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BAE 90-Meter Offshore Patrol Vessel (OPV)

The 90 meter Offshore Patrol Vessel is designed to perform Economic Exclusion Zone management roles, providing maritime security to coastal areas and effective disaster relief. Based on the River Class used by the UK Royal Navy, it is a versatile and capable ship. It has a radar system, carries a fast interceptor craft and rigid inflatable boat, and has provision to land a helicopter with accommodation for up to 50 additional passengers or embarked troops. It has a top speed of 25 knots, a 5,500 miles range and 35 days' endurance.

BAE Systems has a technology transfer agreement with Bangkok Dock, providing the design for a 90 meter Offshore Patrol Vessel for the Royal Thai Navy. Construction of the vessel was undertakenin Thailand, with engineers from BAE working alongside Bangkok Dock to transfer design knowledge, technology and skills. By August 2010 construction of the first BAE Systems designed Offshore Patrol Vessel for the Royal Thai Navy was underway in Thailand, as demonstrated at a formal keel laying ceremony at Bangkok Dock, the Company's local partner. The occasion, attended by Thailand's Royal representative, HRH Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn and senior officials from the Royal Thai Navy, came just 14 months after the initial contract was signed.

Under the agreement, BAE Systems supplied the design of its proven 90 meter Offshore Patrol Vessel, which Bangkok Dock adapted to meet the specific requirements of the Royal Thai Navy, for example incorporating a similar combat system to that being fitted to other ships in its fleet. Engineers from BAE Systems are working alongside Bangkok Dock, throughout the construction of the vessel to transfer design knowledge, technology and skills that will contribute to the growth of a sustainable shipbuilding capability in Thailand.

Commenting on the program, Alan Johnston, Managing Director of BAE Systems' Surface Ships division, said: "At a time when we are seeking to boost exports, this approach to industry partnerships shows the strength that BAE Systems can bring to navies around the world as they look for cost-effective solutions to enhance the capability of their fleets to meet future requirements." Captain Chumpol Promprasit, managing director of Bangkok Dock, said: "To promote a domestic shipbuilding industry, the Royal Thai Navy assigned Bangkok Dock to undertake the provision of design and supply of ship build material using both domestic and international experts during construction of the Offshore Patrol Vessel. "This is considered as promoting and improving the technical competency and potential of the Royal Thai Navy personnel in building ships for domestic purposes, based on the King's self sustainability programme."

The multi-mission Offshore Patrol Vessel will be used by the Royal Thai Navy to primarily be used for Economic Exclusion Zone roles, including routine patrols and border controls. It will also undertake fishery protection tasks as well as protection of natural resources in the Gulf of Thailand and the Andaman Sea and disaster relief.

The BAE Systems designed 90 meter Offshore Patrol Vessel built by Bangkok Dock for the Royal Thai Navy was the same core platform design as the ships that BAE Systems built in the UK for the Trinidad & Tobago Coast Guard. The platform is based on the design for the smaller River Class vessels used by the UK Royal Navy and is a highly capable vessel that is attractive to the export market.

BAE Systems built three Offshore Patrol Vessels for the Trinidad & Tobago Coast Guard and had a five year in-service support package for the vessels. The three Offshore Patrol Vessels for the Government of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago perform a range of Economic Exclusion Zone (EEZ) management, special operations and maritime law enforcement tasks. The first of the ships was constructed at BAE Systems' Portsmouth facility, while the second and third vessels were built at its yard at Scotstoun on the Clyde.

Two Offshore Patrol Vessels being built by BAE Systems for the Government of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago took a step closer to completion 18 November 2009. Employees at the Portsmouth Naval base joined in the celebrations today when the first vessel is formally named Port of Spain, while the second ship was set to launch and be named Scarborough, on the Clyde. The two 90m Offshore Patrol Vessels for the Trinidad and Tobago Coast Guard were part of a 150 million contract to build, integrate, test and commission (up to sea trials) three ships for the Government of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. Under the program the defence company would also provide training and a five year in-service support package, while the UK Ministry of Defence provided advice to the Government of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago and operational sea training to the Trinidad and Tobago Coast Guard crews.

BAE acquired VT Groups shipbuilding in 2009, and the first 2 ships would have been delivered in October 2010, but the customer canceled the contract. They were docked at BAE facilities, awaiting a buyer as BAE pursued negotiated and legal options with Trinidad & Tobago, and explored international re-sale. That eventually materialized at the end of 2011, with a sale of all 3 ships to Brazil, plus license-build options for up to 5 more ships, in a manner similar to the Thai deal. Trinidad & Tobagos own territorial waters didnt require all of these capabilities.

Length90 metre
Displacement 1,800 tonnes
Length 90 metres / 293 feet
Maximum beam 13.5 metres
Top speed 25 knots
Range 5,500 miles
Crew size 70
Embarked troops/passengers 50
Endurance 35 days
Length80 metre
Displacement 1,700 tonnes
Length 81.5 metres
Maximum beam 13.5 metres
Top speed 20 knots
Range 5,500 miles
Crew size 36
Accommodation provided for 70, but designed to be operable
with a crew of just 36
Embarked troops/passengers 20
Endurance 21 days






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