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Emirati Army - Modernization

The armys main equipment consists of a combination of primarily French- and U.S.-made armored vehicles. The army was reported as of 2007 to be equipped with 469 main battle tanks, 76 light tanks, 113 reconnaissance vehicles, 430 armored infantry fighting vehicles, 860 armored personnel carriers, 93 towed artillery, 181 self-propelled artillery, 72 multiple rocket launchers, 155 mortars, 6 Scud B (up to 20 missiles) surface-to-surface missiles, 305 antitank guided weapons, 262 recoilless launchers, 62 air defense guns, and 40 surface-to-air missiles. The armys armored capability has been enhanced as part of the UAEs military modernization program.

In 2005 the UAE completed a 10-year, US$15 billion program to modernize its armed forces, upgrade its defense capabilities, and acquire modern technology. As a result of these efforts, the country is considered the most rapidly developing military power in the Gulf region. The capability of the newly formed Army Aviation Group was greatly enhanced by 2010 through a US$300 million helicopter upgrade project.

Despite the significance of the military relationship with the United States, the UAE has sought diversification in the procurement of weaponry. France, with whom the UAE has negotiated a defense cooperation agreement, remains a primary source of military matriel, as witness recent purchases of Mirage 20009 combat aircraft and Panhard light armored vehicles. Russia, Germany, and Ukraine are also actual or potential suppliers.

On 21 February 1993, UAE announced that would purchase 390 tropicalized Le Clerc tanks -- and 46 recoveryvehicles and logistic support. Le Clercs will have advanced thermal sights. Training for conversion to the LeClerc began in January 1995, and deliveries of tanks and ammunition will continue through 1999. Package willinclude Giat squadron-level command systems with regimental, command systems under development, and digitally sorted mapping systems within the tank.

France decided to suspend delivery of its "Le Clerc" main battle tank to the UAE in January 2001 because of a dispute over certain terms in the contract. The UAE ordered 390 tanks and 46 recovery vehicles from France's state-owned "Giat industries" in 1993 in a contract valued at the time at US$3.4 billion. But problems emerged concerning certain clauses of the contract that required constant updating of the tanks with the latest technology. The UAE was said to be dissatisfied with the updating and was demanding improvements to the tanks that remain to be delivered. The "Le Clerc" battle tank was already in service with the UAE army and participated in peace-keeping operations in Kosovo alongside the French contingent in the Balkans. Giat industry said in a statement that "there are, in effect, divergences in the interpretation of certain clauses" in the contract with the UAE.

Discussions with the UAE were continuing, but in the mean time the "procedures" for delivering the tanks "are being suspended". The French arms manufacturer was badly in need of the UAE contract as it faced a decline in orders and financial difficulties. Giat was also seeking to sell the "Le Clerc" battle tank to a number of other clients and had been in negotiations with Saudi Arabia for a number of years. The difficulties with the UAE "do not interfere with the ongoing negotiations with other countries interested by the le clerc tank, saudi arabia, greece and turkey," Giat said. The statement added that the tank itself had not been called into question by the UAE. But the suspension of deliveries to the UAE would have an impact on the performance of Giat for the year 2000, when revenues at the group were expected to fall below 4.0 billion francs compared with 5.7 billion francs in 1999.

The army's main equipment in the 1990s consisted of a combination of primarily French- and U.S.-made armored vehicles. The army is reported to be equipped with 469 main battle tanks, 76 light tanks, 113 reconnaissance vehicles (including the acquisition in 2004 of 24 French Panhard scout cars), 430 armored infantry fighting vehicles, 860 armored personnel carriers, 93 towed artillery, 181 self-propelled artillery, 72 multiple rocket launchers, 155 mortars, 6 Scud B (up to 20 missiles) surface-to-surface missiles, 305 antitank guided weapons, 262 recoilless launchers, 62 air defense guns, and 40 surface-to-air missiles.

By 2007 the armys main equipment consists of a combination of primarily French- and U.S.-made armored vehicles. The army is reported to be equipped with 469 main battle tanks, 76 light tanks, 113 reconnaissance vehicles, 430 armored infantry fighting vehicles, 860 armored personnel carriers, 93 towed artillery, 181 self-propelled artillery, 72 multiple rocket launchers, 155 mortars, 6 Scud B (up to 20 missiles) surface-to-surface missiles, 305 antitank guided weapons, 262 recoilless launchers, 62 air defense guns, and 40 surface-to-air missiles. The armys armored capability has been enhanced as part of the UAEs military modernization program. The capability of the newly formed Army Aviation Group was greatly enhanced by 2010 through a US$300 million helicopter upgrade project. The army's armored capability had been enhanced as part of the UAE's military modernization program. By 2012 the U.A.E.'s Land Forces were equipped with several hundred French LeClerc tanks and a similar number of Russian BMP-3 armored fighting vehicles.

In response to the UAE Government request for a High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) package, valued at USD 650 million, U.S. Liaison Office (USLO) presented an LoA to the UAEG on July 1, 2007. The UAE had until September 1 to accept the offer. The HIMARS would afford the UAE a counter battery capability against a ballistic missile threat. The overall objective of our missile defense cooperation is to develop an interoperable, full-spectrum capability in order to provide protection against short range, lower tier and upper tier ballistic missile and air-breathing threats like enemy aircraft and cruise missiles.

The State Department made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to the United Arab Emirates for Apache AH-64E Helicopters and services, as well as related equipment, training, and support. The estimated cost is $3.5 billion. The Defense Security Cooperation Agency delivered the required certification notifying Congress of this possible sale on December 7, 2016.

The Government of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) has requested a possible sale of twenty-eight (28) AH-64E Remanufactured Apache Attack Helicopters; nine (9) new AH-64E Apache Attack Helicopters; Seventy-six (76) T700-GE-701D Engines (56 remanufactured, 18 new, 2 spares); thirty-nine (39) AN/ASQ-170 Modernized Target Acquisition and Designation Sight/AN/AAR-11 Modernized Pilot Night Vision Sensors (28 remanufactured, 9 new, 2 spares); thirty-two (32) remanufactured AN/APR-48B Modernized Radar Frequency Interferometers forty-six (46) AAR-57 Common Missile Warning Systems (31 remanufactured, 9 new, 6 spares); eighty-eight (88) Embedded Global Positioning Systems with Inertial Navigation (72 new, 16 spares); forty-four (44) Manned-Unmanned Teaming-International (MUMTi) systems (28 remanufactured, 9 new, 7 spares); and fifteen (15) new MUMTi System Upper Receivers. This request also includes training devices, helmets, simulators, generators, transportation, wheeled vehicles and organization equipment, spare and repair parts, support equipment, tools and test equipment, technical data and publications, personnel training and training equipment, U.S. government and contractor engineering, technical, and logistics support services, and other related elements of logistics support.

This proposed sale will enhance the foreign policy and national security of the U.S. by helping to improve the security of a friendly country that has been and continues to be an important force for political stability and economic progress in the Middle East.

The proposed sale will improve the UAE's capability to meet current and future threats and provide greater security for its critical infrastructure. The UAE will use the enhanced capability to strengthen its homeland defense. The UAE will have no difficulty absorbing these Apache aircraft into its armed forces. The proposed sale of this equipment and support will not alter the basic military balance in the region.

The prime contractor will be Boeing in Mesa, AZ and Lockheed Martin in Orlando, FL. Offsets are a requirement of doing business in UAE; however offsets are negotiated directly between the Original Equipment Manufactures or other vendors and the UAE government and details were not initially known. Implementation of this proposed sale will not require the assignment of contractor representatives to the UAE.



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