in 30-passengers class. Initially the study focused on the 30-50 seat market, but by 2005 it had become clear that there was greater demand in the 70-90 seat market.

In 2005 it was reported that Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. planned to launch a project within the fiscal year to develop and commercialize Japan's first domestic passenger jet. The company planned to develop a jet capable of carrying 70-90 passengers and aimed to conduct its maiden flight in fiscal 2008.

By 2006, this had transmuted into stretched-fuselage, low-tailed design with underwing podded engines and intended for 70/90-passenger market. By 2007, the Japanese government indicated that it would offer financial assistance totaling 40 billion for the aircraft's development, about 1/3 of the estimated cost. The western debut came at Paris in June 2007, when a full-size cabin mockup was shown and program timetable announced.

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries of Japan is developing a lightweight, fuel efficient next-generation Mitsubishi Regional Jet (MRJ), a 70-90-seat airliner. Unlike China's ARJ21, Mitsubishi's aircraft will feature extensive use of lightweight composite materials. Employing the latest technologies in its airframe and engine, the MRJ will be the first regional jet to use composite material for it wings and vertical stabiliser. Coupled with Pratt & Whitney's newly developed Geared Turbo Fan, it is expected to bring about a 40% saving in fuel, and increase revenue by an annual 5 billion yen, when compared with 737-500 aircraft.

Authorisation to offer was then expected in third quarter of 2007; launch in second quarter of 2008; first flight in early 2011; deliveries from 2012; production of 15 envisaged in first year. By March 2008 Japan Airlines (JAL) and All Nippon Airways (ANA) were in the final stages of deciding whether to buy the small passenger jet being developed by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. JAL was expected to buy more than 30 of the MRJs while JAL is expected to sign on for 30 jets. Mitsubishi has said it wanted 100 advance orders for the MRJ before moving ahead to commercialize the production.

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI), the first company in Japan to manufacture and market jetliners, launched the Mitsubishi Regional Jet (MRJ) in 2008. MHI has created the tentatively-named Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation to conduct MRJ's business, and the Corporation has been capitalised at 3 billion with calls to increase up to 100 billion (around 500 million) in line with business operations development. Mitsubishi Heavy plans to sell 1,000 of the 70-to-90 seat aircraft over the next two decades and begin delivery in 2013. All Nippon Airways Co., Japan's largest domestic carrier, has ordered 25 planes, including options.

With between 70 and 90 passenger seats, the jet will be the first regional plane to use a significant amount of composite material for its wings and vertical fins. The aircraft will also have reduced fuel consumption and lower operating costs for airline companies. MHI had already received an order from All Nippon Airways - Japan's second-largest international airline - for 25 of the aircraft, the first of which will enter service in 2013. The company, which currently employs approximately 200 people, plans to further develop the jet in an effort to penetrate the global air market.

Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd., maker of Subaru-brand cars and aircraft parts for Boeing Co., may help design Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd.'s regional passenger jet. Fuji Heavy engineering support would follow Toyota Motor Corp.'s investment in the project. Toyota, Fuji Heavy's largest shareholder, is helping Mitsubishi Heavy, Japan's largest aerospace company, compete with planes from Bombardier Inc. of Canada and Brazil's Empresa Brasileira de Aeronautica SA.

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) officially launched the Mitsubishi Regional Jet (MRJ), a next-generation regional jetliner, on 28 March 2008. Beginning April 1, Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation (tentative name), a new company established by MHI to conduct MRJ business, will accelerate the MRJ's development and further strengthen sales activities to potential customers worldwide. As Japan's first company to manufacture and market original passenger jetliners, Mitsubishi Aircraft will fulfill a long-cherished wish of the Japanese aircraft industry, leveraging technological expertise that MHI has built up through its aerospace business.

Mitsubishi Aircraft will be responsible for various key activities in the MRJ project, including the jetliner's design, acquisition of type certification (T/C), procurement, sales and customer support. MHI's Nagoya Aerospace Systems Works will manufacture both the prototype aircraft and production models; it will also be in charge of the MRJ's flight testing.

Mitsubishi Aircraft was established as a wholly owned subsidiary of MHI capitalized at 3 billion yen (common stock and capital reserve), with plans calling for an increase up to 100 billion yen in line with business operations development. MHI plans to furnish roughly two-thirds of the requisite capital, and to secure the remaining equity investment it has approached companies including Toyota Motor Corporation, Mitsubishi Corporation, Mitsui & Co., Ltd., Sumitomo Corporation and the Development Bank of Japan. Mitsubishi Aircraft, headquartered in Nagoya, is to start with approximately 200 employees. Nobuo Toda, Director and Senior Vice President at MHI, has been named its first president.

The MRJ is a 70-90 seat class regional jet being developed by MHI with cutting-edge technology that will enable dual achievement of top-class operational economy and outstanding cabin comfort. The MRJ will be the first regional jet to adopt composite materials for its wings and vertical fins on significant scale. In combination with new engines and an advanced aerodynamic design, the aircraft is being planned to reduce fuel consumption substantially and to contribute greatly to enhanced competitiveness and lower operating costs for the airline companies.

On 28 March 2008 Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) officially launched the Mitsubishi Regional Jet (MRJ), a next-generation regional jetliner. Beginning April 1, Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation (tentative name), a new company established by MHI to conduct MRJ business, will accelerate the MRJ's development and further strengthen sales activities to potential customers worldwide. As Japan's first company to manufacture and market original passenger jetliners, Mitsubishi Aircraft will fulfill a long-cherished wish of the Japanese aircraft industry, leveraging technological expertise that MHI has built up through its aerospace business.

Mitsubishi Aircraft will be responsible for various key activities in the MRJ project, including the jetliner's design, acquisition of type certification (T/C), procurement, sales and customer support. MHI's Nagoya Aerospace Systems Works will manufacture both the prototype aircraft and production models; it will also be in charge of the MRJ's flight testing.

Mitsubishi Aircraft was established as a wholly owned subsidiary of MHI capitalized at 3 billion yen (common stock and capital reserve), with plans calling for an increase up to 100 billion yen in line with business operations development. MHI plans to furnish roughly two-thirds of the requisite capital, and to secure the remaining equity investment it has approached companies including Toyota Motor Corporation, Mitsubishi Corporation, Mitsui & Co., Ltd., Sumitomo Corporation and the Development Bank of Japan. Mitsubishi Aircraft, headquartered in Nagoya, is to start with approximately 200 employees. Nobuo Toda, Director and Senior Vice President at MHI, has been named its first president.

Since deciding on authorization to offer (ATO) the MRJ in October 2007, MHI conducted full-scale marketing activities worldwide. Based on positive responses from potential customers, including an order for 25 aircraft (15 firm, 10 optional) from All Nippon Airways Co., Ltd., MHI decided to formally launch the MRJ program, targeting the aircraft's entry into service in 2013. MHI, by getting the country's domestic passenger jet business, which is seen to have high growth potential, off the ground with sales expansion of the MRJ overseas - a feat enabled by its having secured cooperation from entities including trading houses and Nippon Export and Investment Insurance (NEXI) aimed to contribute to this ongoing development of Japan's industries.

Among the major partners in the MRJ program, Pratt & Whitney will supply its most advanced, highly efficient Geared Turbofan? (GTF) engines. Other major companies participating are: Parker Aerospace, to supply the aircraft's hydraulic system; Hamilton Sundstrand Corporation, furnishing various systems, including electrical power, air management and auxiliary power units; Rockwell Collins, providing the flight control computers and avionics; Nabtesco Corporation, to furnish the flight control actuators; and Sumitomo Precision Products Co., Ltd., supplying the landing gear.

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (TSE: 7011, 'MHI'), headquartered in Tokyo, Japan, is one of the world's leading heavy machinery manufacturers, with consolidated sales of 3,068 billion yen in fiscal 2006 (year ended March 31, 2007). MHI's diverse lineup of products and services encompasses shipbuilding, power plants, chemical plants, environmental equipment, steel structures, industrial and general machinery, aircraft, space rocketry and air-conditioning systems.

The Mitsubishi Regional Jet, the first Japanese-made passenger jet, was unveiled on 18 October 2014, about six years after the start of development work in 2008. A ceremony to show off the MRJ was held at the plant of Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., the parent of the aircraft maker, in Toyoyama, Aichi Prefecture. We are unveiling the MRJ after overcoming a lot of difficulties, Mitsubishi Heavy Chairman Hideaki Omiya said at the ceremony. The two companies planned to carry out the MRJs first test flight in April-June 2015 and begin to deliver the jet in April-June 2017, four years later than originally planned.

In December 2015 Mitsubishi Aircraft Corp. pushed back delivery of the first Japanese-made passenger jet by a year, the fourth time it had delayed bringing the Mitsubishi Regional Jet to market. ANA Holdings Inc., the parent company of All Nippon Airways Co., had been expecting the plane in the second quarter of 2017, but the schedule has been pushed back approximately one year.

Our initial expectations were too optimistic, Senior Executive Vice President Nobuo Kishi said. We found that things that we expected to take 10 days to do took 15 days. Tests that we thought we could do 20 times took 40. Mitsubishi Aircraft President Hiromichi Morimoto said the planes frame had passed strength tests for normal use, but there were concerns it wouldnt pass certification tests that check whether the frame can withstand 150 percent of normal use.

Mitsubishi Aircraft had received 407 orders, including options and purchase rights, for its two types of planes, which seat from 78 to 92 passengers. Other customers include SkyWest Inc. and Trans States Airlines Inc. SkyWest, which has ordered 100 MRJs, is the biggest customer for the plane.




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