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LSD-193 Hsuhai-class [Anchorage] Landing Ship Tank

27th Amphibiou Squadron The ex-LSD 38 Pensacola, an Anchorage-class dock landing ship, was leased by the Republic of China Navy from the United States. The ship was commissioned into Taiwan's Navy in early July 2000, following completion of the combat readiness program for the amphibious vessel. Renamed "Hsuhai," the ship replaced the landing ship "Chung Cheng". The ship, which was first commissioned by the US Navy in 1971, arrived in a navy base in southern Taiwan in early June 2000. It is 171 meters long and 25 meters wide with a displacement tonnage of 8,600-13,700 tons. It has a maximum speed of 22 knots and is able to sail 14,800 nautical miles before refueling. A second Anchorage-class ship was not acquired by Taiwan.

In the late 1990s, the Taiwan Navy replaced an existing old Zhongzheng (LSD-191) and Zhenhai (LSD-192) dock landing ship (the latter decommissioned in 1999) to lease an Anchorage to the United States. The (Anchorage class) class docks landed on the USS Pensacola LSD-38. The ship was received by the Taiwan Navy as a "warm ship" immediately after the release from the US Navy on September 22, 1999. It returned to Taiwan on June 1 of the following year and became a military at the end of the month. It was named Xuhai (LSD-193. Originally, the Taiwan Navy also planned to rent one or two Anchorage class ships to replace the Zhongzheng, and the US Senate also handed over the USS Anchoroage LSD-36 to Taiwan in November 2003.

It is said that the United States also intends to sell the USS Portland LSD-37 Portland to Taiwan, but the Taiwan Navy has not continued to purchase the Portland, sank as a target for the US Navy live-fire exercise on April 25, 2004. Due to the failure to purchase the second Anchorage class, in order to maintain the preparation of the two dock landing ships, the old Zhongzheng had to continue to serve. Due to the worse and more difficult ship conditions, it was finally removed on July 1, 2012. Campaign (the ship completed a major repair more than half a year ago).

Compared with the Zhongzheng and Zhenhai, which were built during the Second World War, the Xuhai can operate the General Landing Craft (LCU), the Mechanical Landing Craft (LCM) and the Amphibious Landing Vehicle (LVT), as well as the US Marine Corps. The relying air cushion landing craft (LACA) (the Taiwan Navy does not currently have this equipment). After receiving the Xuhai number, the Taiwan Navy did not make major changes. It only installed two nationally-made T-75S 20mm cannons. The two MK-38 25mm cannons on the ship were not in conformity with the national army because of the ammunition specifications, so have been dismantled.

At the time of renting the ship, many legislators of the Taiwan Legislative Yuan believed that such a huge dock landing ship would be useless in the current defensive operations in Taiwan, and questioned its huge hull speed, flexibility and lack of firepower would become The best live target for Chinese anti-ship missiles. However, in fact, the Navy mainly uses the Xuhai as a dock transport ship, and can carry the small boat of the outer island speedboat unit between the island and the outer island for equipment transportation or return to the factory for maintenance, because the outer island does not have perfect ship maintenance facilities.

In addition, the Xuhai can also use its huge hull and stern dock to load other small boats or vehicles, and even use it as a transport ship to transport supplies. Therefore, even without considering traditional amphibious operations, the Xuhai is still quite useful to the Taiwan Navy. In addition, the speed of the Xuhai is about five knots higher than that of the Zhongzheng and Zhenhai. The ship has two MK-15 short range weapon systems, and its practicality and survivability are higher than that of the Zhongzheng.



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Page last modified: 23-10-2019 18:37:07 ZULU