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5th Brigade, 78th Division (Training Support)
"We Dare"

The 5th Brigade, 78th Division (Training Support) was inactivated in 2009 as part of the reorganization of the 78th Division (Training Support) to the 78th Training Brigade.

The 5th Brigade, 78th Division (Training Support)'s mission was to synchronize, coordinate, and execute training support and evaluations for Reserve units within it's geographical area of responsibility. 5th Brigade, 78th Division (Training Support) increased the combat readiness of Reserve Component soldiers and units by synchronizing, coordinating, and executing training support and evaluations for the units within its area of responsibility. It would, on order, provide Mobilization Assistance Teams to selected installations and plan and provide military assistance to civilian authorities.

The 5th Brigade, 78th Division (Training Support) was first constituted on 5 August 1917 in the National Army as the 303rd Supply Train and assigned to the 78th Division. The unit was organized between December 1917 and May 1918 at Camp Dix, New Jersey. It consisted of 3 regiments: the 309th, 311th, and 312th. In France, during the summer and fall of 1918, the 78th Division, including the 303rd Supply Train, was the "point of the wedge" for the final offensive, which knocked out Germany. The 303rd Supply Train was credited with participation in 3 major campaigns during World War I: Meuse-Argonne, St. Mihiel and Lorraine. After the end of the Great War, the unit was demobilized on 5 June 1919 at Camp Dix, New Jersey.

The unit was reconstituted on 3 July 1926 in the Organized Reserves. It was concurrently consolidated with the 78th Division Quartermaster Train, which had been first organized in November 1921 in the Organized Reserves as the 78th Division Train, Quartermaster Corps, with Headquarters at Newark, New Jersey and then redesignated 23 March 1925 as the 78th Division Quartermaster Train. The consolidated unit was designated as the 78th Division Quartermaster Train. The unit was reorganized and redesignated on 1 July 1936 as the 403rd Quartermaster Regiment, an element of the 78th Division (later redesignated as the 78th Infantry Division).

The unit was reorganized and redesignated on 20 February 1942 as the 403d Quartermaster Battalion and ordered into active military service on 15 August 1942. When it was ordered into active service it was reorganized at Camp Butner, North Carolina. The unit was reorganized and redesignated (less Ordnance Maintenance Platoon, Headquarters Company) on 27 September 1942 as the 78th Quartermaster Company, an element of the 78th Infantry Division. The Ordnance Maintenance Platoon, Headquarters Company thereafter had a separate lineage. After 2 years as part of the 78th Infantry Division, the Company embarked for the European Theater of Operations. The Regiment was credited with participation in 3 campaigns in World War II: Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace, and Central Europe. After the end of the war, the Regiment was inactivated on 22 May 1946 in Germany.

The Company was reactivated on 21 February 1947 at Newark, New Jersey. During this period, the organized Reserves were redesignated on 25 March 1948 as the Organized Reserve Corps, which was in turn redesignated on 9 July 1952 as the Army Reserve. The 403rd Quartermaster Regiment remained a part of this organization through the redesignations. It was inactivated on 18 March 1954 at Newark, New Jersey and disbanded entirely on 1 May 1959.

The unit was reconstituted on 24 November 1967 in the Army Reserve as the 78th Committee Group, an element of the 78th Division (Training) and activated on 31 January 1968 at Camp Kilmer, New Jersey. It was reorganized and redesignated on 1 August 1971 as Headquarters, 78th Committee Group, an element of the 78th Division (Training) and again on 16 October 1978 as Headquarters, 78th Training Command, an element of the 78th Division (Training), before being inactivated on 17 October 1984 at Edison, New Jersey.

The unit was redesignated on 1 October 1993 as Headquarters, 5th Brigade, 78th Division (Exercise), and activated at Baltimore, Maryland. The unit was reorganized and redesignated on 17 October 1999 as Headquarters, 5th Brigade, 78th Division (Training Support) and allotted to the Regular Army at Fort Meade, Maryland. At that time, the 15th Support Brigade was inactivated and reflagged as the 5th Brigade, 78th Division (Training Support). This change was in accordance with a US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) published plan. The plan, titled "Training Support XXI" restructured active component support to reserve component units, reflecting the Army's increased reliance on reserve forces.

In March 2001 military Police and engineers took over Camp Dobol at Fort Dix, as nearly 400 soldiers honed their skills for deployment with the 29th Infantry Division to the Balkans. The 28th Infantry Division of the Pennsylvania Army National Guard deployed for Stabilization Force XII. Comprised mainly of 29th Infantry Division (Light) soldiers, the mobilization was the largest Reserve component call up since Desert Storm. It included soldiers from more than 20 states, half a dozen Regional Support Command and active duty units, plus tons of equipment and hundreds of vehicles.

Recent Stability and Support Operations (SASO) training provided by the 78th Division (Training Support)'s 5th Brigade, which included the 143rd Forward Support Battalion of the Connecticut Army National Guard, focused on training tasks that a logistics organization would face in Bosnia. For this 4-day training period, the lanes were changed to reflect mission tasks for the 229th Engineer Battalion from Fredericksburg, Virginia, and the United States Army Reserve's 372nd Military Police Company from Cumberland, Maryland. The latter belonged to the 336th Military Police Battalion, headquartered in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania.

Under the 78th Division, observers and controllers using lanes training crawl-walk-run methodology, soldiers were required to perform various tasks associated with the collective training of an entire operation in 4-6 lanes that were associated with their jobs. Each of the lanes contained tasks that were theater specific for all soldiers going to the region, such as how to conduct a convoy or manage an unexploded ordnance situation, to name a few of the training events. The lanes were designed to reflect actual conditions in Bosnia as much as possible.

All training began when soldiers took control of the base camp. The moment soldiers arrived, the training began with the stress associated with deploying to a foreign nation. Soldiers received their training mission at the base camp before convoying to respective lanes training areas. In the case of the engineers tasks, they had to be successful at convoying and observing the clearing of a minefield by international authorities. For the military policemen, force protection for a base camp, and providing secure convoy movements were critical for the military police training.




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