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APPENDIX A

ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURES

A-1. ECHELONS ABOVE CORPS (EAC) AVIATION BRIGADES

a. Mission.

(1) EAC aviation brigades (Figure A-1) support EAC, corps, and division operations. Based on organizational structure, EAC brigades conduct combat, combat support (CS), combat service support (CSS) according to theater operational requirements. EAC aviation brigades conduct joint, combined, and combined arms maneuver operations, and support theater special operations forces (SOF).

(2) EAC aviation units primarily support subordinate tactical units in the corps and divisions, although EAC units may be required to conduct theater rear area security. These units may also serve as a tactical reserve.

b. Structure. An EAC brigade is designed, tailored, and configured for the specific theater in which it operates. EAC brigades are organized by the Army component commander based on the mission guidance from the theater commander-in-chief (CINC). The brigade may be organized with any combination of attack, reconnaissance, assault, CH-47 Chinook, fixed-wing, and maintenance units; however, the normal structure would include a headquarters and headquarters company (HHC); one UH-60 Black Hawk-equipped command aviation battalion (CAB); one fixed-wing theater aviation battalion; one CH-47 Chinook-equipped theater helicopter battalion; and one air traffic services (ATS) battalion. The theater Army area command (TMCOM) will provide an aviation intermediate maintenance (AVIM) company to each EAC brigade.

A-2. CORPS AVIATION BRIGADE

a. Mission.

(1) The corps aviation brigade (Figure A-2) primarily conducts attack, reconnaissance, security, air assault, command and control (C2), and air movement operations throughout the corps area of operations (AO). The corps aviation brigade plans, coordinates, and executes aviation operations in support of the corps scheme of maneuver; it can be expected to operate anywhere in the corps area. Attack helicopter units destroy enemy forces by fire and maneuver. Assault and CH-47 Chinook helicopter units transport combat personnel, supplies, and equipment for corps operations. Helicopters are provided to corps units requiring heliborne C2 assets. ATS are provided for Army airspace command and control (A2C2) integration, airspace information, and terminal and forward area support services.

Figure A-2. Corps aviation brigade

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(2) The corps aviation brigade may operate directly for the corps commander or be placed under operational control (OPCON) of a subordinate division. The corps commander can task organize other corps assets under the command of the corps aviation brigade or task organize the corps aviation brigade to support an armored cavalry regiment (ACR). In corps without ACRs, the aviation brigade may be tasked to be the covering force headquarters.

b. Structure. Aviation brigades are organic to all US Army corps. Among the corps, there will be some differences concerning composite unit (COMPO) designations, but the organizations are basically similar throughout the Army. The corps aviation brigade is composed of one HHC, one aviation group, and one attack regiment.

(1) The aviation group consists of an aviation group HHC; an assault helicopter battalion (AHB); a command aviation battalion (CAB); a combat support aviation battalion (CSAB); a CH-47 Chinook helicopter battalion; a light utility helicopter (LUH) battalion; and an assigned ATS battalion.

(2) The attack regiment consists of a regimental HHC and three AH-64 Apache attack helicopter battalions (ATKHBs). Corps attack regiments receive C2 support from the corps CAB, while CS and CSS are provided from the corps CSAB.

(3) Corps support command (COSCOM) provides an AVIM battalion to support the corps aviation brigade.

c. Utility helicopter support. The aviation brigade commander is key to the integration of the corps' aviation resources. The CAB, CSAB, and LUH support the aviation brigade as well as the corps with utility aircraft. The CSAB and LUH battalions also will provide CSS to the brigade's CH-47 Chinook battalion, AVUM units, and the attached AVIM battalion. Habitual relationships, standard procedures, and regular training will facilitate this integration. The brigade staff will routinely plan and coordinate CAB and CSAB support for the attack battalions. In addition, the brigade commander will ensure that programs are established that reenforce collective training proficiency between the CAB/CSAB/LUH and the units they are required to support.

A-3. DIVISION AVIATION BRIGADES

a. Mission.

(1) The division aviation brigade conducts all aviation combat, CS, and CSS missions (except ATS and fixed-wing operations) in support of the division scheme of maneuver. The primary mission of the division aviation brigade is to find, fix, and destroy enemy forces within the division area. The division aviation brigade can accomplish this mission as an aviation-pure or task-organized force.

(2) The division aviation brigade may be supported by higher echelon aviation assets. The division aviation brigade must be prepared to support these assets throughout the duration of any given operation.

b. Structures. Aviation brigades are organic to all Army divisions. The designs of the aviation brigades have been tailored to meet the specific needs of the parent division, whether it be heavy, light, airborne, or air assault.

(1) Heavy division aviation brigade. The primary mission of the heavy division aviation brigade (Figure A-3) is to engage and destroy threat armored and mechanized forces. The heavy division aviation brigade is composed of a brigade HHC; one divisional cavalry squadron; one general support aviation battalion (GSAB); and two ATKHBs.

(a) The heavy division cavalry squadron consists of an HHT, an AVUM troop, three armored cavalry troops, and two air cavalry troops (ACTs). The two ACTs will be equipped with either eight OH-58D Kiowa Warriors or eight AH-1 Cobras each. In either case, the ACTs will be aircraft pure.

(b) The heavy division GSAB consists of a battalion HHC; a command aviation company (CAC) with eight UH-60s; six OH-58A/C Kiowas; and three EH-60 Black Hawks; two support aviation companies (SACs) with eight UH-60s each; and an AVUM company.

(c) The heavy division requires two ATKHBs. The attack battalions are AH-64s or AH-1 pure. An attack battalion consists of an HHC; an AVUM company; and three attack helicopter companies (ATKHCs) equipped with eight attack aircraft each.

(d) The division support command (DISCOM) supports the division aviation brigade with an aviation support battalion (ASB) AVIM unit. The ASB has no organic aircraft.

(e) Utility helicopter support. The aviation brigade commander is the primary integrator of aviation assets within the division. The GSAB will provide support to the division, aviation brigade, cavalry squadron, the attack battalions, and the ASB. The aviation brigade will allocate resources based on mission, enemy, terrain, troops, and time available (METT-T); the scheme of maneuver; availability of assets; and the priorities set by the brigade commander. In addition, the brigade commander will ensure that programs are established that reinforce collective training proficiency between the GSAB and the units they are required to support.

(2) Light division aviation brigade. The primary mission of the light division aviation brigade (Figure A-4) is to conduct combat operations against light threat forces. The light division aviation brigade is composed of a brigade HHC; one divisional cavalry squadron; one AHB; and one ATKHB.

(a) The light division cavalry squadron consists of an HHT, an AVUM troop, one ground cavalry troop, and two ACTs. The two ACTs will be equipped with either eight OH-58Ds or eight AH-1s each. In either case, the ACTs will be aircraft pure.

(b) The light division AHB consists of an HHC, an AVUM company, a CAC with 8 UH-60s and 3 EH-60s, and 2 assault companies with 15 UH-60s each.

(c) The light division ATKHB consists of an HHC, an AVUM company, and three ATKHCs equipped with 8 OH-58Ds or 8 AH-1s each.

(d) The DISCOM supports the division aviation brigade with an AVIM company. The AVIM company has no organic aircraft.

(e) Utility helicopter support. The aviation brigade commander is the primary integrator of aviation within the division. The assault battalion supports the aviation brigade as well as the division with utility aircraft. The attack battalion, cavalry squadron, and the attached AVIM company will be supported by the assault battalion for C2, CS, CSS, and CSAR. The brigade commander will ensure that programs are established to reinforce collective training proficiency between the AHB and the units they are required to support.

(3) Airborne division aviation brigade. The primary mission of the airborne division aviation brigade (figure A-5) is to rapidly deploy anywhere in the world and conduct combat operations. These combat operations will usually include link-up with follow-on forces at a later time. The airborne division aviation brigade is composed of a brigade HHC, one divisional cavalry squadron, one AHB, and one ATKHB.

(a) The airborne division cavalry squadron consists of an HHT, an AVUM troop, one ground reconnaissance troop, and three air cavalry troops (ACT) with eight OH-58Ds each.

(b) The airborne division AHB consists of an HHC, an AVUM company, a CAC with 8 UH-60s and 3 EH-60s, and two assault companies with 15 UH-60s each.

(c) The airborne division ATKHB consists of an HHC, an AVUM company, and three ATKHCs equipped with eight OH-58Ds each.

(d) The DISCOM supports the aviation brigade with an AVIM company. The AVIM company has no organic aircraft.

(e) Utility helicopter support. The aviation brigade commander is the primary integrator of aviation within the division. The assault battalion supports the division as well as the aviation brigade. Having no utility aircraft in the attack battalion requires brigade to support the moving of Class I, III, and V and resources. The ATKHB, the cavalry squadron, and the attached AVIM company will be supported by the assault battalion for C2, CS, CSS, and CSAR. In addition, the brigade commander will ensure that programs are established that reinforce collective training proficiency between the AHB and the units they are required to support.

(4) Air assault division aviation brigade. The primary mission of the air assault division aviation brigade (Figure A-6) is to deploy worldwide on short notice; plan, coordinate, and execute aviation operations as an integrated element of an air assault combined arms team; and find, fix, and destroy enemy forces in joint, combined, or unilateral operations. The air assault division aviation brigade is composed of a brigade HHC; one divisional cavalry squadron; one CH-47 Chinook helicopter battalion; three AHBs; one CAB; and three ATKHBs.

Figure A-6. Air assault division aviation brigade

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(a) The air assault division cavalry squadron consists of an HHT; an AVUM troop; and four ACTs. The four ACTs will be equipped with eight OH-58Ds each.

(b) The air assault division CH-47 Chinook helicopter battalion consists of an HHC and three CH-47 Chinook helicopter companies with 16 CH-47Ds in each company.

(c) The air assault division's three AHBs each consist of an HHC; an AVUM company; and two assault helicopter companies (AHCs) with 15 UH-60s in each company. The limited assets of the support aviation company in the CAB will require the assault companies to perform utility missions as well.

(d) The air assault division CAB consists of an HHC; an AVUM company; two CACs with eight UH-60s each; and a SAC with eight UH-60s and three EH-60s.

(e) The air assault division's three ATKHBs each consist of an HHC; an AVUM company; and three ATKHCs equipped with eight AH-64s each.

(f) The DISCOM supports the aviation brigade with an AVIM battalion. The AVIM battalion has no organic aircraft.

(g) Utility helicopter support. The aviation brigade commander is the primary integrator of aviation within the division. The CAB supports the division as well as the aviation brigade. Utility aircraft support for the attack battalions, cavalry squadron, the CH-47 Chinook battalion, and the attached AVIM battalion will come from the CAB and the assault battalions. The brigade staff will routinely plan for utility support from the CAB and the assault battalions to the attack battalions, cavalry squadron and CH-47 Chinook battalion. In addition, the brigade commander will ensure that programs are established to reinforce collective training proficiency between the CAB and assault battalion and the units they are required to support.

A-4. ARMORED CAVALRY REGIMENTS

a. Armored cavalry regiment (heavy). The ACR is a self-contained combined arms organization composed of armored cavalry squadrons (ACSs); an aviation squadron; a support squadron; and separate combat support companies and batteries. The ACR is a separate unit that supports the corps or a joint task force. It is often reinforced by corps combat support units and divisional maneuver battalions. The ACR operates independently over a wide area and at extended distances from other units. The ACR is a highly mobile armored force capable of fighting the fully mechanized threat in the environmental states of war or conflict. The ACR may be rapidly deployed to a theater of operations by sealift. When supporting a light corps, limitations may exist in corps support capabilities, strategic mobility, and terrain restrictions.

The regimental aviation squadron (RAS) (Figure A-7) provides the regiment with combat aviation assets. It is organized with air cavalry/reconnaissance troops; attack helicopter troops; and an assault helicopter troop. The squadron adds a very responsive, terrain-independent movement capability to the regiment. Maneuverability and flexibility of the RAS enhance the combat flexibility of the regiment. The RAS may operate independently of, or in close coordination with, the ACS, or it may provide troops to the ACS.

b. Armored cavalry regiment (light). The ACR(L) is a self-contained combined arms organization capable of being packaged and rapidly deployed by air or sealift as part of a force projection Army responding rapidly to contingencies, worldwide. Its role may be traditional, initial entry, or follow-on. The traditional role would support a US corps or TF through a reconnaissance, security, and economy-of-force capability. As an initial entry force, the ACR(L) would support Army or joint task force operations with a credible force as a demonstration of US resolve. In the follow-on role, the ACR(L) will follow an opposed entry force (division-ready, brigade-type) to expand the point of entry; to provide reconnaissance and security, and to serve as the initial combat-capable maneuver force.

The RAS provides the regiment with combat aviation assets. It is organized with air cavalry troops equipped with eight OH-58D (Armed) helicopters each and a UH-60 Black Hawk assault helicopter troop. The squadron adds a very responsive, terrain-independent movement capability to the regiment. The maneuverability, firepower, and flexibility of the RAS enhance the combat flexibility of the regiment. The RAS may operate independently of, or in close coordination with, the ACS, or it may provide troops to the ACS.

A-5. CAVALRY SQUADRONS

a. Heavy division cavalry squadron. The heavy division cavalry squadron (Figure A-8) is a highly mobile, armor-protected force organized as part of the armored and mechanized infantry divisions. The squadron operates primarily in the environmental states of war and conflict. It may deploy into a theater by FAST sealift as part of a division, brigade, or joint task force. It consists of three M3/M1-equipped ground troops and two OH-58D-equipped air cavalry troops. The squadron can expect to perform reconnaissance and security operations in conditions characterized as fluid and continuous, mobile, wide ranging, and firepower intensive.

b. Light division cavalry squadron. The light division cavalry squadron (Figure A-9) is a high-mobility, lightly armed force organized as part of light infantry divisions. It consists of one high-mobility, multipurpose wheeled vehicle (HMMWV)-equipped ground troop and and two OH-58D (Armed) helicopter-equipped air cavalry troops. As part of the light infantry division, this squadron may operate in any environmental state from peace to war. The squadron is deployable by air or sealift to a theater of operations as part of the division, or in support of a brigade or joint task force. This squadron possesses a significant tactical mobility advantage over the infantry battalions in the division.

c. Air cavalry squadron. The air cavalry squadron is a highly mobile, armed force organized as part of airborne (Figure A-10) and air assault (Figure A-11) divisions. It is also organic to those corps without an assigned ACR. It is equipped predominantly with air cavalry troops, each containing eight OH-58D aircraft. Ground cavalry troops may be part of the squadron. When present, ground troops are mounted in HMMWVs. The squadron is structured light to possess the same strategic mobility as the parent division. When deployed, the squadron possesses a significant mobility advantage over infantry battalions of the division.



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