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FM 34-45: Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Electronic Attack

Appendix E

Example Formats and Target Report

The targeting products developed during the targeting process are actually tools. They are used by the commander, the targeting team, and supporting and supported units. The products allow them to control and synchronize targeting effectively and efficiently. As such, there are no prescribed formats. Each unit will develop tools that work best for that unit. Factors to consider in developing formats:

  • Type and level of the command.
  • Operating environment.
  • Assets available.
  • Missions.
  • SOPs.

GENERAL

 

E-1. Regardless of the formats used, the decide, detect, deliver, and assess methodology associated with the command decision cycle must be followed.

E-2. The purpose of this appendix is to provide a menu of formats. They may be copied and used as is, or the targeting team can modify them to suit the needs of the command. Also provided is a sample target report format which can be used or modified as desired.

E-3. These formats are not yet integrated into supporting C4I systems such as tactical fire (TACFIRE) direction system, Advanced Field Artillery Tactical Data System (AFATDS), Warrior, and ASAS. The need for automation support is apparent and emerging. C4I systems will be asked to incorporate similar targeting formats.

HIGH-PAYOFF TARGET LIST

E-4. The modified HPTL at Figure E-1 is the basic format described in Chapter 4.

EVENT OR PHASE: _______________________________________________________

PRIORITY

CATEGORY

TARGET

     
     
     
     
     

Figure E-1. High Payoff Target List

TARGET SELECTION STANDARDS

 

E-5. TSSs are comprised of the essential elements as shown in the sample entries in Figure E-2. HPT refers to the designated HPTs which the collection manager is tasked to acquire.

HPT

TIMELINESS

ACCURACY

COPs

3 hrs

150 m

RSTA

30 min

150 m

2S3

30 min

500 m

M-46

30 min

500 m

ADA

15 min

500 m

CPs

3 hrs

500 m

Ammunition

6 hrs

1 km

Maneuver

1 hr

150 m

Figure E-2. Example TSS

ATTACK GUIDANCE MATRIX

 

E-6. The AGM (Figure E-3) provides guidance on what HPTs should be attacked and when and how. The AGM consists of the following.

  • HPTL. A prioritized list of HPTs by phase of the operation.
  • WHEN. The time the target should be engaged.
  • HOW. The attack system that will engage the target.
  • EFFECT. The desired effects on the target or target system.
  • REMARKS. Remarks concerning whether or not BDA is required, whether coordination must take place, and so forth.

PHASE/EVENT: Attack through the security zone

HPTL

WHEN

HOW

EFFECT

REMARKS

COPs

P

GS arty

N

Plan in initial prep

RSTA and COPs

P

GS arty

N

Plan in initial prep

2S1 and 2S3

P

MLRS

N

Plan in initial prep

2S6, SA9, and SA13

P

GS arty

S

SEAD for aviation operations

Regiment CP

A

MLRS

N

 

Reserve Battalion

P

Avn Bde

D

Intent to attack reserve battalion in EA HOT

C2

P

TLQ-17

EW

Deny communications to C2

         
LEGEND: I = IMMEDIATE S = SUPPRESS
A = AS ACQUIRED N = NEUTRALIZE
P = PLANNED D = DESTROY
Prep = Include in preparation fires EW = JAMMING or other OFFENSIVE EW

Figure E-3. Example AGM

SENSOR OR ATTACK MATRIX

 

E-7. The sensor or attack matrix is a tool used to determine if organic sensors and attack systems can acquire and attack the HVTs for each critical event or phase of the battle (Figure E-4). Use additional sheets as necessary.

EVENT: ATTACK THROUGH SECURITY ZONE

HVT

COPsRSTA

M46

2S3

MAIN

FWD

CPs

AMMO

MANEUVER

HVT

SENSOR

           

ATK SYSTEM

EPW team

       

S

A

Mnvr brigade

CI team

   

S

 

S

 

AHB

LRSD

S/A

         

D/A 155-mm SP

TRQ-32

S

A

A

S

   

D/A MLRS

ALQ-151

 

A

A

S

   

C/A MLRS

PPS-5

     

A

   

EW: TLQ-17

OH-58D

S

   

A

     

TRQ-32

     

S/A

   

TLQ-17

Q36 CMR

   

S

   

A

CAS: 20/day

               
               
S = SENSOR with capability to acquire target A = ATTACK system with capability to engage target
D/A = Division/Artillery C/A = Corps/Artillery

Figure E-4. Example Sensor or Attack Matrix

OPTIONAL HIGH PAYOFF TARGET LIST and ATTACK GUIDANCE MATRIX

 

E-8. The examples shown in Figures E-5 and E-6 are simpler than those discussed in Chapter 3 and combine the formats. This allows the targeting team to specify HPTs in priority order with as much detail as desired. It also allows the team to immediately specify the when, how, and restrictions information for attack of the HPTs. The HPTL and AGM will likely change as the battle progresses from one phase or critical event to another. Therefore, a separate HPTL and AGM can be prepared for each phase of the battle.

EVENT OR PHASE: Attack through security zone.

HIGH-PAYOFF TARGET LIST

ATTACK GUIDANCE
WHEN, HOW, RESTRICTIONS

COPs

Prep, A, N, cannon and/or rocket.

RSTA

Prep, A, N, cannon and/or rocket.

2S3

Prep, I, N, cannon and/or rocket.

M46

Prep, I, N, cannon and/or rocket.

Use corps assets beyond PL Diamond.

ADA

SEAD, P, S

CPs

Prep, A, D

Ammunition

Prep, A, D

Maneuver and reconnaissance patrols

Prep, A, N

   
   
LEGEND: I = IMMEDIATE S = SUPPRESS
A = AS ACQUIRED N = NEUTRALIZE
P = PLANNED D = DESTROY

Prep: Include in preparation fires.

Figure E-5. Example of HPTL-AGM (Option 1)

PRIORITY

CATEGORY

HPTs

WHEN

HOW

COMMENTS

1

ADA

SA-8, SA-11, SA-15

A/P

N

 

2

FS

Arty CP MRL, C/B weapons

1

N/EW

Coord with ES

3

ENGINEER

Bridging units, pontoons

A

N

 

4

C3

MRR, MRD CP

A

N/EW

Coord with ES

5

MANEUVER

1st Ech/lead div

A

N

 

6

RSTA

Fwd intercept DF nodes

I

N

 

-

NUKE/CHEM

 

I

D

Need BDA

-

RECON

 

A

N

Not HPT

-

CLASS III POL

 

A

N

Not HPT

-

CLASS V AMMO

 

A

N

Not HPT

-

CLASS IX MAINT

 

A

N

Not HPT

-

LIFT

 

A

N

Not HPT

-

LOC

 

A

N

Not HPT

           
LEGEND: I = IMMEDIATE S = SUPPRESS
A = AS ACQUIRED N = NEUTRALIZE
P = PLANNED D = DESTROY

Figure E-6. Example of HPTL-AGM (Option 2)

TARGET SHEETS

 

E-9. The decision on which HVTs should or could be attacked requires knowledge of their individual vulnerabilities, locations, signatures, and functions. Also considered is the effect that an attack on them will have on the parent enemy unit. This information, when consolidated, is called a target sheet. Locally produced target sheets should contain the major sections discussed in paragraph E-10.

E-10. The construction of target sheets, as shown in Figure E-7, is simple and much of the information is readily available, although from varied sources.

  • Security Classification of target sheet information should appear at the top and bottom.
  • Target Category indicates to which of the 13 sets the target belongs.
  • Sheet No/Title should be assigned to the target so it may be referenced in the future. The sheet number can be used to cross-reference the target sheet with the spreadsheet. The title refers to the type and function.
  • Function details the specific operations and tasks that the target is expected to do. It includes the primary and secondary functions of the target and indicates any relationship to other target categories or types.
  • Description details the number and type of vehicles and equipment in a position and the approximate number of people with the target. The description is useful in considering the types of attack systems and munitions to be used.
    • Usual distance form the current forward edge of the battle area (FEBA).
    • Expected posture of the target with respect to camouflage and orientation.
    • Type and amount of terrain occupied.
  • Signature describes all possible signatures to include visual, electronic, auditory, and infrared. This portion is especially useful to target acquisition and intelligence collection managers.
  • Degradation describes the effects on the parent or associated intelligence unit when the target can no longer function. This is called the degradation portion.
  • Graphic Representation aids in identifying the target and in analyzing its vulnerabilities. It may be used to help determine the effects desired against the target.

ELECTRONIC WARFARE ANNEX

 

E-11. The EW annex (Figure E-8) is a tool used to determine the attack system (nonlethal) for targets. The EWO will place HPTs designated by the commander onto the annex for engagement. The engagements will be synchronized with the AGM and will be tied to the ISM for queuing for engagement.

____________

(Classification)

TARGET CATEGORY: Engineer.
TARGET SHEET NO/TITLE: GT 75/Ferry crossing site.
FUNCTION: Provide rapid crossing of water obstacles for tanks and other systems lacking amphibious capability.
DESCRIPTION: Target radius-point target.
Posture-exposed on water surface FEBA distance.
Composition: Vehicles, normally two ferries or rafts. (If the river is over 300 meters wide, there may be as many as five.)
Personnel:
SIGNATURE: Visual- (See graphic representation)
Electronic-
Other-
DEGRADATION: Forces lacking amphibious capability must find alternate means to cross.
GRAPHIC REPRESENTATION: (Omitted)

__________________

(Classification)

Figure E-7. Sample Target Sheet


Figure E-8. Sample EW Annex.



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