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Future Fighting Vehicle
Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle

CV90 Mk4 BAE Systems
Griffin IIIGDLS General Dynamics
Lynx Raytheon, Rheinmetall
NGAFVSAIC
????? AM General
The focus for the armored BCT is to develop a Future Fighting Vehicle (FFV) capability for infantry and cavalry squads, eventually replacing the Bradley. The Ground Combat Vehicle [GCV] program was an Army program that had progressed through the TD phase of the acquisition lifecycle and concluded on 04 June 2014. While the Army still required a new Infantry Fighting Vehicle [IFV], it was unable to pursue the GCV program into the Engineering, Manufacturing and Development (EMO) phase, due to financial constraints. Instead, the Army had a need to continue refining design and technological concepts developed during the GCV TD Phase in support of a future Material Development Decision (MOD). The Army will continue to conduct system level trade studies and integrated assessments.

The Future Fighting Vehicle [FFV] is intended to eventually be the new infantry vehicle of the future. It could eventually replace the Bradley. It would resemble a Bradley on steroids. The Future Fighting Vehicle (FFV) program is a follow-on to the Ground Combat Vehicle [GCV] which was the canceled in 2013. FFB is largely a science-and-technology development effort, meant to help the Army explore its options while it pursues various engineering-change proposals for its existing armored vehicles.

Brig. Gen. David Bassett, program executive officer for ground combat systems, speaking at the Association of the United States Army Annual Meeting & Exposition, 20 October 2014, said "If you came today thinking we were going to describe the Future Fighting Vehicle, that we were going to tell you whether we were going to retain the nine-man squad in the back, or that we were going to have a manned or unmanned turret, or whether we'd discovered some new armor technology ... I apologize. You're not going to get any breaking news on that front."

The Army made the "difficult decision that it could do more good investing across the entire formation rather than in a specific vehicle," Bassett continued, adding that the current priority is restoring the armored brigade combat teams to their "relevancy so it can fight with all of its platforms across the entire formation."

That investment across the formation, he said, provides upgrades to current platforms and investments in science and technology. A top priority, he said, is developing the Armored Multi-Purpose Vehicle, which is a vehicle integration program that will replace the old M113 Armored Personnel Carrier. A second priority is improving the Paladin self-propelled howitzer.

The Future Fighting Vehicle Product Management Office is the focal point for the Armys next generation fighting vehicle. PdM FFVs focus is to shape requirements for the design and development of the Armys next generation Fighting Vehicle. The PdMO provides the leadership, technical expertise, and oversight for the developmental effort.

Army Contracting Command-Warren issued a sole source contract [W56HZV14C0128] 18 July 2014 pursuant to FAR 6.302-1, to BAE Systems Land & Armaments, L.P. (BAE Systems) and to General Dynamics Land Systems Inc. (GDLS) [W56HZV14C0135 ] for the acquisition of systems engineering and analysis services necessary to maintain the current level of expertise and efficiencies supporting the subsystem design effort created under the Ground Combat Vehicle effort for assessment of future technologies for a Future Fighting Vehicle (FFV) system.

The Army stated that an unacceptable delay would occur if competition were pursued. The amount of time added to the schedule is estimated to be three years of effort. The additional time can be attributed to the period associated with revising programmatic documents (3 months), developing and releasing a Request for Proposal (RFP) (6 to 9 months), receiving proposals (3 months), performing an evaluation of offers utilizing a Source Selection Evaluation Board (6 months), and, if selected, bringing another offeror up to the level of expertise that GDLS and BAE had with a design and Automotive Test Rig [ATR] that met the GCV requirements (12 to 24 months).

This action awarded a new Cost Plus Fixed Fee (CPFF), estimated 6-month Undefinitized Contractual Action (UCA) contract with BAE Systems Land and Armaments,LP. (BAE) for systems engineering and analysis services necessary to maintain the current level of expertise and efficiencies supporting the subsystem design effort created under Ground Combat Vehicle (GCV) Infantry Fighting Vehicle (IFV) Technology Development (TD) contract W56HZV-11-C-C001. The period of performance was 31 Jul 2014 to 30 Jan 2015. The requirements were funded with FY14 RDT&E funds, with a total estimated cost of $7.9M. Under the GCV TD phase contract, BAE has completed Start of Work meetings, System Requirements Reviews, System Functional Reviews, and conducted Cost and Operational Effectiveness Analyses (COEAs). In addition, the contractor built and tested sub-systems to validate critical portions of their respective vehicle designs and demonstrated how each design mitigates the specific capability gaps identified in the GCV Initial Capabilities Document (ICD) resulting in reduced technical and schedule risk for full-up prototypes.

The contract required BAE to employ systems engineering and analysis methods by conducting technical, cost, and risk assessments against selected capability requirement changes and future technologies for a Future Fighting Vehicle (FFV) system. All activities in this procurement were based on leveraging BAE's unique preliminary system design and subsystem design work developed during the GCV IFV TD Phase to continue to develop FFV system design concepts. In performance of this effort, BAE utilized the GCV TD phase integrated hybrid-electric propulsion and mobility subsystems Automotive Test Rig (ATR) and the hybrid-electric integrated propulsion subsystem (Hotbuck).

Due to the use of a hybrid-electric propulsion, the contractor was required to design and implement a calibration map for all components within their hybrid system. This supported the profile cycle testing and the characterization of component efficiencies within an integrated propulsion system. In addition, the aforementioned assets were solely designed by BAE.

Utilizing its unique GCV TD design, BAE will be required to develop and analyze system design concepts. This development effort will examine requirements, performance, and cost trade space including examining system designs that:

  • Assess variations of the Crew and Dismounted soldier size/weight mix and the quantity of dismounted soldiers
  • Host various turret configurations The contractor would provide assessments of Science and Technology (S&T) efforts, including the Combat Vehicle Prototyping (CVP), as well as private industry for subsystem or component level development of key technologies against their system designs. These technologies have a high potential for future incorporation into a next generation IFV.

This action awarded a new Cost Plus Fixed Fee (CPFF), estimated 6-month Undefinitized Contractual Action (UCA) contract with General Dynamics Land Systems (GDLS) for systems engineering and analysis services necessary to maintain the current level of expertise and efficiencies supporting the subsystem design effort created under Ground Combat Vehicle (GCV) Infantry Fighting Vehicle (IFV) Technology Development (TD) contract W56HZV-11-C-C002. The period of performance was 31 Jul 2014 to 30 Jan 2015. The requirements will be funded with FY14 RDT&E funds, with a total estimated cost of $7.9M.

The contract required GDLS to employ systems engineering and analysis methods by conducting technical, cost, and risk assessments against selected capability requirement changes and future technologies for a Future Fighting Vehicle (FFV) system. All activities in this procurement were based on leveraging GDLS' unique preliminary system design and subsystem design work developed during the GCV IFV TD Phase to continue to develop FFV system design concepts. In performance of this effort, GDLS would utilize the GCV TD phase integrated propulsion and mobility subsystems Automotive Test Rig (ATR) and the conventional drive integrated propulsion subsystem. The Scope of Work (SOW) requires the contractor to perform specialized testing and analyses that are centric to this type of technology, such as fully integrated powerpack (V12 engine, hydrokinetic/hydrostatic steer and braking 4-speed transmission, Integrated Starter generator, heat exchangers, fans). Also,the V12 engine will undergo Failure Mode Identification Testing, (FMIT).

Defense News reported in October 2018 that companies likely to emerge with offerings for OMFV include General Dynamics Land Systems, AM General and BAE Systems. AM General, designer and manufacturer of the most popular wheeled tactical vehicle HUMVEE, is widely recognized as the world leader in design, engineering, manufacturing and logistics support of Tactical Vehicles, having produced and sustained more than 300,000 vehicles in over 70 countries. AM General continues to expand its product portfolio beyond light tactical vehicles. AM Generals partnership with French Company ARQUUS to build the 12-ton armored personnel carrier Bastion APC for the US Foreign Military Sales channel is an example.

On 16 January 2020 the U.S. Army canceled the solicitation for the Section 804 Middle Tier Acquisition (MTA) Rapid Prototyping phase of the Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle (OMFV). SAIC and Bradley-maker BAE Systems did not submit bids. The Army disqualified the Raytheon-Rheinmetall team because it was unable to get a German-made Lynx to the US by 01 October 2020. only General Dynamics submitted an eligible bid.

Based on feedback and proposals received from industry, the Army has determined it is necessary to revisit the requirements, acquisition strategy and schedule before moving forward. "We remain committed to the OMFV program as it is our second-highest modernization priority, and the need for this ground combat vehicle capability is real. It is imperative we get it right for our Soldiers," said Dr. Bruce Jette, Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology.

Since its inception, the OMFV program has represented an innovative approach to Army acquisition by focusing on delivering an essentially new capability to armored brigade combat teams under a significantly reduced timeline compared to traditional acquisition efforts. "The Army asked for a great deal of capability on a very aggressive schedule," said Jette. "Despite an unprecedented number of industry days and engagements, to include a draft request for proposal over the course of nearly two years -- all of which allowed industry to help shape this competition -- it is clear a combination of requirements and schedule overwhelmed industry's ability to respond within the Army's timeline."

"The most prudent means of ensuring long-term programmatic success is to get this multi-billion-dollar effort correct," said Gen. John M. Murray, commander of Army Futures Command. "We are going to take what we have learned and apply it to the OMFV program to develop our path and build a healthy level of competition back into the program." The Army planned to revise and re-solicit the OMFV requirements on a competitive basis.

The Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle (OMPV), which will replace the Bradley Fighting Vehicle, remains on track to be fielded to both active and National Guard armored brigade combat teams starting in fiscal year 2028. About $4.6 billion is currently invested in the program from fiscal 2020-2026.

Raytheon Company and Rheinmetall Defence established a joint venture to modify their the Lynx Infantry Fighting Vehicle for the U.S. Armys Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle, (OMFV) competition. Scheduled for fielding in 2026, the OMFV is expected to replace the M2 Bradley Fighting Vehicle fighting vehicle. The new vehicle will be optimized for urban combat and rural terrain. The Army has named the OMFV as a top modernization priority supported under the services Futures Command structure. The U.S.-based joint venture is called Raytheon Rheinmetall Land Systems LLC.

The number of Bradley IFVs to be replaced exceeds 4,700 and the U.S. Armys new approach is at least two years behind the original requirement so the involvement of the Army Futures Command, which was founded specifically for this purpose, should speed up the process. During the first approach in 2019, BAE Systems initially expressed interest with the CV90 Mk IV but did not submit a bid, the Raytheon/Rheinmetall consortiums offer of the K41 Lynx was not accepted for formal reasons andy General Dynamics Land Systems (GDLS) bid with the Griffin was rejected due to technical defects.

In May 2020 the U.S. Armys G-8 discussed a new strategy for the OMFV, based on lessons learned after the first request for prototypes was canceled earlier in 2020. Despite adjustments costing the Army about $23 million in unrecoverable funds, it was still important to reset the programs azimuth in the right direction.

After pulling the solicitation, the U.S. Army garnered feedback from government and industry partners to chart the next move. U.S. Army Futures Command then adjusted the traditional requirements approach by defining a set of nine characteristics to better focus efforts. The characteristics -- survivability, mobility, growth, lethality, weight, logistics, transportability, manning, and training -- will further be refined through a cooperative and iterative process with industry, digital design competitions and Soldier touchpoints to produce the final prototypes for testing.




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Page last modified: 17-08-2020 14:22:35 ZULU