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Appendix B

MSE Interoperability

This appendix focuses on the three methods used to interface the ACUS and the Army Tactical Communications System (ATACS) equipped units, and it also covers data communications. Interoperability and connectivity between an MSE equipped corps/division and one unequipped corps/division are accomplished in several ways. The three methods covered show how an MSE SENS (AN/TTC-48) interfaces with an IATACS switch (AN/TTC-41). Interfacing requires slight modifications to the AN/TTC-41 and AN/TTC-48. The three methods of making this ACUS interconnection are-

    • Method 1: Type V circuit card to Type I circuit card.
    • Method 2: Type V circuit card to Type II circuit card.
    • Method 3: Type VI circuit card to Type VI circuit card (the preferred method).

INTERFACE METHOD 1 - TYPE V to TYPE I

 

B-1. Method 1 interfaces the IATACS switch card to the SENS. (See Figure B-1.) The database entries for method 1 are very minor, but require extensive operator intervention.

 

Figure B-1. MSE-IATACS Interface Method 1 - Type V to Type I

 

B-2. Method 1 achieves reliable voice communications across the MSE/IATACS boundary. The MSE operator must use a TA-312 telephone that is wired in parallel with the SENS dial central office (DCO) terminal. This sends a ringdown signal to the IATACS operator. Telephone calls cannot be automatically routed across the networks, and both operators must intercept and extend calls. Method 1 has the disadvantage that the SENS loses its ability to interface with a public switch.

B-3. Method 1 does not achieve data communications across the MSE/IATACS boundary. Data communications are from computer-to-computer. With MSE, the computers are configured for digital connection to the DSVT or DNVT. With IATACS, the computers are configured for analog modem connection. These configurations are not compatible with each other.

B-4. The following procedures network IATACS with MSE using interface method 1:

  • The two switchboards are connected with field wire. A TA-312 is attached to the same terminals that send a ringdown signal to the SB-3614A. The signal alerts the IATACS operator that a call is coming in from the MSE operator.
  • This interface does not allow automatic routing between the two networks. MSE network subscribers are given the SENS CSP number (LNXXXXX) and must place calls to the IATACS network through the SENS operator. IATACS network subscribers are given the MSE network area code (November Yankee X-ray [NYX]) and the designated MSE interface number assigned to the DCO line. They must place calls to the MSE network through the IATACS operator. The MSE operator intercepts all calls from the IATACS network on the DCO lines. The SENS operator extends calls into the MSE network in the normal manner.
  • This method does not require any additional circuit cards, but does require a TA-312 (from the IATACS network) and some database changes.
  NOTE: See TM 11-5800-216-10-1.
  B-5. MSE system planning required for operation is as follows:

  • Publish the SENS CSP DNVT phone number as the operator accesses the AN/TTC-41 network.
  • Provide the SENS operator with phone directories for the AN/TTC-41 network and the MSE network, since calls from both networks are intercepted at the SENS.
  • Determine if the adjacent network meets security requirements. Instruct gateway SENS to clear NSW tone when appropriate.
 

B-6. IATACS system planning required for operation is as follows:

  • Publish the area code of the MSE network.
  • Publish the directory number of the Type I terminals as another access to the MSE SENS operator. A fixed directory number could be assigned to simplify the dialing instructions for the network.
  • The AN/TTC-41 operator should provide the SENS operator with directory assistance in the AN/TTC-41 network.

INTERFACE METHOD 2 - TYPE V to TYPE II

  B-7. Method 2 is similar to method 1. (See Figure B-2.) Method 2 interfaces the SB-3614A (AN/TTC-41) with the SENS (AN/TTC-48). The database entries for method 2 are minor, but they require significant SENS operator intervention.

 


Figure B-2. MSE-IATACS Interface Method 2 - Type V to Type II

 

B-8. . Method 2 also achieves reliable voice communications across the MSE/IATACS boundary. The telephone calls cannot be automatically routed across the networks. The SENS operator must extend all calls from or into the IATACS network. Method 2, like method 1, has the disadvantage that the SENS loses its ability to connect to a DCO.

B-9. Method 2 does not achieve data communications across the MSE/IATACS boundary for the same reasons described for method 1.

B-10. MSE system planning required for operation is as follows:

  • Publish the SENS CSP DNVT phone number as the operator accesses the IATACS network.
  • Provide the SENS operator with phone directories for the IATACS network and the MSE network since the SENS intercepts all calls from both networks.
  • Determine if the adjacent network meets security requirements. Instruct gateway SENS to clear NSW tone when appropriate.

B-11. IATACS system planning required for operation is as follows:

  • Publish the NYX area code of the MSE network. Assign digits that are easy to remember.
  • Publish the directory number of the Type II terminals as another access to the MSE SENS operator. A fixed directory number could be assigned to simplify the dialing instructions for the network.
  • The AN/TTC-41 operator should provide the SENS operator with directory assistance in the IATACS network.

INTERFACE METHOD 3 -TYPE VI to TYPE VI

 

B-12. Method 3 interfaces the MSE SENS to an IATACS network using Type VI tone burst confirmation trunking cards in both systems (NCS MSE version or lower software). (See Figure B-3.) The database entries for method 3 are significant.

Figure B-3. MSE-IATACS Interface Method 3 - Type II to Type VI

 

B-13. Method 3 achieves reliable voice communications across the MSE/ IATACS boundary. It allows calls to route automatically between the networks without operator intervention. Implementing this method requires installing additional circuit cards into the SENS. The IATACS network furnishes these cards. This method has the advantage of automatically routing calls across the networks and retaining the SENS ability to interface with a public switch. It also extends the distance between the SENS and IATACS switches.

B-14. Method 3 provides the SENS with analog subscriber loop ability. This allows computers in both networks to be configured for analog modem connection; therefore, protocols would be compatible. Using this method, the Tactical Army Combat Service Support (CSS) Computer System (TACCS) data communications across the MSE/IATACS boundary are successful, but MCS data communications are not. The MCS software aborts the data transmission before the communication systems achieve terminal connection. When the MSE system is expanded, TACCS data communications across the MSE/IATACS boundary become marginal. (See Figure B-4.)

Figure B-4. MSE/IATACS Expanded Network

DATA COMMUNICATIONS

  B-15. MCS data communications do not work across the MSE/IATACS boundary (digital/analog). TACCS communications are marginal due to frequency repeatability degradation above 2000 hertz (Hz). For passing data across the MSE/IATACS boundary, unused channels of the multichannel system connecting the MSE and IATACS switches are used. Method 3 provides four common-user analog trunks for MSE/IATACS connectivity which leaves eight unused channels that could be dedicated to MCS or TACCS gateway functions. CNR could also be used as a gateway to bridge the MSE/IATACS boundary.

B-16. If an MCS in the MSE network wanted to send a message to an MCS in the IATACS network, it would send the message to the MSE gateway MCS. The IATACS gateway MCS will examine the message header and nodal address and automatically route the call over channel 1 to the appropriate MCS user in the IATACS network.

B-17. Figure B-5 shows the setup for single MCS gateways.

 

Figure B-5. Single MCS Gateway

  B-18. Figure B-6 shows the setup for the dual MCS gateway.

Figure B-6. Dual MCS Gateway



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