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Hypersonic Conventional Strike Weapon (HCSW)

The Hypersonic Conventional Strike Weapon (HCSW) program's objective is to design, develop and integrate an air-launched hypersonic conventional strike weapon on both fighter and bomber aircraft platforms, The HCSW will provide a prompt (Hypersonic / Hypervelocity), precision strike capability against high-value, time-critical fixed and relocatable surface targets in a single or multi-theater challenged (A2/AD) environment.

Standoff missiles are long-range weapons designed to be fired from distances sufficient to enable their carriers to avoid enemy defensive fire. Flying at speeds of Mach 5 or above, hypersonic weapons are a next-generation weapons technology designed to defeat existing and prospective air and missile defense systems.

HCSW is one of several USAF hypersonic prototyping efforts, another being the Air Launched Rapid Response Weapon, a $258 million project for two other prototyping experiments. The service is also working with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) on two experimental hypersonic projects: the Tactical Boost Glide program and the Hypersonic Air-breathing Weapon Concept.

The HCSW will provide a prompt (Hypersonic/Hypervelocity), precision strike capability against high-value, time-critical fixed and relocatable surface targets in a single or multi-theater challenged (A2/AD) environment. It will utilize Global Position System (GPS)/Inertial Guidance System (INS) for navigation and terminal guidance with a Government Furnished Equipment (GFE) warhead.

The Hypersonic Conventional Strike Weapon (HCSW) Program is a SECAF directed effort to rapidly field a quick response hypersonic strike capability, with a Critical Design Review (CDR) occurring twenty four (24) months after contract award (end of FY19). The competition for the HCSW contract will be limited to the group of five (5) sources that the Government had determined to have the unique capabilities necessary to meet the Government's requirements and avoid unacceptable delay: Boeing (Phantom Works, Boeing Defense, Space & Security), Lockheed Martin (Space Systems Company), Northrop Grumman Systems Corporation (Aerospace Systems), Raytheon Company (Missile Systems), and Orbital ATK (Arizona, Launch Systems Division).

A sources sought synopsis was issued on 29 June 2017, Solicitation Number FA8682-18-R-0003, requesting vendors provide capabilities statements demonstrating their capabilities in accomplishing systems integration of all the elements of a hypersonic, conventional air-launched, strike weapon from existing fighter/bomber aircraft and all respective operations/mission planning and sustainment efforts to include operational safety, suit abilit y, and effectiveness. The Government further stated, qualified vendors must be skilled in design, qualification, component/subsystem testing of the critical elements of the hypersonic missile in representative operational conditions. Lastly, the Government stated qualified vendors must be capable in the following fields: hypersonic aerodynamics, aero-thermal protection systems, solid rocket motors, warhead/missile integration, advanced hypersonic guidance, advanced hypersonic guidance, navigation, and contractor, and aircraft integration,

Twelve (12) companies submitted capabilities packages in response to the sources sought. The HCSW program office analyzed all of the responses against the criteria in the sources sought, which revealed that only Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon Missile Systems, and Orbital ATK (Arizona) have the unique capabilities required to meet the Government's requirements.

The seven (7) remaining companies who provided capabilities statements were determined unqu alified to meet the Government 's requirements without unacceptable delay given that each company failed to demonstrate one or more of the capabilities required to be considered a capable source. None of the seven (7) remaining companies possessed all elements required to rapidly develop, integrate, test and field a hypersonic weapon system in the required time, In some cases they did not demonstrate any ability in handling hypersonic systems, guidance or control of hypersonic systems, or high temperature materials. Others did not show capability in handling warheads, fuzes, solid rocket motors, or did not show capability in integrating systems on military fighter/bomber aircraft. Most did not demonstrate ability to perform as a prime systems integrator or did not offer a system that would meet the requirements of the program.

The HCSW program is assigned to the Air Force Program Executive Officer for Weapons (AFPEO/WP). The Air Force Materiel Command, Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Long Range Systems Division (AFLCMC/EBJ), Eglin AFB FL 32542-6807 is the contracting activity for the 13 September 2017 Justification and Approval (J&A) for Other Than Full and Open Competition. This J&A supports a single-award Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contract in support of Hypersonic Conventional Strike Weapon (HCSW) requirements to be issued without full and open competition. The two key discriminators for a capable HCSW source were current/ existing Hypersonics expertise and access to Hypersonics technologies. The capable sources had spent years/decades developing their Hypersonics expertise and technology and cannot be duplicated by a new source during the development schedule for HCSW.

Additionally, while Hypersonics experience is certainly the most unique expertise required, there were numerous other capabilities that any potential offeror must possess in order to be capable to perform the Government's HCSW requirements and, therefore, be considered a capable source. For example, candidate sources must also be able to demonstrate the ability to integrate warheads, fuzes, and solid rocket motors into complete weapon systems, demonstrate the ability to integrate weapon systems for carriage and release on fighter/bomber aircraft, and demonstrate the ability to perform as a prime systems integrator. Candidate sources must also know systems integration of all elements of conventional air-launched, stand off weapons from an combat aircraft, and all respective operations/mission planning and sustainment effo11s to include operational safety, suitability, and effectiveness.

The capable sources have already executed hundreds of millions of dollars and have decades of experience with Hypersonic systems. A new source would require a minimum of five (5) to seven (7) years to achieve and demonstrate thr eshold capabilities required to be considered a capable source for the HCSW requirements, The program office intends to award a contract by Januaty 2018 and performance of all EMD activities is estimated to be a 60 month development schedule. In other words, any other potential sources would be unable to qualify to compete for the HCSW contract until after the anticipated HCSW contract activity is complete or nearly complete. Additionally, the AF does not have the funding necessary to fund the development of another capable source or to carry two or more sources through EMD and down select to one source.

Boeing, Lockheed Martin , Northrop Grumman, Raytheon Missile Systems, and Orbital ATK (Arizona) are uniquely qualified to provide the HCSW requirements: These are the only sources the Government identified that could support the Government's delive1y schedule. These companies either own, or have access to, existing mature technologies that could be leveraged to accelerate the HCSW program. They have developed multiple M&S tools and abilities to aid in the design and accomplish trades for design in the hypersonic realm, including tools for thermal modeling, signature assessments, and weapons effectiveness; they have designed, developed, and flight tested hypersonic ballistic/maneuvering payload vehicles and hypersonic targets; they have extensive experience with solid rocket motorsand some have the ability to mix and cast their own rocket grain formulations; they have integrated missiles onto fighter and bomber airc raft. Given the time sensitivity of the requirement, award to any other source would result in an unacceptable delay to the Government.

It was anticipated that the IDIQ contract (Developmental Planning through Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD)) would be awarded as a result of limited competition in the 1st quarter of FY18. Task Orders against the IDIQ contract would be awarded on a noncompetitive basis. The contracting activity would determine the most appropriate contract type at the time of Task Order award using established business/ contract clearance procedures. The ordering period for the planned IDIQ is approximately 60 months.

The Government conducted a limited source selection to make one award to one contractor to design, develop, and integrate an air-launched HCSW and provide programmatic, engineering, and system engineering effo1ts leading to a successful CDR within 24 months after contract award. Efforts will include systems integration of all the elements of a hypersonic, conventional air-launched, stand-off weapon from an existing aircraft and all respective operations/mission planning and sustainment efforts to include operational safety, suitability, and effectiveness. Effo11s also include the design, qualification, and component/subsystem testing of the critical elements of the hypersonic missile in representative operational conditions in preparation for the CDR. In addition, the requirement is to complete EMD to support Early Operational Capability (EOC) by FY22.

Lockheed Martin was selected 19 April 2018 to design and prototype a new air-launched hypersonic cruise missile for the US Air Force. The IDIQ (indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity) contract, dubbed Hypersonic Conventional Strike Weapon, has no specified timeline, but is valued at as much as $928 million. The Long Range Systems Division (AFLCMC/EBJ) solicited proposals from limited sources to awarded contract for the development and integration of an air-launched hypersonic conventional strike weapon (HCSW) with both fighter and bomber aircraft platforms.

Only Boeing, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, Orbital ATK or Raytheon could produce the weapon within the USAFs timeframe, according to a 21 July notice of contract action on the US Federal Business Opportunities website.

This contract provides for the design, development, engineering, systems integration, test, logistics planning, and aircraft integration support of all the elements of a hypersonic, conventional, air-launched, stand-off weapon. Work will be performed in Huntsville, Alabama. This award is the result of a competitive acquisition and three offers were received. Fiscal 2018 research, development, test and evaluation funds will be obligated at the time of award on the first task order. Air Force Life Cycle Management, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, is the contracting activity (FA8682-18-D-0003).

Lockheed is tasked with the "design, development, engineering, systems integration, test, logistics planning, and aircraft integration support of all the elements of a hypersonic, conventional, air-launched stand-off weapon," according to Defense Department statement. The contract will include all necessary effort through Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD).




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