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US ARMY INFANTRY OFFICER

TACTICAL DOCTRINE, PART II, (Defense)

SUBCOURSE NO. IN0822

US ARMY INFANTRY SCHOOL
FORT BENNING, GEORGIA

5 Credit Hours

GENERAL

The purpose of this subcourse is to develop the infantry officer's knowledge of tactical defensive operations. It covers the planning and preparation for the defense, deep and security operations, reserve and rear operations, and retrograde operations. The subcourse will also cover the various types of joint operations.

TASK: Prepare a company/company team defense position and battle plan. Conduct a company/company team withdrawal, delay with and without enemy pressure, plan and conduct relief operations, identify the standard arrangements for joint operations.

CONDITIONS: Given the subcourse material, a training scenario and extracts, as applicable, the student will complete the examination at the end of the subcourse.

STANDARD: The student will successfully answer 70% of the questions on a multiple-choice based examination for IN0822 Tactical Doctrine, Part II (Defense).

This objective supports Military Qualifications Standard (MQS) Manual task:

Prepare a company/company team battle position.

Prepare a company/company team defensive plan.

Conduct a company/company team delay or withdrawal under enemy pressure.

Conduct a company/company team withdrawal not under enemy pressure.

Plan and conduct relief operations.

Identify the standard arrangements for joint operations and general considerations for combined and contingency operation.

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION
 
LESSON 1: FUNDAMENTALS OF DEFENSE
  Learning Event 1: Identify the purpose and characteristics of defensive operations.
  Learning Event 2: Identify alternate defensive patterns and the framework for defensive operations.
  Practice Exercise
LESSON 2: CONDUCTING DEFENSIVE OPERATIONS
  Learning Event 1: Identify the considerations and techniques for planning, preparing, and conducting defensive operations.
  Learning Event 2: Identify the types of and considerations and techniques for planning, preparing, and conducting retrograde operations.
  Learning Event 3: Plan and conduct relief operations.
  Learning Event 4: Identify the standing arrangements for joint operations and general considerations for combined and contingency operations.
  Practice Exercise
IN0822 Edition A Examination  

 

INTRODUCTION

The objective of war is "...the preservation of oneself and the annihilation of the enemy..." --Mao Tse-Tung. This objective is achieved by the armed forces through the use of offensive military operations. However, it is probable that both opposing forces will, at some time during a conflict, be required to conduct defensive operations.

The fundamentals of defensive operations are the same, regardless of the size of the organization. How they are applied depends on the capabilities of the organization and the scope of the operation.

Defensive and offensive operations may occur at the same time. A corps may conduct an offensive operation while a platoon defends a key piece of terrain. Conversely, the corps may be conducting an overall defense, while an infantry platoon, as a part of a larger task force, attacks to seize a key piece of terrain vital to the corps defense.

As with the offense, sound planning is the key to a successful defense. Plans must be made to cover the expected main battle area. In addition, provisions must be made for deep operations in the enemy's rear area, security operations to inform commanders of the enemy's current situation, the employment of reserves, and the security of the defender's rear area.

A retrograde operation is a movement to the rear or away from the enemy. The operation may be forced or voluntary, but, in either case, the higher commander must approve it. Retrograde operations gain time, preserve forces, avoid combat under undesirable conditions, or draw the enemy into unfavorable positions. All commanders and staff officers should understand the types of retrograde operations and how they are conducted.

Joint and combined commands are unique command structures. Commanders of Army units must understand special command relationships and standardized or special operating procedures if the units are to be effective elements of joint or combined commands. This may be especially true when Army units are directed by National Command Authorities to conduct contingency operations overseas in support of national policy.