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Qatar Emiri Air Force (QEAF) Air and Missile Defense

Patriots were deployed to Qatar in fall 2006 to support the 15th Asian Games in Doha. Protection was primarily for U.S. Forces at Al Udaid and Camp As Sayliyah, but also covered a large portion of Doha and some (not all) critical infrastructure. On October 15, 2007, a routine test sequence resulted in the accidental launch of a Patriot Missile from a battery at Camp As-Saylieh. The missile landed on the Qatari Chief of Staff's farm a few kilometers from Camp As-Saylieh, with no injuries or property damage. U.S.-Qatari cooperation on the investigation was good and the Qataris appreciated that ADM Fallon responded quickly to their request to stand both batteries down and physically remove missiles from the launchers.

The Qataris originally signaled that they would agree to putting the Patriot batteries back up, but first asked for the full report on the incident, temporary rules of engagement, and an analysis of the Patriots' coverage area to ensure that the city of Doha is covered and not just the military bases. Completion of the final report took longer than expected, but was briefed to senior Qatari military officers. In early September 2008, the Government of Qatar sought to establish strategic-level rules of engagement (as opposed to tactical procedures) on exactly when, where, and how the Patriots may be used.

CENTCOM and AFCENT were concerned about the ramifications and precedence set by entering into such discussions. We believe that the delay in the return to operational status likely boiled down to Qatari sovereignty concerns and, perhaps, a desire for some form of role in granting permission or approval prior to firing missiles. Meanwhile, Qatar was aggressively pursuing FMS information on an integrated air defense system which includes, among other systems, Patriot-PAC 3. Additionally, Qatar was aware that its neighbors Bahrain and UAE were in the process of receiving one each Patriot battery as part of an enhanced air defense posture for U.S. Forces in the region.

Qatar expressed interest three times between 1999 and 2010 in purchasing elements of a missile defense system, including PATRIOT, only to back away after significant time and expense was invested by both them and the US. The third round of interest began in June 2008 with six Letters of Request for Price and Availability (PnA) data on PATRIOT, THAAD, MEADS, SL-AMRAAM; a site survey and defense analysis; and for a bilateral working group. The working group met throughout the fall of 2008 but progress ultimately halted after Qatar refused to fund a site survey (required under the FMS process). Movement began again in September 2009 with DSCA agreeing to provide PnA data for PATRIOT per the 2008 LOR, but Qatar still balked at funding a survey. There is more to this than met the eye: some of Qatar's intransigence was likely due to bargaining, but also to insecurity as it wished, as Qatar saw it, to be treated the same as Kuwait and UAE, with whom the US apparently shared some initial IADS costs.

The US Defense Security Cooperation Agency notified Congress 06 November 2012 of a possible Foreign Military Sale to the Government of Qatar for the sale of 11 PATRIOT Configuration-3 Modernized Fire Units and associated equipment, parts, training and logistical support for an estimated cost of $9.9 billion. The Government of Qatar has requested a possible sale of 11 PATRIOT Configuration-3 Modernized Fire Units, 11 AN/MPQ-65 Radar Sets, 11 AN/MSQ-132 Engagement Control Systems, 30 Antenna Mast Groups, 44 M902 Launching Stations, 246 PATRIOT MIM-104E Guidance Enhanced Missile-TBM (GEM-T) with canisters, 2 PATRIOT MIM-104E GEM-T Test Missiles, 768 PATRIOT Advanced Capability 3 (PAC-3) Missiles with canisters, 10 PAC-3 Test Missiles with canisters, 11 Electrical Power Plants (EPPII), 8 Multifunctional Information Distribution Systems/Low Volume Terminals (MIDS/LVTs), communications equipment, tools and test equipment, support equipment, publications and technical documentation, personnel training and training equipment, spare and repair parts, facility design, U.S. Government and contractor technical, engineering, and logistics support services, and other related elements of logistics and program support.

The US Defense Security Cooperation Agency notified Congress 02 November 2012 of a possible Foreign Military Sale to the Government of Qatar for two Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) Fire Units and associated equipment, parts, training and logistical support for an estimated cost of $6.5 billion. The Government of Qatar has requested a possible sale of 2 Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) Fire Units, 12 THAAD Launchers, 150 THAAD Interceptors, 2 THAAD Fire Control and Communications, 2 AN/TPY-2 THAAD Radars, and 1 Early Warning Radar (EWR). Also included are fire unit maintenance equipment, prime movers (trucks), generators, electrical power units, trailers, communications equipment, tools, test and maintenance equipment, repair and return, system integration and checkout, spare/repair parts, publications and technical documentation, personnel training and training equipment, U.S. Government and contractor technical and logistics personnel support services, and other related support elements.

On 29 July 2013 the US Defense Security Cooperation Agency notified Congress of a possible Foreign Military Sale to Qatar of one (1) A/N FPS-132 Block 5 Early Warning Radar (EWR) and associated equipment, parts, training and logistical support for an estimated cost of $1.1 billion. The Government of Qatar requested a possible sale of one (1) A/N FPS-132 Block 5 Early Warning Radar (EWR) to include Prime Mission Equipment package, technical and support facilities, communication equipment, encryption devices, spare and repair parts, support and test equipment, publications and technical documentation, publications and technical documentation, personnel training and training equipment, U.S Government and contractor engineering, technical and logistics support services; and related elements of logistics and program support.

This proposed sale will contribute to the foreign policy and national security of the United States by helping to improve the security of a friendly country that has been, and continues to be, an important force for political stability and economic progress in the Middle East. This proposed sale will help strengthen U.S. efforts to promote regional stability by enhancing regional defense to a key U.S. ally. The acquisition of this air defense system would provide a permanent defensive capability to the Qatar Peninsula as well as protection of the economic infrastructure and well-being of Qatar. The proposed sale will help strengthen Qatars capability to counter current and future threats in the region and reduce dependence on U.S. forces. Qatar will have no difficulty absorbing this radar system into its armed forces. The proposed sale of this equipment and support will not alter the basic military balance in the region. The principal contractor will be Raytheon Company in Woburn, Massachusetts.



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