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FV 4333 Stormer

Based on the Alvis Scorpion CVR(T) model, the Stormer (a stretched Spartan) was a further development primarily for export. In 1980, Alvis [now BAE Systems Land Systems] purchased the manufacturing and marketing rights of the FV4333 from the British Ministry of Defence. The vehicle was originally designed by the Military Vehicles and Engineering Establishment (which no longer exists as such), with the first prototype made a brief appearance at the mobility demonstration at Bovington during the 1978 British Army Equipment Exhibition. In June 1981, Alvis announced that its development of the FV4333 had been designated Stormer. Production of the Stomer family has been completed and the vehicle is no longer being marketed by BAE Systems Land Systems.

The Stormer took advantage of the existing technology of the now BAE Systems Land Systems Scorpion CVR(T) family and many of the proven components have been used. The hull of the Stormer is wider than the CVR(T) and its original gasoline engine was replaced by a Cummins or Perkins Engines Company turbocharged diesel engine. In order to achieve a higher usable space and payload capacity, the vehicle was added in addition to various minor changes to a running roller at 6 and is provided with a circuit-efficient engine. The vehicle length has been increased from 4.36 m to 5.27 m.

The Stormer, like its Scorpion counterpart, can be adapted to serve a variety of battlefield and peacetime roles. The Alvis Stormer Starstreak is one such adaptation, capable of mounting 8 Starstreak High Velocity Missiles in the air defense role. Other duties for this weapons system include ambulance, battlefield recovery and command and control - not to mention its original armored personnel carrier role. The tracked Stormer vehicle provides a mobile platform for the Starstreak High Velocity Missile (HVM) system giving the detachment protection and excellent mobility with eight ready to fire missiles and a further nine stowed inside. The HVM system is a low level Close Air Defence (CAD) system with a rapid engagement capacity developed and optimised to counter the Attack Helicopter threat. This highly flexible system is also capable of being fired using the Lightweight Multiple Launcher or from the shoulder. The missile employs a system of three dart type projectiles which can make multiple hits on the target. Each of these darts has an explosive warhead. The system is fitted with a roof-mounted Air Defence Alerting Device, providing target detection and prioritisation. A panoramic weapon sight is located at the front right of the vehicle.

The Shielder Anti-Tank System gives commanders the facility to create anti-tank barriers quickly and effectively. The system consists of modular dispensers which can be fired to either side or to the rear, mounted on a flat bed version of the Stormer Armoured Personnel Carrier. The anti-tank mines have a programmable life, at the end of which they self-destruct. Shielder will only lay anti-tank mines - The British Army does not use anti-personnel mines. These mines are carried in canisters, (each of which hold six mines) with up to 40 canisters on a launcher rack. These are on the rear of the Stormer flatbed and discharge the anti-tank mines either side as the vehicle moves across the terrain. A dispenser control unit provides fire signals, testing and arming of the self-destruct mechanism.

FV4333 StormerArmored Personnel Carrier
Country of Origin United Kingdom
Manufacturer BAe Systems Land Systems, Telford, UK
Initial Year of Service 1981
Production ??
Focus Model FV4333 Stormer
Crew 3 + 8
Overall Length 17.29ft (5.27m)
Width 9.06ft (2.76m)
Height 7.45ft (2.27m)
Weight 14.0 US Short Tons (12,700kg; 27,999lbs)
Powerplant 1 x Perkins T6/3544
water-cooled 6-cylinder turbo-charged diesel
250 hp @ 2,600 rpm.
Maximum Speed 50mph (80 km/h)
Maximum Range 404 miles (650 km)
NBC Protection Optional
Nightvision Optional <




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