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Military


Echelons and Ranks

Forces Armées RoyalesThe ranks and insignia of all branches of the FAR reflected the long influence of the French military as well as that of the United States. The rank structures of the army and the air force were patterned on those of France and the United States, except that there were fewer enlisted ranks. The navy rank structure's similarity to that of the French navy was largely attributable to the fact that until 1965 this branch of the FAR was commanded by a capitaine de fregate (equivalent to a United States Navy commander) on loan from the French fleet. The rank structures of all services were modified in the mid-1970s when the FAR adopted a new officer grade — colonel-major — that has been unique to Morocco.

During the first 15 years after the end of the protectorate, the FAR — far from being a threat to the monarchy — was considered to be a pillar of the king's strength. Most observers saw the upper levels of the officer corps as basically apolitical, fiercely loyal to the monarchy and, in contrast to other elements of the elite, generally uncorrupt. The apolitical nature of the FAR was strongly encouraged by the monarchy.

A zahir (royal decree) issued in 1958 forbade the affiliation of the military or any individuals in it with any political movement. This move was taken without consulting the Istiqlal and effectively blunted the politicians' attempts to politicize the officer corps. Military loyalty to the throne was also reinforced by the knowledge that the king was responsible for the power, prestige, and position that his military leaders were able to attain. Because virtually all of them had previously served with the foreign military forces occupying Morocco, the military leaders had no political base independent of the king. Moreover, they distrusted the civilian political leaders and resented their factionalism.

For their part, according to political scientist John Waterbury, the civilian political leaders feared the military, which "enables the king to curb civilian elements of the elite and to present himself as the most feasible alternative to military rule." By thus playing on the anxieties of both the politicians and the military leadership, the monarchy was able to undermine the civilian opposition and accumulate a virtual monopoly of power during the 1950s and 1960s.

In the late 1960s, when the parliament (the Chamber of Representatives) was dismissed and the country was run by royal fiat during the "state of exception," the king increasingly placed military officers in important administrative and advisory roles. General Oufkir, who had been appointed minister of interior in 1964, emerged as the king's closest security adviser. By 1970 most of the provincial governors were soldiers, and military officers served in mid- and upper-level administrative positions in government departments and as quids.

After the military coups of 1971 and 1972 Hassan had frozen promotions to general officer grade. The new rank of colonel- major was conferred on Dlimi in 1976 when the king chose to promote him in recognition for his influence and responsibility but did not wish to give him status as a general office at that time. Later, in 1980, Dlimi become the first officer promoted to brigadier general (general de brigade) in nearly a decade. After Dlimi's demise, Ben Aissa, who had been a brigadier general before 1971, was the only general officer in the Moroccan military establishment. In early 1985 this situation changed when Hassan announced that Ben Aissa would be promoted to major general (general de division) and that six colonel-majors—including Benanni, Kabbaj, Royal Military Academy commandant Loubaris, the director of the Royal Gendarmerie, the director of the Royal Aides de Camp, and the general secretary of the National Defense Administration—would be promoted to brigadier general.

The brigade is the military unit commanded by a Colonel Major or a Brigadier General. The brigade is the largest organic unit of the Royal Armed Forces, about 3,000 to 5,000 strong. However, their number may be even smaller if the profession is specialized. A Brigade General, if assigned to a "field" mission, usually commands a brigade, a unit composed of regiments. With regiments averaging about two miles to three thousand men, a brigade usually has no more than 5,000 men. Colonel Major is the highest rank of senior officer. This rank indicates the ability to exercise an important command, in this case a brigade, although in some cases may command a regiment.

Regiment / Group - Armored Group, Artillery or Combat Engineer Group and an Infantry Command Battalion is the military unit that includes one or more battalions or companies, and is commanded by a colonel or lieutenant-colonel. Its average strength varies between 2,000 and 3,000 men. The regiments belonging to the armored weapon or to the combat engineers are composed of squadrons and the regiments of artillery are, as for them, composed of batteries. However, the lieutenant-colonel also holds various command positions within the Moroccan General Staff. Group. Some battalions are commanded, especially in the case of corps units, by senior regimental officers in person (colonel, lieutenant colonel), others are commanded by the most senior of their commanders. The Section is commanded by a sergeant with a Master Corporal or Corporal as Deputy Commander.

The rank of Colonel is the third and highest rank of senior officers, above the rank of Colonel Major and below the rank of Brigadier General. He usually commands a regiment, averaging about two miles to three thousand men. The rank of Lieutenant-Colonel is the second rank of senior officers, above the rank of Commander and below that of Colonel. In the Land Force, the typical position of a Lieutenant-Colonel is that of Commander of a Regiment or Armored Group, Artillery or Combat Engineer, and an Infantry Command Battalion. However, the lieutenant-colonel also holds various command positions within the Moroccan General Staff.

A battalion is the military unit of several companies, from 500 to 1000 men. Several battalions make up a Regiment or a Group. Some battalions are commanded, especially in the case of corps units, by senior regimental officers in person (colonel, lieutenant colonel), others are commanded by the most senior of their commanders. - Colonel - Lieutenant-Colonel - Commander The Commander is the first rank of senior officers, and is the officer commanding a battalion, which usually has between 500 and 1,000 men. The Commander stands hierarchically above the captain and below the lieutenant-colonel. Chief Warrant Officer rank of Adjutant is the highest of the NCO ranks. The soldiers who carry this rank represent a lot of prestige for the soldiers and also serve as mentors for the Sub-Lieutenants and Lieutenants. In fact, the Chief Warrant Officer is often part of the staff of a regiment or battalion, just like the senior officers as the rank and file representative of the rank and file.

Company / Squadron is composed of between 50 and 200 men. It has at least three platoons and a command and support post. The company is commanded by a Captain. The company is a unit comparable to the squadron. The infantry battalions are composed of companies while the regiments belonging to the armored or combat engineers are composed of squadrons. The artillery regiments are composed of batteries. The Captain is the highest military rank of junior officers. He is superior to the rank of Lieutenant and below the rank of Commander. The captain occupies a wide variety of different positions in the three levels: tactical, operational and strategic. Indeed, a captain can command a company of up to 200 men or a section at the tactical level; he may be employed as an operations officer in a battalion or Regimental Operations Room; he may hold a position in a training headquarters at the operational or strategic level. This position depends mainly on the level of experience of the captain, as it can vary a lot from one captain to another.

The Sergeant-Chief is one of the junior non-commissioned officers. He is below the Sergeant-Major and above the sergeant. He may serve as a substitute for the platoon commander (in principle a Captain) and command, in this case, a Company or take the head of a Platoon. The Sergeant Major is a position of the senior non-commissioned member of the unit or sub-unit. The general roles of the Sergeant Major are to assist the Commanding Officer or Commanding Officer, to deal with the discipline and to ensure the well-being of the non-commissioned members and to represent them to the Company Commander or the Commanding Officer. Officer Commander.

Consisting of several sections, the platoon is itself the subdivision of the company, which has at least three platoons. Each platoon is commanded by a lieutenant with an adjutant for deputy commander. In fact, the role of platoon warrant officer is often filled by a sergeant. The Sergeant-chef can also order in some cases a platoon. The rank of lieutenant is the second of the ranks of junior officers. He is superior to the rank of Sub-Lieutenant and below the rank of Captain. The lieutenant normally commands a platoon or troop. In general, he is considered the equal of captains with the only difference that he has less experience.

The adjutant is a senior non-commissioned officer rank between the Sergeant and the Chief Warrant Officer. The adjutant normally acts as the deputy commander of a platoon or section where he assists the commanding officer who is usually an officer of the rank of lieutenant. Sergeant is the first in the hierarchy of junior NCOs. The sergeant is usually a platoon commander or platoon lieutenant. He is also often employed as an instructor. The rank of second lieutenant is the second rank of officer. Second Lieutenant is a grade given to officer-students leaving the military schools. He can command his own section but generally he is the Platoon Leader's replacement to assist the Senior Officers.

A Section / Combat Group section is the military unit consisting of nine to twelve soldiers and is a sub-division of a platoon equivalent to a combat group. The Section is commanded by a sergeant with a Master Corporal or Corporal as Deputy Commander. - Sergeant - Master Corporal is the first in the hierarchy of men. He is below the Sergeant and above the Corporal. His rol is deputy commander of a section, a group of up to 12 soldiers in a platoon, a troop or a squadron. The Master Corporal also acts as an instructor. In fact, a master corporal is not a rank, but a position. The only difference is that if a master corporal changes his profession in the Armed Forces, he returns to the rank of Corporal. - Corporal The corporal is the third rank of rank members after that of Private Class. He is followed by the rank of Master Corporal. A corporal may have limited authority, and soldiers of the rank of soldier are required to obey him.up to 12 soldiers in a platoon, troop or squadron. The Master Corporal also acts as an instructor. In fact, a master corporal is not a rank, but a position. The only difference is that if a master corporal changes his profession in the Armed Forces, he returns to the rank of Corporal.




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Page last modified: 07-08-2018 23:35:09 ZULU