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AGM-114 Hellfire Chronology

The Army began development of the Hellfire Missile System in 1974. In January 1978, in order to meet Marine Corps requirements for helicopter fired laser-guided anti-tank missiles, the Department of Defense issued a standardization recommendation that led to development of the AGM-114B. The AGM-114K has completed development and is the follow-on replacement for the AGM-114B. The AGM-114M was under development with deliveries commencing in FY01.

The Development Test and Evaluation (DT&E) launch phase of the AGM-114B was conducted from May through September 1984. The DT&E on the AGM-114K was completed in Fiscal Year (FY)93 and FY94. AGM-114M did not require a DT&E because it is the same as the AGM-114K except for the warhead.

The Operational Test (OT) for the AGM-114B was conducted from November 1984 through September 1985. The AH-1W Helicopter integration OT and the AGM-114B Missile Follow-On Test and Evaluation was conducted concurrently from December 1985 through June 1986. The Office of the Secretary of Defense waived the OT requirement for the AGM-114K due to the large number of user firings during AGM-114K development. AGM-114M did not require an OT.

Fleet introduction for the AGM-114B was granted on the AH-1W Helicopter in June 1986, and AGM-114K fleet introduction was granted for the SH-60B and the HH-60H in November 1994. Fleet introduction for the AGM-114M occured in October 2000.

HMMS Initial Operating Capability (IOC) was attained in June 1986 for the Air-to-Ground Missile (AGM)-114B and third quarter Fiscal Year 95 for the AGM-114K, and AGM-114M will attain IOC October 2000.

In FY98, a $20M congressional add provided for the procurement of 100 AGM-114M blast fragmentation warhead missiles and 100 Captive Air Training Missile CATM-114K training missiles. The CATM-114K training missiles were delivered in April 2000 and the anticipated delivery of AGM-114M is December 2000. In FY00, a $20M congressional add provided for the procurement of 225 each AGM-114K missiles to meet inventory shortfalls.

Hellfire Systems LLC, Orlando, Fla., was awarded on Sept. 27, 2001, a $9,604,320 modification to firm-fixed-price contract DAAH01-00-C-0179 to exercise not-to-exceed fiscal year 2001 options for AGM-114K Hellfire II laser guided missiles and AGM-114M blast fragmentation warhead missiles. Work will be performed in Orlando, Fla., and completion is expected by Sept. 30, 2003. This is a sole source contract. The U.S. Army Aviation & Missile Command, Redstone Arsenal, Ala., is the contracting activity.

Hellfire Systems Limited Liability Corp., Orlando, Fla., was awarded on Sept. 12, 2002, a $7,015,862 modification to a firm-fixed-price contract for exercise of not-to-exceed fiscal year 2002 options for AGM-114K-2 Hellfire II laser guided missiles and issuance of a letter contract for AGM-114M blast fragmentation warhead missiles for foreign military sales. Work will be performed in Orlando, Fla., and is expected to be completed by Sept. 30, 2012. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This is a sole source contract initiated on Aug. 1, 2002. The U. S. Army Aviation and Missile Command, Redstone Arsenal, Ala., is the contracting activity (DAAH01-00-C-0179).

Hellfire Systems L.L.C., Orlando, Fla., was awarded on March 24, 2003, a $33,374,202.99 firm-fixed-price contract for production of 867 AGM-114K3 Hellfire II laser guided missiles, 53 AGM-114M Hellfire II blast fragmentation warhead missiles, and 35 TGM-36E3 Hellfire II training guided missiles. Work will be performed in Orlando, Fla., and is expected to be completed by Dec. 31, 2005. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This was a sole source contract initiated on March 13, 2003. The U. S. Army Aviation and Missile Command, Redstone Arsenal, Ala., is the contracting activity (DAAH01-03-C-0106).

Hellfire Systems L.L.C., Orlando, Fla., was awarded on July 1, 2004, a $26,490,600 modification to a firm fixed price contract for AGM-114K2 and AGM-114K3 HELLFIRE II Laser Guided Missiles and AGM-114M HELLFIRE II Blast Fragmentation Warhead Missiles. Work will be performed in Orlando, Fla., and is expected to be completed by Oct. 31, 2006. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This was a sole source contract initiated on March 24, 2004. The U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command, Redstone Arsenal, Ala., is the contracting activity (DAAH01-03-C-0106).

On January 4, 2005 the U.S. Army executed a letter of agreement with Taiwan, setting the stage for the sale of more than 400 AGM-114M blast-fragmentation Hellfire rounds under a foreign military sales contract. The value of the Taiwan order is in the range of $50 million. The Taiwanese Hellfire purchase comprises the largest part of the U.S. government's Hellfire missile Buy 10 contract award to Lockheed Martin. The new contract equates to approximately six months of activity on the Hellfire production line at Lockheed Martin's manufacturing plant in Troy, AL.

The total US Government contract will include more than 600 AGM-114M blast fragmentation and AGM-114K high-explosive anti-tank (HEAT) rounds. It represented the largest single sale of the AGM-114M to date, either domestically or internationally. The Taiwan portion represents approximately 70 percent of the rounds to be delivered; between 5-10 percent are earmarked for Israel under FMS, with the balance going to the U.S. Army. Work on the missiles began earlier this year.

Hellfire II and Longbow Hellfire have been used in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), with more than 600 Hellfire rounds fired as of the end of 2004. At one point, the Lockheed Martin Hellfire team was asked to accelerate delivery of 84 blast fragmentation rounds, from six months to less than two weeks, to support the war effort; the missiles arrived a day ahead of schedule. Army users reported excellent Hellfire II missile performance and durability in the desert environment: According to the Hellfire II Durability Field Report from OIF, "With the amount of dust, impact shock from bouncing on the metal floor of a truck traveling at 30, 40, 50...mph across bumpy, off-road terrain, being dropped or thrown down, seeker domes exposed to dust/wind, fins grabbed in awkward ways, etc. ...the missiles.have been superb!"



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