The Largest Security-Cleared Career Network for Defense and Intelligence Jobs - JOIN NOW

Military


Rudra 1 New Generation Anti-Radiation Missile NGARM

DRDO is involved in the design and development of NGARM having a range of 100 km. AKU-58 launcher after suitable modification will be used for missile integration on Su-30 MKI aircraft. Successful static firing of integrated P-I & P-II rocket motor was conditioned at high & low temperatures in Jun & Jul 2018 respectively. Captive Flight Trials were also successfully conducted in September 2018. This missile is said to have a range of over 110 kms. The Indian Air Force has test-fired Rudram-1 the first iteration of the NGARM missile. If this missile is inducted into the IAF, this will make India the 4th country after US, Russia & Germany to have a missile that can disable enemy radars stations and transmitters in an area.

On 09 October 2020 India successfully test-fired a Rudram 1 tactical anti-radiation missile. It was tested at the interim test range Balasore, off the coast of Odisha in the Bay of Bengal. This is a huge step forward, a senior government official said about the DRDOs successful test firing. The IAF will now have the capability to perform SEAD (Suppression of Enemy Air Defence) operations deep into enemy territory to destroy enemy air defence setup, the official said. This test demonstrates the capability of an Anti-Radiation Missile with large stand-off ranges, a second official said.

NGARM's broadband seeker is able to pick up radiation or signals emitted by radars and communication systems, home onto the target and destroy the network. "The New Generation Anti-Radiation Missile (Rudram-1) which is India's first indigenous anti-radiation missile developed by DRDO for Indian Air Force was tested successfully today at ITR, Balasore. Congratulations to DRDO and other stakeholders for this remarkable achievement," Defence Minister Rajnath Singh said.

RudramRudram is a set of hymns dedcated to Rudra, who presented Vedas to Brahma at the Commencement of kalpa. Rudram is the most sacred means of worshipping Lord Siva. Rudra Literally means that Fire comes from the Bowels of the earth spreading Gods Grace all over the world. Sri Rudram chant is an ancient Vedic hymn in praise of Lord Shiva, and is the oldest prayer with a listing of various names of Lord Shiva. Through the chanting of Sri Rudram, Lord Shivas various attributes and aspects are invoked and worshipped. Chanting the Rudram is considered to be of great benefit. The Rudram chanting can be done with or without the accompaniment of a Vedic yajna ritual. When accompanied with the Vedic fire ritual, it is called the Rudra Yajna.

Rudra Maha Yajnam is a very important form of worship of Lord Shiva, the very source of cosmic energy for the entire creation. His Divine form encompasses and extends far beyond all known and unknown galaxies and universes. Lord Shiva is omnipotent, omniscient and omnipresent. He is the conqueror of Death and an embodiment of infinite mercy, compassion and love. Chanting Rudram is as an expression of bhakti a (performed with devotees who partake prasadam or grace of the Lord).

The Rudram anti-raditioan missile is not to be confused with the RudraM-III Submarine Launch Cruise Missile (SLCM) or the 30mm AGS-17 HE Grenade Rudra.

In June 2016 Defense Research Development Organization (DRDO) scientists began ground testing of indigenous New Generation Anti-Radiation Missile in April and developed two prototypes by June. DRDO began testing prototypes of NGARM for captive flight trials on Su-30 MKI aircraft to validate its seeker, structural integrity, navigation and control system, and aerodynamic capability.

India tested the new indigenous air-launched missile from a Sukhoi-30MKI on 18 January 2019 at the integrated test range at Balasore. The missile, with all systems functioning properly, hit the designated target with a high degree of accuracy in the Bay of Bengal. The NGARM can be launched from Sukhois from different altitudes and velocities.

DRDO for the first time is using a dual-pulse propulsion system instead of thrust propulsion. NGARM is a single-stage, solid-fueled system and was initially expected to be ready for induction by 2019. It would be produced jointly by state-owned Bharat Dynamics and Bharat Electronics. NGARM will carry sensors and an RF seeker in its head, and a fixed antenna on its nose to detect radar by tracking its electro-magnetic radiation.

DRDO is developing NGARM for the Air Force Mirage-2000H, Jaguar, Su-30 MKI and the upcoming Light Combat Aircraft. The Indian Air Force (IAF) raised objections to the NGARM, saying the 60-kilometer-range NGARM is too bulky. NGARM being developed by DRDO weighs around 140 kilograms and is too heavy, whereas IAF wants only such missiles that do not weigh over 100 kilograms.

"DRDO has never kept us in the loop about this missile, and we are not sure if we will at all use it," an IAF official said, adding, "Infrared radiation seeker technology from Russia will make it too bulky."

DRDO said the missile should meet all Air Force fighter requirements. DRDO has claimed that NGARM is largely an indigenous missile. But one source said the agency could not develop the missile on its own and that DRDO has sought help from Russia for seeker technology.

The single-stage missile is of 140 kg weight and is powered by a dual-pulsed solid rocket motor. It uses a pre-fragmented warhead with an optical proximity fuze and is expected to create a surveillance gap in the enemy territory. It is the first indigenous air-to-ground missile developed by the DRDO, after the supersonic BrahMos, which has been developed jointly with Russia. This first-of-its-kind missile can also be integrated with Mirage 2000, Jaguar, HAL Tejas and HAL Tejas Mark 2 in the future.

The Indian Air Force can launch the Rudram 1 missile from the Sukhoi-30MKI fighter jets to negate enemy radars and surveillance systems. The missile has a launch speech of up to 2 Mach, twice the speed of sound. The Defence Research and Development Organisation developed the new generation weapon. This would allow IAF strike aircraft to carry out their mission unhindered effectively. The New Generation Anti-Radiation Missile, or NGARM, is integrated on Su-30MKI fighter aircraft. Its range depends on the height at which the fighter jet is flying. It can be launched from a height ranging from 500 meters to 15 km and can hit radiation emitting targets within a range of 250 km [other sources report it has a strike range of around 100 to 150 km].

DRDO staterd "It has INS-GPS navigation with Passive Homing Head for the final attack. The RUDRAM hit the radiation target with pinpoint accuracy. The Passive Homing Head can detect, classify and engage targets over a wide band of frequencies as programmed," it said. The statement added that the missile is a potent weapon for the Indian Air Force for suppression of enemy air defence effectively from large standoff ranges. "With this, the country has established indigenous capability to develop long-range air-launched anti-radiation missiles for neutralising enemy radars, communication sites and other RF emitting targets," the statement said.

The tactical, air-to-surface anti-radiation missile is equipped with a passive homing head that tracks sources of radiation of a wide range of frequencies. It can lock into a target not only before launch but also after it has been launched. The missile is comparable to the tactical air-to-surface missile AGM-88E Advanced Anti-Radiation Guided Missile that was inducted by the US Navy only in 2017 and can engage relocatable Integrated Air Defence targets and other targets equipped with shutdown capability. This means that if the enemy shuts down the radar after the missile is launched, it will still hit the target.

Rudram 1 New Generation Anti-Radiation Missile NGARM Rudram 1 New Generation Anti-Radiation Missile NGARM Rudram 1 New Generation Anti-Radiation Missile NGARM Rudram 1 New Generation Anti-Radiation Missile NGARM

An anti-radiation missile a warhead bearing, rocket propelled missile which is initially launched ballistically from a piloted aircraft, or other suitable means, into a field of radiation, with missile guidance and directional control being subsequently imposed for the terminal portion of the missile's trajectory in order that the missile may "home" on the radiation source to a miss distance compatible with a given kill radius of the missile's warhead.

An anti-radiation missile (ARM) is adapted to home on radio frequency (R.F.) signals radiated so that an explosive charge carried by such a missile may destroy a radar. To accomplish such homing, the guidance system in an ARM missile may be designed to lock onto the leading or trailing edge of radar interrogating pulses, as well as midpulse samples of such pulses. It is therefore desirable that, in order to increase the chance of survivability of a radar attacked by an ARM missile, decoys located in the vicinity of the radar be actuated to generate R.F. signals to cause the guidance system in an attacking ARM missile to home on an apparent source spaced from the radar.

The operation and use of radar systems which utilize electromagnetic wave emissions to determine the range, angle, or velocity of objects is well established. Radar systems will typically include a transmitter, one or multiple antennas, a receiver and processor. The transmitter works with the antennas to produce electromagnetic waves. The receiver works with the antennas to receive electromagnetic waves which have been reflected off object(s). The processor works with the output of the receiver to determine properties such as location and speed of the object(s) from which the electromagnetic waves were deflected. In many embodiments, radar systems employ electromagnetic waves in the radio or microwave domain (referred to generally herein as "radar waves" or "wave signals").

To accomplish such homing, the guidance system in an ARM missile may be designed to lock onto the leading or trailing edge of radar interrogating pulses, as well as midpulse samples of such pulses. It is therefore desirable that, in order to increase the chance of survivability of a radar attacked by an ARM missile, decoys located in the vicinity of the radar be actuated to generate RF signals to cause the guidance system in an attacking ARM missile to home on an apparent source spaced from the radar. Thus, RF signals from the decoys are synchronized with the interrogating signals from the radar so that the RF signals from the decoys produce pulses overlapping (in power and time) the interrogating pulses produced by sidelobes of the antenna in the radar.

Consequently, the guidance system in an attacking ARM missile is inhibited from using the leading or trailing edges or midpulse samples of the radar's interrogating pulses to accurately derive guidance commands. Further, the decoys are caused to "blink". That is to say, the position in time, relative to the defended radar of each of the decoys is periodically altered. As a result of such "blinking" the aim point of the ARM is caused to wander, thereby preventing the ARM from homing on the radar or any one of the decoys.

The mechanically driven radar antennas of the current missiles have a narrow look angle and slew too slowly to track widely separated targets, search radars and jamming sources. Phased array seekers have been developed which are electronically agile. By controlling the relative phase of RF energy between multiple apertures in the array, the resulting beam can be rapidly slewed over a wide area, for instance, a 120 degree cone about the center line of the array. Unfortunately, conventional phased array seeker systems are too large for a cost efficient missile.

In many implementations, radar systems employ an antenna that rotates three hundred sixty degrees (360.degree.) and generates a continuous stream of active wave signals. In such implementations, active wave signal generation is often controlled by a hardware or software switch. In cases wherein it has been desired to selectively shut off active wave signal generation, it typically has been done manually.

As such, a problem which still exists is that in a typical implementation of radar system with a continually rotating antenna, it may be impossible to automatically control the active wave signal generation based on the antenna's real time bearing so as to control the active illumination of the radar wave. It is well known that standard radar sweeps enable listening stations to detect and calculate the exact location of a platform emitting radar waves, which is an undesirable effect when attempting to operate covertly. For example, surface-to-air missile operators have historically learned to turn off their radar when an anti-radiation missile was being fired at them, and turn it back on later. These operators have shut off the radar by hand, and thus reduced the amount of data the other party could acquire. These operators, however could not continue their mission while they were trying to remain stealthy.

R.F. signals from the decoys are synchronized with the interrogating signals from the radar so that the R.F. signals from the decoys produce pulses overlapping (in power and time) the interrogating pulses produced by sidelobes of the antenna in the radar. Consequently, the guidance system in an attacking ARM missile is precluded from using the leading or trailing edges or midpulse samples of the interrogating pulses to derive guidance commands. Further, the decoys are caused to "blink". That is to say, only one of the decoys is allowed to be operative to overlap a given interrogating pulse. As a result of such "blinking" the aim point of the ARM is caused to wander, thereby preventing the ARM from homing on the radar or any one of the decoys.

To target a threat emitter, it is desirable for military platforms to determine the location of a threat emitter within a volume smaller than a cube thirty meters (about 100 ft) on a side. This can only be accomplished if the military platform can measure the emitter's angle of arrival to less than 0.1 degrees and the military platform's attitude with respect to earth coordinates is known to less than 0.1 degrees in roll, pitch and yaw.



NEWSLETTER
Join the GlobalSecurity.org mailing list


One Billion Americans: The Case for Thinking Bigger - by Matthew Yglesias


 
Page last modified: 23-10-2020 12:55:48 ZULU