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Hog Island Type B (Design 1024) / AP-4 Argonne

Two basic designs were to be fabricated at the Hog Island yard, both to be collectively known as "Hog Islanders". Hog Island Standard Fabricated Type A freighter was Emergency Fleet Corporation Design 1022. Hog Island Standard Fabricated Type B passenger ship was Emergency Fleet Corporation Design 1024. The Type A design was a cargo carrier and the Type B was designed to transport troops. Both were simple designs geared toward mass production and aesthetic considerations were ignored. The hulls had no sheer and were syrnmetrical from the sides, resulting in some of the uglier ships to sail the seas.

The Shohola was built in 1919 by the American International Shipbuilding Corporation, Hog Island, Penn. She was a 7,430 gross ton ship, length overall 448ft x beam 58.2ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw and a speed of 17 knots. Originally launched on 27/10/1919 as the US Army Transport CANTIGNY, she went to the American Merchant Line in 1924 and was renamed AMERICAN BANKER. She was transferred to the United States Line in 1931 and sold to the Antwerp Navigation Co. (Belgium) in 1940 and renamed VILLE D'ANVERS. She was sold in 1946 to the Isbrandtsen Line (Honduras) and renamed CITY OF ATHENS. Sold to Panamanian Lines (Panama) in 1948 and renamed PROTEA. Sold to the Arosa Line in 1952 and renamed AROSA KLUM. She was completely refitted with greatly increased passenger capacity and her displacement rose to 8,929 tons. Her first voyage as AROSA KLUM was from Bremen to Halifax on March18, 1952. The Arosa Line was founded in 1952 as the Compania Internacional Transportadera of Panama, but was really Swiss owned. Their first sailing was for Halifax via Zeebrugge and Southampton was by the newly reconditioned AROSA KLUM. In 1958, the company experienced financial diffuculties and was later declared bankrupt and the AROSA KLUM was attached by customs officials to satisfy the demands of creditors. "Arrested" for debt at Plymouth, England, in December, 1958, she was broken up at Ghent in 1959.

The Skanawono was a 7,430 gross ton ship, length 436.9ft x beam 58.2ft, one funnel, two masts, single screw, speed 15 knots, accommodation for 80-tourist class passengers. Built by the American International Shipbuilding Corp., Hog Island, Penn, (engines by General Electric Co., Schenectady, NY), she was launched on 6th July 1920 as the U.S Army Transport TOURS. In 1924 she was renamed AMERICAN SHIPPER for the American Merchant Line., fitted for 12-1st class passengers and started her first New York - London voyage on 3rd April 1924. In 1926 her passenger accommodation was increased to 80-tourist class and in 1931 she transferred to United States Lines.

USS Argonne, one of twelve 8,400-ton Hog Island Type B (Design 1024) transports built at Hog Island, Pennsylvania, was laid down in November 1918 as the U.S. Shipping Board's Sinsinawa, launched in February 1920 as the Army's Argonne, and delivered a few months later. Excess to Army needs, she was loaned to the Navy and commissioned in November 1921. Argonne served the Navy as a transport (AP-4) until selected in 1924 for conversion to a submarine tender. She was redesignated AS-10 in July 1924 and transferred from Army to Navy ownership in August. Returning to full commission in March 1926 after conversion, she was assigned to support the Navy's three newest large submarines, V-1, V-2 and V-3. In January 1931 Argonne became flagship for Commander Base Force, U.S. Fleet, which involved providing support to many types of the the Fleet's units, particularly smaller vessels such as minesweepers and tugs. She also carried a photographic laboratory for photo-triangulation of fleet gunnery exercises and, between April and August 1933, took part in the Aleutian Islands Surveying Expedition. Argonne again visited New York with the Fleet in June 1934 and helped withdraw Marines from Haiti in August. In July 1940 she was reclassified AG-31 to reflect the duties she had been carrying out since 1931.

USS Chaumont, one of twelve 13,400-ton (displacement) Hog Island Type B (Design 1024) transports built for the U. S. Shipping Board at Hog Island, Pennsylvania, was laid down in November 1918 as the Shipping Board's Shope, launched in March 1920 as the U.S. Army's Chaumont, and completed a few months later. Excess to Army needs, she was transferred to the Navy and commissioned in November 1921. From her home port at San Francisco, Chaumont commenced a career of trans-Pacific troop service that initially consisted of voyages between California and Manila via Honolulu. Selected in March 1943 for conversion to a hospital ship, Chaumont was decommissioned in August at Seattle. She returned to active service in March 1944 as Samaritan (AH-10) and retained that name and designation until she was sold for scrapping in early 1948. The ship was 448' long, with a beam of 58'3", a draft of 26'5" and a speed of 14 knots with a complement of 286.

USS Argonne, one of twelve 8,400-ton Hog Island Type B (Design 1024) transports built at Hog Island, Pennsylvania, was laid down in November 1918 as the U.S. Shipping Board's Sinsinawa, launched in February 1920 as the Army's Argonne, and delivered a few months later. Excess to Army needs, she was loaned to the Navy and commissioned in November 1921. Argonne served the Navy as a transport (AP-4) until selected in 1924 for conversion to a submarine tender. She was redesignated AS-10 in July 1924 and transferred from Army to Navy ownership in August.

The first Wright (AZ-1) was originally the unnamed "hull no. 680" laid down at Hog Island, Pennsylvania, by the American International Shipbuilding Corporation under a United States Shipping Board contract. Named Wright on 20 April 1920, the ship was launched on 28 April. A little over two months later, the Navy signed a contract with the Tietjen and Lang Dry Dock Co. of Hoboken, NJ, to convert the ship to a unique type of auxiliary vessel-a "lighter-than-air aircraft tender." On 17 July 1920, the ship received that classification and was designated AZ-1. Reclassified 1944 as AG-79, Wright was renamed San Clemente on 1 February 1945 to allow the name Wright to be reassigned to CV-47.



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Page last modified: 22-07-2011 17:39:37 ZULU