Military


Robins AFB
Warner Robins, GA
3238'N 8336'W

Robins Air Force Base is home of Georgia Air National Guard 116th Bomb Wing, flying the B-1B bomber, and is the main US operating base for the E-8 Joint STARS. Robins AFB is the largest industrial complex in Georgia, with $3,298,814,000 replacement value of facilities, 3.8 million square feet of maintenance shops, 3.5 million square feet of storage space, and 1.7 million square feet of administrative space. It is one of the largest Air Force bases in the South, with 13,801,313 total square feet of facilities situated on 8,722 acres. The base has the largest runway in Georgia --12,000 feet long by 300 feet wide with two 1,000-foot overruns. It employs more than 19,000 men and women, including more than 5,000 military members, almost 12,000 civilians, and more than 2,800 contract civilians. Already the largest industrial complex in Georgia, Robins Air Force Base is poised to become a megabase in the 21st century.

Robins AFB is situated on 8,800 acres of upper coastal plain, of which 2,250 acres are natural wetlands and 600 acres are mixed hardwood and pine forests. Wildlife and vegetation are diverse and abundant, ranging from the American alligator and water tupelo to the indigo bunting and longleaf pine. Artifacts, some dating back to 8,000 BC, recovered from 35 archeological sites indicate that Robins was once a major Native American settlement.

In April 1996, the Air National Guard's 116th Fighter Wing relocated to Robins where it was renamed the 116th Bomb Wing and flies the B-1B bomber. Part of the reason to move the Guard was simply the air space required. It wasn't possible to fly the B-1B at Dobbins Air Reserve Base (ARB), so when the unit converted from F-15s to the B-1B they had to find a new home. The Georgia Air National Guard (GAANG) B-1 base is a base-within-a-base, 134 acres of Robins AFB surrounded by a class B security fence. The master plan lays out buildings, streets, aprons, infrastructure, utilities, drainage, weapons storage areas, and future expansion. This includes horizontal construction -- roadways, hydrant fueling, apron, taxiway, a consolidated aircraft support system (which powers the plane for testing without running the engine), and laying utility lines.

In April 2000 the 116th Bomb Wing of the Georgia Air National Guard at Robins AFB opened new facilities valued at over $60 million. These improvements represent Phase I of a three-phase project valued at over $100-million for the middle Georgia Air Force Base. It also represents the largest facilities improvement contract in the history of the Air National Guard. Phase One improvements at the 116th Bomb Wing include a $5.8 million aircraft site beddown area, a $9.4 million Consolidated Aircraft Support System and Fuel Complex, and $8.8 million worth improvements to the aircraft parking apron and taxiway. A new double bay hangar, single-bay hangar and engine shop costing $20.9 million are among the largest hangar and maintenance facilities on the base. Other improvements to be opened are an Aircraft Ground Equipment and Munitions Trailer Maintenance area ($2.8 million), Operations Group and Security forces buildings ($5.3 million), a Munitions Maintenance shop ($.5 million), and a T-9 Engine Noise Suppressor ($1 million). The 116th Bomb Wing moved to Robins AFB in 1995 from Atlanta and since that time has occupied 33 temporary facilities throughout Robins Air Force Base. Phase II valued at more than $11.8 million will include a weapons release/load crew training facility and munitions maintenance and training area. Completion is anticipated in 2002. Phase III, yet unfunded, includes a new wing headquarters, communications flight and services flight facility, a vehicle maintenance and avionics Test station, and a supply and civil engineering complex.

In January 1996, Robins AFB became the main operating base in the US for the E-8C Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System aircraft (Joint STARS or J-STARS). The wing received its first aircraft March 22, 1996, and will receive one to three a year until there are 19 E-8Cs at Robins by 2006. Joint STARS construction began in December 1992 and continued through fiscal year 2000.

Nearly everyone in the town of Warner Robins either works on the base or is related to somebody who works there, which promotes warm relations with local city folks who rely on Robins AFB for a good part of their livelihood. A friendly population of more than 80,000 enhances the city 's fine location and environment. Warner Robins' warm, southern climate and two nearby lakes offer nearly year-round outdoor activity such as boating, fishing and water skiing. And the city is small enough so there's not a lot of crime, but it's big enough that you can get whatever you want in the stores.

One of the Air Force's five air logistics centers, Warner Robins Air Logistics Center has worldwide management and engineering responsibility for the repair, modification and overhaul of the: F-15 Eagle; C-130 Hercules; C-141 Starlifter; all Air Force helicopters; and all special operations aircraft and their avionics systems.

In addition, Warner Robins Air Logistics Center has worldwide management responsibility for the U-2 Dragon Lady, and is home of the 93rd Air Control Wing flying the E-8 Joint Stars

Robin's Museum of Aviation is a major center of education for Georgia. The second largest aviation museum in the USAF, it features 93 historic aircraft and missiles on a 43 acre site consisting of both indoor and outdoor exhibits. The Museum of Aviation is located only seven miles east of I-75, near Robins Air Force Base.

Today the Warner Robins ALC and Robins AFB is the state's largest industrial facility employing over 4,000 military and over 13,000 civilians employees. Robins is home to over 40 organizations including the Warner Robins ALC, Headquarters Air Force Reserve (HQ AFRES), the 19th Air Refueling Wing (19ARW) or "Black Knights", 5th Combat Communications Group (5CCG), 93rd Air Control Wing (93ACW) (Joint STARS), and the 116th Bomb Wing (116BW) of the Air National Guard (B-1B).

Throughout its existence the Center's mission and responsibility have always been the supply of parts for maintenance, repair, and storage of aircraft vital to the nation's defense. The major change in this mission has been in the enormity of its growth and its technical complexity.

In early 1941, the City of Macon and Bibb County floated $100,000 in bonds and purchased and donated 3,000 acres of land to the federal government. The gift of land to the government was to influence the Army Air Corps to establish a maintenance and supply depot in the area. During the defense buildup preceding World War II, the middle Georgia area was chosen for the maintenance/supply depot primarily because of its level land and abundant pure water. In World War II, the personnel at Robins AFB maintained various and numerous warplanes as well as train and dispatch over a quarter of a million maintenance, supply, and logistics field teams to every theater of war.

After World War II, the number of military and civilian employees dropped dramatically until in March 1946, it reached a total of only 3,900. However, the critical role that Robins AFB and its repair and supply personnel played in the Berlin Airlift (Operation Vittles) 1948-1949 caused the work force to grow to 11,000. This trend continued with the advent of the Korean War. Once again the nation took notice of the essential role of the Depot--the known as the Warner Robins Air Materiel Area (WRAMA). In one of their finest efforts, workers at the Center literally unwrapped and refurbished hundreds of "Cocooned" Boeing B-29 Superfortresses. Understaffed and working around the clock, they made sure that United Nations forces in the Far East had the necessary tools to fight the North Korean invaders. This was particularly true with the key role B-29s played in bombing Communist supply lines and staving off the enemy's assault on Allied forces pinned down inside the Pusan Perimeter.

The lesson of Korea was not lost on policymakers in Washington. Ever since, though numbers have fluctuated slightly, both the Air Force and Department of Defense have always ensured that Robins AFB has been adequately staffed. This, of course, has paid off since Robins AFB and the WR-ALC have played enormous parts in the Vietnam War through the resupply of troops and materiel known as the Southeast Asian Pipeline. Among the weapons systems managed by WRAMA personnel during the Vietnam War was the B-57 Canberra used for night raids along the Ho Chi Minh Trail. The AC-119K Gunship was modified entirely at Robins AFB in 1969. It proved to be the Allies' primary "truck killer" during the war. Also playing a vital part in war were the AC-130 Gunship, various helicopters, the C-141, the C-130, the C-123, and the C-124 cargo aircraft--all serviced and maintained at WRAMA.

In the 1970s, WRAMA and Robins AFB personnel once again found themselves on center of world's stage as they surged to resupply America's important Middle Eastern ally, Israel, in the 1973 Yom Kippur War. During Operation Nicklegrass dozens of C-141s managed by WRAMA provided the Israeli military with critical supplies to prevent defeat in its war with its Arab neighbors. In October 1983, WR-ALC-managed C-130s and gunships supported US ground forces during the invasion of the tiny Caribbean Island of Grenada.

In 1990-1991, Desert Shield and Desert Storm once again challenged the WR-ALC and Robins AFB work force to provide supplies, parts, repairs, and personnel to Coalition forces in the Persian Gulf wresting Kuwait from the clutches of Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein. Personnel at Robins and throughout the Air Force airlifted more supplies and aircraft to the Persian Gulf Theater of War in 14 weeks than the Allies had airlifted in 14 months to West Berlin during the Berlin Airlift. Of course, everyone is familiar with the vital roles that the F-15 Eagle and the E-8A (now E-8C) Joint STARS played in bringing the Iraqi Army to its knees.

In addition to its combat role, the WR-ALC today supports several of the most vital Air Force weapons systems, the F-15 Eagle, the C-141B Starlifter, the C-130 Hercules, Special Forces (SOF) gunships, the 93ACW's E-8C Joint STARS, the U-2 Aircraft, Air Force vehicles, numerous helicopters and many other key missile, avionics and aircraft systems. It is one of the most important avionics centers in the Air Force, the integral manager of several important Foreign Military Sales (FMS) programs, the Small Arms Center for the Air Force, and a major location for the military development of high technology and automated industry. Since 1958, Center personnel have managed programs for 30 to 77 countries worth between $200 million to $3 billion annually.

Robins AFB, Georgia, has been visited by numerous dignitaries, and people of international fame including: numerous US cabinet and sub-cabinet level officials such as current Secretary of Defense William Perry and current Air Force Secretary Dr. Sheila Widnall, several senior military officers from every branch of service such as current Air Force Chief of Staff General Ronald Fogleman, as well as Senator Sam Nunn (Dem-Georgia), Senator Paul Coverdell (Rep-Georgia), the late former first lady of China Madame Chiang Kai-shek, the late Egyptian President Anwar El-Sadat and his wife, the late Prime Minister of Israel Menachem Begin, then Vice President Dan Quayle, powerful Georgia Congressman Carl Vinson, and many many more. Three presidents have also visited Robins, specifically--Lyndon Baines Johnson, President and Mrs. Richard M. Nixon, and President and Mrs. James E. "Jimmy" Carter Jr., who housed Air Force One at Robins AFB during his presidency during trips to their home in Plains, Georiga..

One of the most important recent missions to originate from Robins AFB came about in 1994, when Senator Nunn, former President Carter, and former JCS Chair, Collin Powell, at the bidding of President Clinton, traveled to Haiti and averted a major crisis. There mission which began and ended at Robins not only avoided war between the US and the Haitian military junta, but helped bring peace and democracy to that beleaguered island nation.

As for Robins AFB, itself it has gone through many changes. It has been buffeted by a major tornado in 1953 and squeezed by growing pains throughout. Originally, Robins Field consisted of just over 3,000 acres valued at one million dollars. The original construction cost just over $20,000,000. Today Robins AFB is situated on 8,722 acres of an upper coastal plain, of which 2,300 acres are natural wetlands and 1,150 acres are timberland. Wildlife and vegetation are plentiful and lavish. Birds, alligators, the Florida Panther, and various insects make up the animal population, while magnolias, oaks, and loblolly pines (many planted during the New Deal programs of the 1930s) among the wide ranging species of vegetation. Center environmental personnel and professional archaeologists have uncovered 36 sites and recovered numerous artifacts for display in the Robins AFB Museum of Aviation "Windows to a Distant Past," thus proving that Robins was once a major Native American settlement.

There are 3.8 million square feet of maintenance shops, 1.7 million square feet of administrative space, and 3.5 million square feet of storage space at Robins AFB. The flightline runway is 12,000 feet long and 300 feet wide with two 1,000-foot overruns. It also has 13 miles of railroad tracks. It is not only the largest in Georgia, but capable of accommodating the largest aircraft in the world including the C-5B Galaxy and the NASA Space Shuttle piggybacked on a Boeing 747. Robins has dormitories for 1,415 single members as well as 1,396 family housing units. In addition, it has a 20-bed hospital, a large base chapel which serves the religious needs of Catholics, Protestants, and Jews, two fully accredited elementary schools, 180 acres of diversified recreational facilities, first class Officers', NCO and Airmens' Clubs, numerous restaurant facilities, a base theater, base exchange, base post office, airline ticket office and commissary. Replacement value for all Robins AFB land and facilities in 1996 is $3,102,909,000.

Of particular note is the Robins AFB Museum of Aviation which began in 1981 with a directive from the AFLC Commander, and when Dr. Richard W. Iobst, then Museum curator, obtained the photographic collections of Georgia World War I aviator Lt Guy O. Stone. The first buildings opened in 1984. Today the Museum is led by its director Elizabeth F. Garcia. It has four major display buildings on a 43-acre site and 90 aircraft spanning a century of flight. These include the SR-71 "Blackbird" the world-speed record holder, a U-2, P-40, P-47, P-51, B-25, B-29, B-52, and MiG-17. Major exhibits include: the Flying Tigers, China-Burma-India Hump Pilots, the 483rd Bomb Group (B-17s in WWII), "MiG Alley," the Korean War, "Windows to A Distant Past" featuring Native American artifacts found at RAFB, Starbase Robins, Brig Gen Robert L. Scott, Senator Sam Nunn and Famous Georgians, "America's Black Eagles: The Tuskegee Airmen and Beyond," as well as several simulators and interactive displays. The Museum of Aviation at Robins AFB has become, in two short decades, a major Georgia educational and historical resource with hundreds of thousands of people visiting each year.

Not only has Robins AFB and the WR-ALC been important to the Air Force, but its impact on the state and region has been dramatic. Only 512 of the 17,022 member Robins AFB work force come from outside the 25 counties of Middle Georgia. Between $200 million to $300 million in annual contract awards have been presented to Georgia businesses each year over the past two decades. Overall Robins AFB contractors have awarded between $2 billion and $3 billion in contracts each year during that same period. Robins AFB's total economic impact on Middle Georgia has ranged from $1 billion to $1.9 billion each year.

The sleepy little whistle-stop known as Wellston changed its name to Warner Robins on 1 September 1942. Since that time, it has grown to 49,200 citizens, while Houston County now has a population near 100,000. But Warner Robins hasn't been the only beneficiary of the Base's employment of over 17,000 military and civilian workers. Perry, Cochran, Fort Valley, Byron, Macon, Forsyth, Hawkinsville, Eastman, and the other regional towns of Middle Georgia's 25 counties have also grown in size and experienced economic stability as a result of the development of Robins AFB and its supporting collateral businesses and industries which have burgeoned since 1941.

In 1993 and again in 1995, Robins and the WR-ALC were closely scrutinized by members of the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Commission. On both occasions the BRAC commissioners agreed that this installation was so vital to the nation's defense that it should remain open and functioning as one of America's primary Air Logistics Centers. Finally, on 12 May 1995, all of the hard work put forth by the members of Team Robins Plus paid off. The Team reached the pinnacle of its profession when Center and Base personnel received the Commander-in-Chief's Installation Excellence Award from Secretary of the Air Force Widnall during formal ceremonies in Washington.

BRAC 2005

Secretary of Defense Recommendations: In its 2005 BRAC Recommendations, DoD recommended to close Naval Air Station Atlanta, GA. As a result, Robins AFB received several of NAS Atlanta's relocations. DoD would relocate Atlanta's aircraft and necessary personnel, equipment and support to several Air Stations, including Robins AFB. DoD claimed that with these recommendations, the aviation assets would be located closer to their theaterof operations and/or would result in increased maintenance efficiencies and operational synergies. There would be potential impacts to waste management. Environmentally, Robins Air Force Base was in Attainment. There would be potential impacts to cultural, archeological, tribal resources; land use constraints or sensitive resource areas; noise; waste management; water resources; and wetlands as a result of this recommendation.

DoD also recommended to realign Robins Air Force Base, GA. The 19th Air Refueling Group's KC- 135R aircraft would be distributed to the 22nd Air Refueling Wing, McConnell Air Force Base, KS (nine aircraft), and to backup aircraft inventory (three aircraft). The 202d Engineering Installation Squadron (ANG), a geographically separated unit at Middle Georgia Regional Airport, would be relocated into available space at Robins Air Force Base.

This recommendation would realign active duty KC-135R aircraft from Robins (18) to McConnell (15), a base higher in military value for the tanker mission and with available capacity to receive the additional aircraft at no cost. This consolidation would increase McConnell's active duty tanker squadrons to optimum size. This recommendation would also enable the Air National Guard to transfer its KC-135R aircraft based at McConnell to Forbes Field AGS, KS (35), retaining one of the higher-ranking air reserve component tanker bases. The vacated infrastructure and capacity resulting from the realignment of the tenant 19th Air Refueling Group would accommodate U.S. Navy aircraft realigning to Robins from Naval Air Station Atlanta. The Navy would pay any costs to reconfigure the AF facility for their use. By realigning geographically separated units onto Robins, the Air Force could use excess capacity and reduce leased facilities in the community. DoD claimed that this recommendation would not affect the blended active duty/Air National Guard Air Control Wing at Robins, which remains the major operational flying mission at Robins.

The total estimated one-time cost to the Department of Defense to implement this recommendation would be $6.7M. The net of all costs and savings to the Department during the implementation period would be a savings of $31.9M. Annual recurring savings after implementation would be $15.0M, with an immediate payback expected. The net present value of the cost and savings to the Department over 20 years would be a savings of $175.1M. Assuming no economic recovery, this recommendation could result in a maximum potential reduction of 795 jobs (471 direct jobs and 324 indirect jobs) over 2006-2011 period in the Warner Robins, GA, Metropolitan Statistical economic area (1.2 percent). Environmentally, there could be potential impacts to air quality; cultural, archeological, or tribal resources; land use constraints or sensitive resource areas; noise; waste management; water resources; and wetlands that may need to be considered during the implementation of this recommendation. Impacts of costs include $0.4M in costs for environmental compliance and waste management.

DoD would realign Robins Air Force Base, GA, by disestablishing storage and distribution functions for tires, packaged petroleum, oils, and lubricants, and compressed gases. This recommendation would achieve economies and efficiencies that would enhance the effectiveness of logistics support to forces as they transition to more joint and expeditionary operations. This recommendation would disestablish the wholesale supply, storage, and distribution functions for all tires; packaged petroleum, oils and lubricants; and compressed gases used by the Department of Defense, retaining only the supply contracting function for each commodity. The Department would privatize these functions and would rely on private industry for the performance of supply, storage, and distribution of these commodities. By doing so, the Department could divest itself of inventories and eliminate infrastructure and personnel associated with these functions. This recommendation would result in more responsive supply support to user organizations and would thus add to capabilities of the future force. The recommendation would provide improved support during mobilization and deployment, and the sustainment of forces when deployed worldwide. Privatization would enable the Department to take advantage of the latest technologies, expertise, and business practices, which translates to improved support to customers at less cost. It centralizes management of tires; packaged petroleum, oils, and lubricants; and compressed gases and eliminates unnecessary duplication of functions within the Department.

In another recommendation, DoD would realign Robins AFB and two other installations by relocating fixed wing related Air Platform Development and Acquisition to Wright Patterson AFB, OH. This recommendation would complete the consolidation of all Fixed Wing Air Platform RDAT&E, begun during the previous BRAC rounds, at two principal sites: Naval Air Station (NAS) Patuxent River, MD, and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (AFB), OH, while retaining several specialty sites. Research and Development & Acquisition would be performed at NAS Patuxent River and Wright-Patterson AFB. This recommendation included Research, Development & Acquisition and Test & Evaluation activities in Fixed Wing Air Platforms across the Navy and Air Force. The planned component moves would enhance synergy by consolidating to major sites, preserve healthy competition, leverage existing infrastructure, minimize environmental impact, and effect reasonable homeland security risk dispersal. The relocation of Fixed Wing Air Platform Research was previously accomplished in response to the S&T Reliance Agreements resulting in the consolidation at Wright Patterson AFB with the maritime related Fixed Wing Air Platform Research consolidated at NAS Patuxent River. This recommendation would consolidate Air Force Development & Acquisition functions currently resident at Logistic Centers (Hill AFB, Tinker AFB, and Robbins AFB) at Wright-Patterson AFB. These moves would increase efficiency by creating RD&A centers with all attendant support activity and a robust acquisition organization available to all Air Force Fixed Wing Air Platform D&A functions. Assuming no economic recovery, this recommendation could result in a maximum potential reduction of 67 jobs (41 direct jobs and 26 indirect jobs) over the 2006-2011 period in the Warner Robins, GA, Metropolitan Statistical Area (less than 0.1 percent).

DoD would also realign Warner-Robins Air Force Base, GA, by relocating activities in rotary wing air platform development and acquisition to Redstone Arsenal, AL. This Air Land Sea & Space (ALSS) recommendation would realign and consolidate activities that were primarily focused on Rotary Wing Air Platform activities in Development, Acquisition, Test and Evaluation (DAT&E). This action would creates the Joint Center for Rotary Wing Air Platform DAT&E at the Redstone Arsenal. The end state of this recommendation would build upon existing rotary wing air platform technical expertise and facilities in place at the two principal sites and provides focused support for future aviation technological advances in rotorcraft development. The planned component moves would enhance synergy by consolidating rotary wing work to major sites, preserving healthy competition, and leveraging climatic/geographic conditions and existing infrastructure, minimize environmental impact. These consolidations would co-locate aircraft and aircraft support systems with development and acquisition personnel to enhance efficiency and effectiveness of rotary wing air platform design and development activities. Assuming no economic recovery, this recommendation could result in a maximum potential reduction of 82 jobs (50 direct jobs and 32 indirect jobs) over the 2006-2011 period in the Warner Robins, GA, Metropolitan Statistical Area (0.1 percent).

Secretary of Defense Justification: The recommendation regarding NAS Atlanta reduces excess capacity while maintaining reserve forces in regions with favorable demographics. The aviation assets will be located closer to their theater of operations and/or will result in increased maintenance efficiencies and operational synergies. Relocating Reserve Intelligence Area 14 to Fort Gillem creates synergies with joint intelligence assets while maintaining the demographic base offered by the Atlanta area for this function. The Fleet Readiness Center portion of this recommendation realigns and merges depot and intermediate maintenance activities. It supports both DoD and Navy transformation goals by reducing the number of maintenance levels and streamlining the way maintenance is accomplished with associated significant cost reductions.

This recommendation realigns active-duty KC-135R aircraft from Robins (18) to McConnell (15), a base higher in military value for the tanker mission and with available capacity to receive the additional aircraft at no cost. This consolidation increases McConnell's active-duty tanker squadrons to optimum size. This recommendation also enables the Air National Guard to transfer its KC-135R aircraft based at McConnell to Forbes Field AGS, KS (35), retaining one of the higherranking air reserve component tanker bases. The vacated infrastructure and capacity resulting from the realignment of the tenant 19th Air Refueling Group will accommodate US Navy aircraft realigning to Robins from Naval Air Station Atlanta. The Navy will pay any costs to reconfigure the AF facility for their use. By realigning geographically separated units onto Robins, the Air Force can use excess capacity and reduce leased facilities in the community. This recommendation does not affect the blended active duty/Air National Guard Air Control Wing at Robins, which remains the major operational flying mission at Robins.

Community Concerns: There were no formal expressions from the community of Robins AFB regarding the realignment of NAS Atlanta.

The community had no specific concerns regarding departure of the KC-135 mission and supported DoD recommendations to relocate functions to Robins. It sought to rebut arguments from the Atlanta, GA, community alleging poor Reserve recruiting demographics around Robins AFB. In response, the Robins community argued its close proximity to Atlanta provides recruiting demographics virtually identical to Atlanta's. It also contended that because of extra capacity at Robins, it could absorb further flying missions without difficulty.

Commission Findings: The Commission found no reason to disagree with the recommendation of the Secretary of Defense. However, the original cost savings were overstated because of incorrect data submitted by Naval Air Station Atlanta. Consequently, the cost data was revised by the Department of Defense and recertified.

The Commission found that Robins AFB has ample capacity and conditions for current and future flying missions. The Commission also found that the Secretary of Defense's overall intent and concept of realigning active-duty KC-135s out of Robins AFB was acceptable.

Commission Recommendations: The Commission found the Secretary's recommendation consistent with the final selection criteria and the Force Structure Plan. Therefore, the Commission approves the recommendation of the Secretary concerning NAS Atlanta.

The Commission found that the Secretary of Defense deviated substantially from final selection criteria 1 and 3, as well as from the Force Structure Plan regarding the realignment of Robins AFB. Therefore, the Commission recommends the following:

Realign Robins Air Force Base, GA. Distribute the 19th Air Refueling Group's KC-135R/T aircraft to meet the PAA requirements established by the Base Closure and Realignment recommendations of the Secretary of Defense, as amended by the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission. The 202d Engineering Installation Squadron (ANG), a geographically separated unit at Middle Georgia Regional Airport, will be relocated into available space at Robins Air Force Base

The Commission found that this change and the recommendation as amended are consistent with the final selection criteria and the Force Structure Plan. The full text of this and all Commission recommendations can be found in Appendix Q of the BRAC Commission report.






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