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Turkmenistan - Army Order of Battle

There is some considerable confusion as to the order of battle of Turkmenistan's Army. There are several readily available sources for such confusion. Turkministan remains highly secretive, and its military has had very limited contact with Western counterparts. In contrast to some African [eg CAR] or East Asian [eg Myanmar] countries, which are pathologically over-officered, in the 1990s Turkministan's Army was badly under-officered. The end strength of the Army more than doubled between 1996 [when it had 11,000 personnel] and 2007 [when it may have had as many as 26,000 personnel]. This growth may have largely resulted from the availabilty of additional Turkmen national officers to command units, recently trained to replace departed Russian officers.

But by any stretch of the imagination, there is a complete mismatch between Turkmenistan's notional order of battle and the actual end strength of troops on hand. Most sources report an order of battle of three motorized rifle divisions, a training division, and a division worth of separate combat units - roughly five divisions in all. In most armies around the world a unit designated as a "division" would typically have more than 10,000 and easily 15,000 troops. And in the US Army, there is about one "tail" soldier for every "tooth" soldier. A 1996 end-strength of 11,000 personnel would make for a bit more than 1,000 soldiers per division equivalent, while a 2007 end strength of 26,000 provides about 2,500 soldiers per "division" equivalent.

The army, which had been reduced to about 11,000 personnel by 1996, was reported by the US Library of Congress to be organized into one corps headquarters, three motorized rifle divisions, one artillery brigade, one multiple rocket launcher regiment, one antitank regiment, one engineer brigade, and one independent helicopter squadron. There are also signal, reconnaissance, and logistics support units. Three motorized rifle divisions were based at Ashgabat, Gushgy, and Gyzylarbat. The army's inventory included about 530 T-72 main battle tanks, 338 armored infantry fighting vehicles, 543 armored personnel carriers, 345 pieces of towed artillery, sixteen self-propelled guns, 114 multiple rocket launchers, sixty-three mortars, fifty-four antitank guns, and fifty air defense guns.

In 2006 the army was reported by the US Library of Congress to have about 21,000 active personnel. In 2006 Turkmenistan’s army, posted in five military districts, had three active motorized rifle divisions [one of which may have been a training division], one artillery brigade, one multiple rocket launcher regiment, one antitank regiment, one engineer regiment, two surface-to-air missile brigades, and one independent air assault battalion. The armed forces depend on a high percentage of increasingly outmoded, Soviet-era equipment, however; in the 1990s, Russia provided re-supply of some military matériel. In 2006 much of Turkmenistan’s military equipment was Soviet-era matériel that was in storage. The army had 702 main battle tanks, 170 reconnaissance vehicles, 942 armored infantry fighting vehicles, 829 armored personnel carriers, 269 pieces of towed artillery, 40 pieces of self-propelled artillery, 97 mortars, 65 multiple rocket launchers, 100 antitank guided weapons, 72 antitank guns, and 70 antiaircraft guns.

An evidently knowledgable source reports that as of 2007 the Army had 26,000 people, organized into four Motorized Infantry Divisions - the 2nd Training Motor Rifle, and the 3rd, 11th, and 22nd Motorized Infantry Division [each with three Motorized Rifle Regiments, a Tank Regiment, and Artillery Regiment, and an Air Defence Artillery Regiment). Other separate units included the 4th, 5th and 6th Motorized Infantry Brigades, an Artillery Brigade, an MRL Brigade, an Air Defence Brigade, and an Air Assault Brigade.

But as of 2009 Orbat.com reports that the army had about 25,000 active personnel, and that the division's had been eliminated, with maneuver forces concentrated in five Motorized Brigades and two Motorized Rifle Brigades.

UnitHQHonorific
Corps Headquarters
U/I Pioneer Regiment
U/I SCUD Brigade
U/I Anti-Aircraft Regiment
U/I Anti-Aircraft Regiment
U/I Artillery Brigade
U/I MRL Regiment
U/I Anti-Tank Regiment
U/I Air-Land Battalion
4 Motorized Rifle BrigadeTogrul beg
5 Motorized Rifle BrigadeÇagri Bega
6 Motorized Rifle BrigadeGerogly Bega
2 Training DivisionTedzhenAlp Arslan
U/I Training Regiment
U/I Training Regiment
U/I Training Regiment
3 Motorized Rifle DivisonAshgabatBairam Khan
U/I ADA Regiment
U/I Artillery Regiment
U/I Tank Regiment
U/I Motorized Rifle Regiment [BMP]
U/I Motorized Rifle Regiment [BTR]
U/I Motorized Rifle Regiment [BTR]
11 Motorized Rifle DivisonKushka (Serhetabat) Soltan Sanjar
U/I ADA Regiment
U/I Artillery Regiment
U/I Tank Regiment
U/I Motorized Rifle Regiment [BMP]
U/I Motorized Rifle Regiment [BTR]
U/I Motorized Rifle Regiment [BTR]
22 Motorized Rifle DivisonKyzyl-Arvat (Serdar)Atamurat Niyazov
U/I ADA Regiment
U/I Artillery Regiment
U/I Tank Regiment
U/I Motorized Rifle Regiment [BMP]
U/I Motorized Rifle Regiment [BTR]
U/I Motorized Rifle Regiment [BTR]



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Page last modified: 13-03-2013 16:09:24 ZULU