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ERJ 145 Regional Jet Family

The ERJ 145 is a twin jet-powered regional aircraft accommodating up to 50 passengers. The ERJ 145 regional jet family allows for standardized pilot certification and maintenance procedures. This jet was developed in response to the increasing demand from the regional airline industry for an aircraft that offered more speed, comfort and capacity than a turboprop. The ERJ 145 was certified by the Brazilian aviation authority in November 1996, the FAA in December 1996, the European aviation authority in May 1997, the Australian aviation authority in June 1998 and the Chinese aviation authority in December 2000. We began delivering the ERJ 145 in December 1996. In October 2007, Embraer delivered the 1000th ERJ 145 aircraft, manufactured at Harbin Embraer Aircraft Industry Co. Ltd. to the HNA Group.

At the end of the 1980s, the global market showed the need for aircraft with an average number of 50 seats, and more advanced technology than the turboprops’. Due to this demand, in 1989 Embraer began to develop a 50-passenger jet aircraft. Also in that year, the EMB 145, the first jetliner to be produced by Embraer, was officially introduced during the Paris Air Show, with the promise of dominating the medium-sized aircraft sector in the decades to follow.

The development of the ERJ 145 aircraft was partially based on the EMB 120 Brasília and has approximately 30% commonality in terms of parts and components with that aircraft, including the nose section and cabin. The ERJ 145 has a maximum cruising speed of Mach .78, or 450 knots, and a maximum fully loaded range of 1,060 nautical miles in its standard version. The ERJ 145 is equipped with engines built by Rolls-Royce Allison. These engines are designed to operate 10,000 flight hours between major overhauls and operate at a low fuel cost. In addition, the ERJ 145 is equipped with sophisticated flight instruments, such as engine-indication instruments, crew-alert systems and digital flight control systems, produced by Honeywell.

Despite the ambitious objective, the project was almost cast aside because of the crisis Embraer was going through. In 1991, however, the project was reactivated, and in the same year, studies to implement some changes were set in motion. The airplane was designed for high levels of landings and takeoffs, and for operating effectively on short runways. As there was not enough capital to manufacture the aircraft, Embraer resorted to international partnerships in the form of risk sharing, where the partner companies assume the risk of supplying parts and make a profit only if the product is successful. Several major companies were interested in the aircraft, which allowed the continuation of the project.

The crisis situation led to the privatization of Embraer in 1994. With its new status, the Company changed direction and started up an intense process of internal restructuring, including the adoption of strategies aimed at new aviation niches in the market, and the EMB 145 became the great promise of the new phase of the Company. In the same year, the new aircraft began to be assembled, and in August 1995, it had its first official flight and rollout. The first unit in a series of pressurized jets for regional transport was delivered in 1996 to the North American company Continental Express. In 1998, the EMB 145 adopted the abbreviation ERJ 145 (for Embraer Regional Jet). In the same year, Embraer delivered the 50th ERJ 145. In 2002, Varig began to operate the ERJ 145 on the Rio de Janeiro– São Paulo shuttle flight, the most profitable trade route in the country. It was the first time that this route would have a national airplane.

In 1997, the manufacturing of the ERJ 145 was transferred to Botucatu, and the Company developed aircraft with similar features by using the “family” concept, a strategy of routine standardization that delivers benefits such as cost reduction in the development of new projects and maintenance.

In 2002, the Company opened its first plant overseas, in China, the result of a joint venture with Harbin Aircraft, for producing the ERJ 145 regional jet. The following year, the first Chinese ERJ 145 was produced. The success of the ERJ 145 aircraft became the symbol of a new Embraer—guided by the integrated management of market intelligence, design, production and post-sales support—and placed it among the world's major companies in the sector. In 2009, more than 1,100 aircraft based on this platform were flying under many different colors on all continents.

ERJ 140 LR XR

The ERJ 145 is also available in a long-range, or LR, version, and, in response to customer requests, Embraer developed an extra-long-range, or XR, version of the aircraft. The ERJ 145 LR features a larger fuel tank, more powerful engines and greater range than the standard version. The ERJ 145 LR, which was certified by the Brazilian aviation authority, the FAA and the European aviation authority in 1998, and by the Chinese aviation authority in November 2000, used engines that deliver 15% more thrust, allowing the fully loaded aircraft to operate on routes of up to 1,550 nautical miles. Deliveries of the ERJ 145 LR began in February 1998.

The ERJ 145 XR is a 50-passenger extra-long-range jet—the XR abbreviation stands for this feature—and was especially designed for the U.S. market. It was built on the ERJ 145 platform, and its main visual difference from the models that preceded it in the ERJ 145/135/140 family is the use of winglets, an aerodynamic device that decreases the turbulence generated at the wing tips, thereby reducing fuel consumption and providing greater range for the aircraft. The ERJ 145 XR featured a new and updated turbofan engine and increased capacity fuel tanks. It was launched in 2000 and took its maiden flight on June 29, 2001. The ERJ 145 XR, which was certified by the Brazilian aviation authority in August 2002 and by the FAA in October 2002, offers reduced fuel consumption, a maximum, fully loaded range of 2,000 nautical miles and enhanced operational capabilities for hot weather and high altitudes. In November 2002, immediately after the certification of the ERJ 145 XR by the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), deliveries of the first units to ExpressJet Airlines of Houston, Texas, began.

ERJ 135

The success of the ERJ 145, launched in 1996, heralded a new phase for Embraer. Next, seeking to meet the needs of its customers, Embraer identified a market demand for jets for up to 40 passengers for low-density routes, and so, still in 1996, it started the ERJ 135 project (EMB 135 at the time), based on the "family" concept, a strategy of routine standardization that delivers benefits such as cost reduction in the development of new projects and maintenance. The rollout of the ERJ 135 and its maiden flight occurred in 1998. It obtained CTA and FAA certification in 1999 and, in the same year, it began to operate. In February 2000, Embraer announced at the Singapore Aerospace Tradeshow that Continental Express had ordered this aircraft. The ERJ 135 was broadly accepted by the market.

The ERJ 135 is a 37-seat regional jet based on the same design as the ERJ 145 and is manufactured on the same production line. The ERJ 135 has approximately 96% commonality in terms of parts and components with the ERJ 145, resulting in reduced spare parts requirements and permitting the utilization of the same ground support equipment for customers that use both aircraft. The ERJ 135 was certified by the Brazilian aviation authority in June 1999, by the FAA in July 1999 and by the European aviation authority in October 1999. Deliveries of the ERJ 135 began in July 1999.

The ERJ 135 has a maximum operating speed of Mach .78, or 450 knots, and a maximum fully loaded range of 1,330 nautical miles in its standard version. The ERJ 135 uses the same engines, sophisticated flight instruments, digital flight control systems and body design as the ERJ 145. The ERJ 135's fuselage is 11.6 feet shorter than the ERJ 145's. The ERJ 135 is also available in a LR version, with maximum fully loaded range of l,700 nautical miles. The LR version received certification simultaneously with the standard version and began deliveries in August 1999.

ERJ 140

Embraer developed the ERJ 140 in response to customer requests. The success of the ERJ 145, launched in 1996, had heralded a new phase for Embraer. Next, seeking to meet the needs of its customers, Embraer identified a market demand for jets for up to 40 passengers for low-density routes, and so, still in 1996, it started the ERJ 135 project (EMB 135 at the time), based on the "family" concept, which would officially be launched in 1998. At that time, research unveiled the need for jets with the capacity for 44 seats, and at the end of 1999, Embraer began to develop a new jet in the same family — the ERJ 140.

The maiden flight of the aircraft took place on June 27, 2000. The ERJ 140 was certified by the Brazilian aviation authority in June 2001 and by the FAA in July 2001. In September 2000, American Eagle became the first ERJ 140 customer, and deliveries of the aircraft started in August 2001, after obtaining the Type Certificate from the Brazilian and North American authorities.

The ERJ 140 is a 44-seat regional jet based on the same design as the ERJ 135 and is manufactured on the same production line as the ERJ 145 and ERJ 135. The ERJ 140 has approximately 96% commonality with the ERJ 145 and ERJ 135, providing customers with significant maintenance and operational benefits. The ERJ 140 has a maximum fully loaded range of 1,230 nautical miles in its standard version. The ERJ 140 is available in LR version, with maximum fully loaded range of 1,630 nautical miles. We began delivering the ERJ 140 in July 2001.

Legacy 600

The Legacy is an executive aircraft, developed based on the ERJ 135 regional jet platform. The Legacy, which was officially launched on July 26, 2000 at the Farnborough Air Show in the United Kingdom is available in executive, corporate and authority transport versions. During the official launching ceremony of the Legacy at Farnborough, the first contract, worth approximately US$ 1 billion, was announced with Swift Aviation of the United States, which acquired 50 aircraft of this type, comprising 25 firm orders and 25 options. In December 2000, the Legacy order backlog totaled 62 aircraft, including 31 firm orders and 31 options.

The Legacy 600 was designed to provide customers with a cost-effective alternative to airline travel. Embraer offers the Legacy 600 in two versions: executive and corporate shuttle. The executive version features a highly customized interior based on the customer's specific requirements. The corporate shuttle version is partially customized and is generally intended to have business class-type seating and in-flight office design features. Both versions have a maximum cruising speed of Mach .8, or 470 knots.

Embraer developed the Legacy 600 by building upon regional jet design and manufacturing experience. For example, with the exception of the interior of the aircraft, the fuel tank, controller and indication system and the winglets, the Legacy 600 has the same components as the ERJ 135 and is capable of being manufactured on the same production line. Furthermore, the corporate shuttle version of the Legacy 600 does not require separate FAA, European aviation authority or Brazilian aviation authority approval. The executive version of the Legacy 600 was certified by the Brazilian aviation authority in December 2001, by the JAA in July 2002 and by the FAA in August 2002.

The Legacy 600 continues to be enhanced to further strengthen its competitiveness in the market, offering even more space and comfort to passengers. The cabin height now measures 6 feet (1.82 meter). The taller cabin, a slimmer valance and redesigned seats enhance comfort and space throughout three distinct zones, a unique feature in the super midsize category. The new Legacy 600 seats and divan feature a seamless berthing for sleep or relaxation. In addition, the jet has a new galley, forward lavatory external service, Bose cockpit headsets, and an auxiliary audio input that will allow cabin sound integration.



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