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Iran Press TV

Syria interested in ceasefire plan for Aleppo: UN envoy

Iran Press TV

Tue Nov 11, 2014 4:38PM GMT

The Syrian government is interested in the UN proposal for the suspension of fighting in the northern city of Aleppo, which can be used as a model for similar plans in other parts of the country, the UN mediator in Syria says.

Speaking to reporters before leaving the Syrian capital, Damascus, on Tuesday, Staffan de Mistura added that a successful local ceasefire in the key city of Aleppo could provide a model for progress in the war-torn country.

'My meetings here with the government and with President [Bashar] Assad gave me the feeling that they are studying very seriously and very actively the UN proposal,' de Mistura said, adding, 'The initial response by the government of Syria...was of interest and constructive interest.'

Syrian President Assad on Monday expressed his readiness to study the United Nations' initiative to "freeze" military operations in Aleppo, saying it is necessary to work on the new proposal in order to bring back security to the city.

On October 30, the UN envoy proposed an action plan for areas where Syrian forces are fighting Takfiri militants, and said the proposal includes "freeze zones" in Syria to allow delivery of humanitarian aid, starting with the country's largest city, Aleppo.

Aleppo has been one of the main areas hit by fierce fighting between the government forces and foreign-backed militants.

Syria has been gripped by deadly violence since 2011. Western powers and their regional allies -- especially Qatar, Saudi Arabia and Turkey -- are reportedly supporting the militants operating in Syria.

UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra'ad Zeid al-Hussein has said that more than 200,000 people have died in the Syrian conflict since March 2011.

SF/KA/SS



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