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DD-X Program - 2006

In 2005 Congress fully supported the DD(X) budget request and the DD(X), now named the Zumwalt class, was ready to start construction. The FY06 Budget request included $1.1B in RDT&E for continued technology development and $716M in SCN advance procurement funds for the first and second DD(X). The FYDP included full funding for the first DD(X) in FY07 and construction of one ship per year in each follow on year. H.R. 2863, the House Defense Appropriations Bill, added 4 additional ships: one DDG-51 class destroyer ($1.4 billion), two LCS ships (an increase of $440 million), and one additional T-AKE ($380 million). Included was a recommendation to cut the Navy's DD(X) destroyer program by a total of about $1 billion, the combination of a reduction of $0.7 billion for advance procurement and $0.3 billion out of R&D. Some $670 million would remain in R&D. The recommendation was consistent with the levels approved by the House for the DD(X) program in the National Defense Authorization Act for FY06.

The Department of Defense Appropriations Bill for FY06 included $765.992 million for the DD(X) destroyer. The DD(X) destroyer was in the construction phase and would replace the Oliver Hazard Perry class frigates and Spruance class destroyers. The FY06 appropriation conferees agreed to provide a total of $305,516,000 for advance procurement for the DD(X) class of ships instead of $320,516,000 as proposed by the Senate and no appropriation as proposed by the House. The conferees directed the Navy to include future funding requests for the DD(X) in the Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy appropriation. Within the funds provided, $221,116,000 was only for design and advance procurement requirements associated with the first ship of the DD(X) class and $84,400,000 was only for design and advance procurement requirements associated with construction of the second ship at an alternative second source shipyard. The conferees directed that no funds should be available for the procurement of long lead time material for items that are dependent upon delivery of a DD(X) key technology unless that technology has undergone testing, thereby reducing risk to overall program costs. The conferees directed that full funding of the remaining financial requirement for these ships, not including traditional advance procurement requirements, should be included in a future budget request.

The DD(X) program's demonstrations and component tests met the exit criteria for its engineering development models established by the Undersecretary's August 2004 memorandum. While progress had been made, the level of technology maturity demonstrated remained below what was recommended by best practices. Tests of several engineering development models resulted in successful demonstration of exit criteria. In other cases, tests identified technical problems that needed to be overcome before ship installation or that had led to changes in the ship design. The permanent magnet motor, a key element of the integrated power system, failed tests, and was replaced by the advanced induction motor. Because the Navy maintained the induction motor as a fallback technology, the integrated power system was able to meet the exit criteria. The substitution of the advanced induction motor changed the noise, weight, and space usage of the power system, which had implications for the ship design. The multifunction radar, a segment of the dual band radar, successfully completed the land-based testing described in the exit criteria, but the volume search radar had encountered technical problems with a key component. The advanced gun system demonstrated exit criteria through modeling, and additional component tests verified this performance. An early failure in required munitions flight testing was overcome, and two further flight tests were completed successfully.



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