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APPENDIX D

NEO PLANNING GUIDANCE

ADVANCE PARTY OR LIAISON TEAM GUIDELINES

This section gives guidelines for establishing the advance party (or liaison team) and assigning its mission. The composition of the advance party is METT-T dependent. The political situation will normally dictate that the advance party's size be kept to a minimum, which the commander must consider when selecting personnel. Any representative that can address more than one area will enhance the effectiveness of the team. Special operations forces and civil affairs personnel are ideally suited for advance party duties. The ideal advance party size is no more than 12 to 15 and may comprise any of the following (asterisks denote key skills):

  • * Team commander.

  • Personnel representative.

  • * Intelligence representative.

  • * Operations representative.

  • Aviation representative.

  • Engineer representative.

  • * Logistics representative.

  • * Medical representative.

  • Purchasing or contracting officer.

  • Finance officer.

  • * Civil affairs representative.

  • * PSYOP representative.

  • * Signal representative.

  • Military police representative.

  • Counterintelligence representative.

  • * Air Force (airlift) and or Navy (sealift) representative.

  • Transportation representative.

  • Public affairs representative.

  • NBC specialist.

The advance party (or liaison team) coordinates with the JTF headquarters and prepares the airfield or port and main evacuation site. To accomplish this, it may split into two groups, the embassy party and the evacuation site party. Following are duties each group performs. The embassy party--

  • Confirms US embassy's evacuation plan for the country.

  • Determines the exact number of evacuees, equipment and materiel to be evacuated.

  • Obtains most current list of evacuees and locations.

  • Determines type of identification documents evacuees will need.

  • Identifies special considerations or priorities in evacuating personnel (to include medical) and equipment.

  • Determines location of assembly areas, evacuation sites, and primary and alternate routes and confirms their suitability.

  • Conducts area reconnaissance to confirm compatibility of the evacuation plan with the host nation's current situation.

  • Assesses landing zones.

  • Assesses drop zones for possible opposed entry operations and resupply operations.

  • Acquires PIR and updated intelligence estimates.

  • Identifies potential threats.

  • Determines measures to enhance security (OPSEC, physical security, and so forth).

  • Acquires imagery, maps, photos, building plans, and city plans.

  • Identifies special communications requirements. It physically establishes routine and special communications links.

  • Determines administrative and logistics requirements, especially those relating to evacuee needs.

  • Determines full extent of operational, logistics, medical, and administrative support available, to include HN support.

  • Establishes funding authority and points of contact for HN support.

  • Coordinates procedures for addressing the news media.

  • Briefs all concerned on evacuation force's concept of operations.

  • Reports to the JTF commander.

  • Identifies and solves potential joint and combined interoperability problems.

  • Determines priority for exchange of liaison officers (LOs).

  • Confirms the ROE with the COM. It wargames the ROE to establish consensus on how to handle special situations.

  • Identifies cultural nuances.

  • Procure additional translator support.

  • Confirms chain of command. Is it the same in all geographic locations of the country? Is it the same for all phases of the operation?

    The evacuation site party--

  • Assesses evacuation site for suitability.

  • Establishes and organizes the evacuation site.

  • Prepares the site for arrival of the main body.

  • Establishes communications between the embassy and the evacuation site.

  • Plans the layout of the processing center.

  • Validates the CA and PSYOP supporting plan.

  • Obtains COM approval for execution of CA and PSYOP supporting plan and PSYOP products and actions.

  • Establishes and maintains required coordination links with embassy and other government agency representatives for planning and execution of special operations.

  • Establishes continuous intelligence flow to and from the embassy.

  • Establishes the operations center.

  • Confirms suitability of airfield or port facilities and availability of material handling equipment.

ROUTINE INFORMATION REQUESTS

The EAP or the CONPLAN should contain most information required by the JTF planners. If not provided, the following information should be obtained:

  • What is the end state that will dictate mission success?

  • Who will be the senior American official in charge of the evacuation?

  • Who will give the command the approval that the mission has been completed?

  • Will all US mission officials be leaving? If not, who will stay behind?

  • Will someone from the US mission be available to help screen the evacuees?

  • Is there any intelligence needed immediately from the evacuees?

  • Can detailed screening be postponed until evacuees reach the safehaven?

  • What screening procedures are expected of the evacuation force?

  • Will the host nation assist in securing the evacuation site?

  • Are alternate evacuation sites available?

  • Does the evacuation force have permission to drop ground sensors? Insert reconnaissance elements? When?

  • What actions should be taken concerning evacuees who are not on the list of evacuees?

  • How many unaccompanied children will need escorts? Will the embassy provide escorts?

  • What discipline problems are expected from the evacuees? Who are the potential troublemakers?

  • What action should be taken if there is an outbreak of violence among the evacuees?

  • What action should be taken if someone asks for political asylum?

  • Will the consular officer or his designee be available to assist during the evacuation?

  • Are there any evacuees, especially wardens, who can help marshal, screen, and process the evacuees?

  • Is anyone available to assist in physically searching the female evacuees?

  • What proof of American citizenship and evacuee status is required? Are there sample identifications (IDs)?

  • Will food be required?

  • What action should be taken if a mission official refuses evacuation?

  • Will soldiers be sent after US mission evacuees?

  • Will the evacuation force be required to secure the mission?

  • Is there any sensitive equipment or material to be destroyed or evacuated?

  • Will a list of those actually evacuated be required?

  • Are there procedures to handle claims against the US government?

  • What is the likelihood of terrorist activities?

  • If the evacuation force is not permitted to carry weapons, how will weapons and ammunitions be supplied in case of need?

  • What local cultural nuances and customs should the evacuation force know to avoid confrontation?

  • What specfic items should be considered to be contraband?

  • Has the unit OPLAN, CINC CONPLAN, and embassy EAP been reviewed?

  • Is a permissive, uncertain, or hostile NEO anticipated? How best can it be medically supported?

  • Has direct liaison with embassy health officials been made?

  • What is the medical threat pertinent to this operation?

  • Are there medical problems (such as epidemic diseases) the evacuation force should be aware of?

  • What are the preventive medicine requirements pertinent to this operation?

  • Have additionally required medical essential elements of information and requests for information been identified to the JTF intelligence section?

  • What are the medical policies and procedures that should be established pertinent to this operation?

  • What is the coordination required among operational developers?

  • How many of the noncombatants are known to require medical care?

  • Where are these noncombatants located? Is there a published plan addressing their collection prior to evacuation?

  • Are there any civilian casualty projections for the NEO?

  • What is the medical evacuation policy for NEO patients?

  • What is the policy concerning seriously wounded evacuees? Should they have priority over all other evacuees?

  • Are sufficient items such as litters, straps, and blankets available?

  • Has the Department of State authorized pets to accompany NEO evacuees? Are any animals prohibited from US entry by the Department of Agriculture or Public Health Service?

  • What will be done with pets brought to the evacuation control points?

  • What coordination has been effected with HN local and national media to support NEO mission and CA or PSYOP supporting plan?

  • Will HN local and national media support NEO mission and CA or PSYOP efforts?

POSSIBLE DILEMMAS

All NEO operations are unique. Situations may arise that require special considerations. Evacuation force personnel should be briefed and prepared to deal with the following:

  • Questions concerning use of deadly force or a given weapon system in a given situation. When is use of deadly force authorized?

  • Interpretation of the ROE. Good intelligence allows detailed ROE, diminishing the need for service members to interpret the ROE.

  • Hostile detainee who presents himself or is captured by the evacuation force.

  • Civil disturbance, from passive resistance or civil disobedience through violence.

  • Terrorism.

  • Snipers.

  • Nonambulatory evacuees.

  • Evacuees with special medical needs: pregnancy, infectious diseases, certain exceptional family members, pediatric health care problems, psychiatric problems.

  • Evacuee suffering from trauma resulting from current situation.

  • Language problems.

  • Religious problems.

  • Potential evacuee's name not on list provided by the embassy but appearing to be bona fide evacuee.

  • Deaths of evacuees; evacuation of remains.

  • Listed evacuees or unlisted potential evacuee with IDs unknown to the evacuation force.

  • Evacuees carrying contraband, and disposition of the contraband.

  • Evacuee desiring to bring pet.

  • Evacuee desiring to bring excess luggage.

  • Overwhelming number of civilians presenting themselves at assembly areas or at the evacuation site to request evacuation.

  • Listed evacuee refusing evacuation.

  • Disruptive evacuee.

  • Evacuee attempting to give bribe to gain favor.

  • Inaccurate evacuation lists.

EVACUATION CONTROL CENTER CONSIDERATIONS

The following are considerations for planning, establishing, and operating the ECC:

  • Barriers to restrict entry.

  • External security--US or HN forces.

  • Internal security.

  • Control of internal movement.

  • Marking of internal routes and stations.

  • Escorts.

  • Baggage handlers.

  • Protection for force and evacuees from direct and indirect fire.

  • Reception area.

  • Evacuee briefing.

  • Male and female latrines at reception comfort, and any station where wait will be long.

  • Pet areas for sanitation and control.

  • Complete prioritized roster of all evacuees.

  • Health and comfort items.

  • Mass casualty (MASCAL).

  • Procedures to ensure MEDEVACed noncombatants are processed.

  • Medical screening-injuries, contagious diseases.

  • Special drugs for shots, chemoprophylaxis (immunizations).

  • Medical treatment element.

  • Medical treatment area.

  • Litter bearers.

  • Feminine hygiene supplies.

  • Travel comfort items--motion sickness bags, antinauseants.

  • Amnesty box.

  • Private weapons turn-in point-receipts, control.

  • Search of baggage, evacuees-metal detectors, explosive/drug dogs.

  • Family continuity.

  • Courteous treatment of evacuees.

  • EOD pit near inspection area.

  • Reaction forces-combat forces, MP, EOD, medical teams.

  • Female personnel for inspections.

  • Special areas for persons requiring thorough inspections, special handling, detention, and so forth.

  • Security badge system.

  • Qualified counterintelligence personnel for debrief and screening.

  • Evacuees screened for locations of other evacuees or threats.

  • Receipt for, and safeguard of, valuables.

  • Identification of missing persons.

  • Next-of-kin record.

  • Baggage tagged for embarkation.

  • Passenger manifests.

  • Safety and preflight briefings.

  • Evacuees issued helmets, life vests, hearing protection.

  • Baggage restrictions.

  • Public affairs officer (PAO) briefings, escorts.

  • VIP procedures.

  • Protection from adverse weather.

  • Interpreters or language cards at each station.

  • Department of State representatives to resolve problems.

  • Procedures for claims against the government--record and pass to Department of State representative.

  • Procedures for disciplinary problems-soldiers, evacuees.

  • Chaplains.

  • Private counseling areas.

  • Evacuees possessing special skills, such as doctors, nurses, and interpreters, or volunteers to assist as needed.

  • Refreshments and food.

  • Handcuffs and restraints.

  • Public address system.

  • Bedding.

  • Box or safe for valuables.

  • Provisions for excess baggage.

  • Provisions for animals.

  • Supplies for infants.

  • Special diet requirements.

  • Classified material containers.

  • Procedures for emergency destruction.

  • Immediate resupply if hostilities escalate.

ISB CONSIDERATIONS

This section outlines considerations in planning for, establishing, and operating the ISB. Facilities that may be required are--

  • Dining/kitchen (troops and evacuees).

  • Billeting (officer/enlisted, civilian-male/female/family).

  • Sanitation/latrines (male/female).

  • Maintenance.

  • Airfield/seaport.

  • Storage (perishables, medical, classified, bulk POL, ammunition).

  • Communications (tactical and HN telephone).

  • Recreation.

  • Fueling.

  • Utilities.

  • Medical.

  • Supplies and services that maybe required are--

  • Rigging.

  • Transportation (rolling stock, forklifts, busses).

  • POL.

  • Generators.

  • Communications.

  • Water.

  • Laundry and shower.

  • Medical.

  • Subsistence.

  • Maintenance (including AVUM/AVIM).

  • Air traffic control.

  • Procurement and contracting.

STAFF GUIDELINES

The J1/K1 prepares his portion of the staff estimate. Other responsibilities include--

  • Develop in conjunction with combat health support personnel a medical assessment of the NEO area of operations.

  • Obtain legal augmentation for the JTF.

  • Obtain and disseminate updated lists of evacuees.

  • Obtain and disseminate information on contraband.

  • Establish procedures for inspection of evacuees and collection of contraband and weapons.

  • Brief force on status of third country noncombatants seeking evacuation or refuge.

  • Be prepared to process claims.

  • Determine the need for and provide ID tags for evacuees.

  • Provide adequate supplies of the following forms:

      - Waiver of Evacuation Opportunity.

      - Waiver of Claims for Damages and Injury.

      - Evacuee Information Card.

      - DD Form 2585.

  • Establish provisions for handling VIPs.

  • Review other planning and guidelines for applicability and coordination.

The J2/S2 prepares his portion of staff estimate. In addition, he--

  • Procures and distributes imagery, maps, city plans, and embassy building plans.

  • Determines PIR.

  • Verifies location of evacuees.

  • Verifies location of evacuation sites.

  • Verifies and recons routes to assembly areas.

  • Verifies HN military capabilities and reliability.

  • Develops plan to screen and debrief evacuees in assembly areas and evacuation sites.

  • Coordinates for counterintelligence, interrogation of detainees, and interpreter support.

  • Requests additional intelligence assets or products as required.

The J3/S3 prepares his portion of staff estimate. Further, he--

  • Procures and reviews CINC CONPLAN for NEO area of operations.

  • Procures and reviews the EAP.

  • Requests diplomatic clearance.

  • Based on METT-T, requests additional assets beyond the capability of the JTF.

  • Plans fire support: land, Naval, and Air Force.

  • Clearly defines chain of command and command relationships above unit level.

  • Conducts persona1 reconnaissance of evacuation site, if possible.

  • Obtains guidance on employment of riot control agents.

  • Establishes reports required at this and higher headquarters.

  • Determines if any joint or combined interoperability issues exist and emphasizes communications, doctrine, procedures, and ammunition.

  • Establishes terrain management responsibilities throughout the area of operations.

  • Facilitates the conduct of rehearsals.

  • Plans time for troop leading procedures.

  • Obtains or develops ROE for the operation. He seeks guidance from CINC and Department of State and coordinates with staff judge advocate for legal review.

  • Reviews other planning guidelines for applicability and coordination.

The J4/S4 prepares his portion of staff estimate. Further, he--

  • Acquires HN logistics support identified by the J5/S5 that is required for the mission.

  • Obtains local purchase authority.

  • Ensures contracting officer or PO is assigned to the force.

  • Ensures adequate funds in local currency are available to meet local procurement requirements.

  • Determines requirements for procurement of subsistence and water and requests food service, water supply team, and veterinary and preventive medicine personnel, if required.

  • Reviews other planning guidelines for applicability and coordination.

The PSYOP officer prepares the PSYOP portion of the estimate. He also--

  • Advises the commander on PSYOP-related matters.

  • Works under staff supervision of the operations officer (J3/S3/G3).

  • Prepares the PSYOP annex or appendix of the OPLAN/OPORD.

  • Serves as liaison between commander and staff and the supporting PSYOP organization.

  • Coordinates and monitors execution of PSYOP campaign to support NEO.

  • Coordinates with staff PAO and embassy PAO and USIS director to ensure themes and messages are congruent.

The J5/S5 prepares his portion of staff estimate. In addition, he--

  • Briefs force on customs of HN and evacuees.

  • Reviews the embassy's NEO plan with key embassy staff and JTF staff members.

  • Advises the commander on the civil-military aspects and implications of the military portion of the NEO plan.

  • Briefs the force on the social, economic, political, and cultural climate in the HN.

  • Provides up-to-date information on change in that climate and works closely with the primary staff elements during all phases of the operation.

  • Advises on provisions and guidelines for taking care of women, infants, and children and disabled, sick, and injured evacuees.

  • Identifies foreign nation and nongovernment organization resources available for support to the operation, to include material handling equipment, transportation assets, subsistence, water, shelter, medicine, and other relief supplies.

  • Performs liaison with the embassy, to include acting as a communications link with US forces in the area of operations.

  • Recommends actions to the commander to minimize HN population interference with all supporting military operations.

  • Supports the operation of evacuation sites, reception and or processing stations, and holding areas for non-US nationals who are denied evacuation.

  • Screens and briefs evacuees.

  • Assists in the identification of US citizens and others to be evacuated.

The J6/signal officer prepares signal portion of staff estimate. He--

  • Analyzes SOI for joint and combined interoperability requirements.

  • Develops coded execution checklists.

  • Ensures all stations can communicate as required, using all available systems. He also ensures that communications redundancy, alternative active nets and sufficient backup systems, is achieved for each net.

  • Obtains telephone listings for persons and activities that may be needed during the operation (such as wardens, embassy, police, military).

  • Ensures availability of secure communications, including facsimile (fax).

  • Reviews other planning guidelines for applicability and coordination.

The engineer officer prepares the engineer portion of the staff estimate. He also must--

  • Determine suitability of ground transportation mutes.

  • Determine barrier material requirements for security of evacuation sites, assembly areas, and so forth.

  • Determine engineer requirements to upgrade HN facilities.

The JTF surgeon is responsible for the health of the task force and evacuees. He--

  • Evaluates the sufficiency of HN medical support.

  • Determines US medical support requirements that must complement or replace HN medical support.

  • Ensures adequate combat health support (CHS) to evacuees while in the care of the JTF. He plans sufficient CHS to accommodate the special needs of evacuees (pregnancies, combat stress intervention and so forth).

  • Ensures medical threats in the area of operations are appropriately identified and appropriate preventive medicine measures implemented.

  • Prepares health estimate for the task force commander.

  • Coordinates the CHS annex to the operation order with participating JTF component commanders and surgeons. He ensures CHS plan optimally employs CHS assets within the JTF and the host nation. The CHS plan will ensure continuity and sustainability of CHS in the following areas:

      - Hospitalization (either organic to the JTF or host nation).

      - Medical evacuation.

      - Veterinary services (wholesomeness and quality of food and food sources and the care and disposition of government-owned animals and pets).

      - Preventive medicine (identification of the medical threat, and recommended preventive medicine measures to counter the threat).

      - Medical command, control, communications, and information.

      - Health service logistics, including blood management.

      - Combat stress control.

      - Emergency dental services.

      - Emergency medical treatment.

The public affairs officer prepares the public affairs annex of the staff estimate. He--

  • Advises the commander on public affairs matters.

  • Develops and disseminates command guidance on release of information.



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