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Iran Press TV

IAEA inspectors satisfied with recent Iran visits: Official

Iran Press TV

Sat May 10, 2014 3:0PM GMT

Iran says inspectors of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) have expressed satisfaction with their recent visits of two nuclear sites in the country.

The Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) spokesman, Behrouz Kamalvandi, said the IAEA inspectors recently visited Saghand uranium mine in Yazd and Ardakan concentration plant in central Iran based on two agreements reached between the country and the UN nuclear body in November 2013 and on February 8, adding that the inspectors expressed satisfaction with the visit.

"Our first impression of the inspectors' presence, their visits and the data they collected is satisfactory; and it seems that based on the goals of the Islamic Republic of Iran this process is moving forward," he said.

The official added that the IAEA inspectors' visit shows that the Islamic Republic has been committed to the agreements it signed with the UN nuclear body.

He also stated that Iran and the IAEA reached certain agreements on Arak heavy water reactor during the visit.

Based on the agreements, the Islamic Republic of Iran was obliged to submit information to the IAEA and allow inspections of certain facilities, which it did, he said.

"The Islamic Republic of Iran has managed to clarify certain issues with the aim of removing ambiguities," Kamalvandi added.

He said experts from the AEOI and the IAEA will meet in the Austrian city of Vienna on Monday to discuss further cooperation.

Earlier this month, an IAEA delegation visited Saghand uranium mine and the Ardakan yellow-cake production site. Iran and the IAEA inspectors also talked about Arak heavy water reactor and agreed on how the Agency will carry out inspections of the plant in central Iran.

AR/HMV/SS



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