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KDX-III Sejong Destroyer - Subcontractors

The Republic of Korea Ministry of Defense announced on Oct. 25, 2001, that Thales Naval Nederland was one of the two final candidates selected for the combat system of the KDX-III Destroyer program for the ROK Navy. The other candidate was Lockheed Martin. The selection was for the second phase of the procurement process, referred to as the Test & Evaluation and Negotiation phase. Other combat systems that were being considered by the ROKN were Sampson (British Aerospace) and APAR (Signaal).

Thales Naval Nederland has offered a different solution for the combat system, the APAR Combat System. The combat system proposed by Thales Naval Nederland for the KDX-III destroyer programme includes the APAR multifunction radar, the SMART-L volume search radar, the SIRIUS infrared search and track system (IRST), MIRADOR tracking and observation system, as well as the combat direction system with associated software and interfaces to other equipment, including the combat system integration responsibility with respect to GFE. The ROK Navy was clearly considering both solutions. Final selection by the ROK MND was anticipated in June 2002.

On 18 March 2002, the US Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) notified Congress of the possible sale of three Lockheed Martin Aegis air defence systems, worth a potential US$1.2 billion, to arm the Republic of Korea Navy's three new KDX-III destroyers. Aegis is very important for KDX-III. The ROKN is made a very strong effort to purchase the Aegis Combat System (baseline 7 phase 1) for KDX-III. The destroyer has been referred to as Aegis Destroyer, after Lockheed Martin's Aegis system. However, this was just one of the possible combat system solutions.

Lockheed Martin was selected by South Korea to supply the Aegis system for the next generation of Korean destroyers. Lockheed Martin was selected over the French company which supplied the country's existing destroyers. On 25 July 2002 Lockheed Martin won the contract to provide South Korea's navy with weapons control systems for three destroyers, beating European rival Thales SA. The Korean Navy selected the U.S Navy and Lockheed Martin to provide the Aegis Weapon System for its KDX-III Destroyer Program in late 2002. The three KDX-III Destroyers, equipped with the Aegis Weapon System, will allow the Korean Navy to successfully defend the maritime areas around the Korean Peninsula from air, surface and underwater threats. In addition, the KDX-III Destroyers will increase interoperability with the U.S. Navy.

On 06 June 2003 Lockheed Martin, Naval Electronics and Surveillance Systems, Moorestown, N.J., was awarded a $267,447,827 cost-plus-award-fee letter contract for Aegis weapon system engineering in support of the Republic of Korea foreign military sales program. The Republic of Korea competitively selected the U.S. Navy/Lockheed Martin Aegis combat system (ACS) for its KDX-III shipbuilding program. The requirements include the necessary combat systems engineering, computer program development, ship integration and test support to deliver a variant of the U.S. Navy Aegis weapon system Baseline 7 Phase I computer program and equipment to support the construction of the first Korean ship in the KDX-III class. In addition, this contract funds an integrated test team to assist the Korean shipyard in performing installation and testing of the ACS. Work will be performed in Moorestown, N.J. (62%); Falls Church, Va. (12%); Korea (10%); Norway (10%); and Washington, D.C. (1%), and is expected to be completed by December 2008. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The contract was not competitively procured. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity (N00024-03-C-5102).

On 29 June 2004 Lockheed Martin, Maritime Systems and Sensors (LM MS2), Moorestown, N.J., was awarded a $15,787,478 cost-plus-fixed-fee modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-03-C-5102) for procurement and delivery of material for the KDX-III Baseline K1 Naval Systems Computing Center, Combat Systems Engineering Development Site and Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace. Contractor will provide combat systems engineering, computer program development, and ship integration and test support to deliver a variant of the U.S. Navy Aegis Weapon System Baseline 7, Phase I Computer Program and equipment to support the construction of the first Korean Ship in the KDX-III class. In addition, this contract funds an Integrated Test Team to assist the Korean shipyard in performing installation and testing of the Aegis combat system. The contract supports the Country of Korea under the Foreign Military Sales Program. Work will be performed in Moorestown, N.J., and is expected to be completed by December 2006. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity.

June 26, 2006 the Defense Security Cooperation Agency notified Congress of a possible Foreign Military Sale to the South Korean Government of 48 SM-2 Block IIIB Tactical STANDARD missiles as well as associated equipment and services. The total value, if all options are exercised, could be as high as $111 million. The Government of Korea has requested a possible sale of 48 SM-2 Block IIIB Tactical STANDARD missiles with Mk 13 Mod 0 canisters, containers, Intermediate-Level Maintenance spares and repair parts, supply support, personnel training and training equipment, publications and technical data, U.S. Government and contractor technical assistance and other related elements of logistics support. The estimated cost is $111 million. Korea will use these missiles as the primary defensive system aboard its new KDX-III AEGIS destroyer for anti-missile ship protection. Korea has already integrated the SM-2 Block IIIA into its ship combat systems. It will have no difficulty absorbing these additional missiles into its armed forces.

In November 2004 Rolls-Royce was awarded an order worth more than $40 million to supply nine AG9140RF gas turbines for South Korea's KDX III destroyer program. The Koreans chose the Rolls-Royce system because it is the same used for Arleigh Burke-class (DDG-51) destroyers in U.S. Navy service. The turbines will provide the main electrical power system for the three ships in the KDX III program. Korean firm Samsung Techwin placed the contract order.

In July 2006 Rolls-Royce, the world-leading provider of power systems and services, has delivered the first three gas turbine generator sets which will provide the main electrical power system for the Republic of Korea Navy's first 7,000-ton KDX-III destroyer. The first AG9140RF gas turbine generator set, was produced at the Rolls-Royce Indianapolis plant, and the other two were assembled by Samsung Techwin from Rolls-Royce supplied kits. Another six generator sets, being assembled by Samsung Techwin from Rolls-Royce supplied kits, will be supplied to the other two KDX-III destroyers that are scheduled to be built. The alternator for the generator set is planned to be produced by Hyundai under licence.

In 2007 the ROK Navy Aegis class Destroyer, KDX-III, took delivery of the most advanced DAVIS Infrared Signature Suppression (IRSS) technology. Using an automatic controller which monitors the surrounding environment, the advanced system actively controls IR signature in order to blend the ship in with the background. DAVIS augmented the Eductor/Diffuser, which passively mixes cool ambient air into the engine exhaust stream, with an active sea water injection (SWI) system. The SWI system injects a fine water mist into the exhaust stream in order to further cool the exhaust gas by water evaporation. Ship skin signature is controlled by an active hull cooling (AHC) system which automatically controls the flow of water to a large array of sprinklers. The controller for the advanced IR suppression systems is the Onboard Signature Manager (OSM) which calculates the optimal temperatures for the ship hull and superstructure given present environmental conditions. OSM builds on the NATO standard IR signature prediction code, ShipIR/NTCS. The IR suppression systems for the KDXIII were selected by the ROK Navy after a thorough cost-benefit analysis which was conducted using ShipIR/NTCS throughout the basic and detailed design stages of the ship.




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