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Camp Hovey

Camp Hovey covered nearly 4,000 acres less than a mile outside the city of Tongduchon. It was 41 miles from Seoul. The Camp's primary mission was to act in concert with the Republic of Korea to deter aggression, and, should deterence fail, to defend the ROK. The installation supported some 2000-2500 US military personnel and 5-400 civilians contracted to the Department of Defense, and an additional 100 personnel classified as "other." Its climate features included, on average, summers between 80 and 90 oF, winters between -5 and 30 oF, and 40-48" of rain during a rainy season between July and August.

Camp Hovey was one of the 42 camps north of Seoul authorized Hardship Duty Pay of $150 per month as of 1 January 2001. The Hardship Duty Pay is paid to troops who are permanently assigned to areas where it is authorized or who serve 30 consecutive days of temporary duty in those areas. Several factors are considered in determining whether a location qualified for the pay: climate, physical and social isolation, sanitation, disease, medical facilities, housing, food, recreational and community facilities, political violence, harassment and crime. The extra pay provides meaningful financial recognition to troops assigned in areas where living conditions are substantially below US standards.

Army Community Service was not available. The 2nd Infantry Division's 17 installations operated on a hub system that gave Division soldiers access to services not available on their installations. Camp Hovey was near Camp Casey, which offered many of the services not available on Camp Hovey. No Housing Office or Family Employment Assistance was provided at Camp Hoevy. However, an Education Center was provided. Family Quarters were not available. All but 76 of the Division's soldiers served one-year unaccompanied tours. All soldiers lived in on-post quarters.

With the creation of Installation Management Command (IMCOM) and the subordinate Installation Management Command Korea (IMCOM-K) in 2006 and subsequent reorganizations, Camp Casey became the headquarters for IMCOM's US Army Garrison Casey Enclave. The Enclave under the Land Partnership Plan approved in 2002, would include Camp Castle and Camp Hovey along with Camp Casey, as a single administrative unit.

Camp Hovey was named in honor of Master Sergeant Howard C. Hovey who distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action on 6 July 1953. According to unofficial records, Master Sergeant Hovey was born in St. Johnsbury, Vermont. He was a musician before joining the Army shortly before the start of World War II. During World War II he was attached as a rifleman to a unit of General George Patton's Third Army and helped liberate several German Concentration Camps toward the end of the war. He returned from the European Theater to the States and a tour of duty at Camp Drum (now Fort Drum) where he married the former Evelyn Seymour. They had 4 children: Dean, Meredith, Cathy and Melanie. Master Sergeant Hovey was assigned to A Company, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. He was killed in action during one of the final battles for "Pork Chop Hill" on 6 July 1953. Master Sergeant Hovey was 42 years old.

Master Sgt. Howard C. Hovey, Infantry, United States Army, a member of A Company, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in Action against an armed enemy of the United Nations in the vicinity of Sokkogae, Korea, on 6 July 1953. Sgt. Hovey and other members of the company were on duty in the company command post when their position was suddenly attacked by a vicious, numerically superior enemy force. With total disregard for his own life, Sergeant Hovey left the comparative safety of his bunker, moved into a nearby trench and directed a hail of fire at hostile troops, temporarily repulsing several attempts to overrun friendly positions.

Aware that the dangerous proximity of the determined, reinforced enemy posed an imminent threat to the defense of the entire post, Sergeant Hovey, arming himself with a carbine and hand grenades, moved from the cover of the trench, spotted the enemy advancing within about 50 yards of the post and charged the enemy, pouring crippling fire and throwing grenades at the assailants, inflicting numerous casualties and checking their advance. Although wounded by automatic weapons during the ensuing action, he continued firing until he was again critically wounded by a napalm grenade. Feeling that the lives of other members were still endangered, he grabbed another carbine and grenades and again left the bunker area, maintaining his stand and firing his weapon and throwing grenades until he was mortally wounded by a direct hit from another enemy grenade.

Central Post Information

Hospitals Available:

  • Civilian hospital available on the economy for emergency care

MWR Facilities Available:

  • Recreation Center
  • Library
  • Large Gymnasium
  • Small Gymnasium
  • Arts & Crafts
  • Swimming Pool
  • Outdoor Tennis/Basketball
  • Officer's Club
  • NCO/Enlisted Club

AAFES Facilities Available:

  • Post Exchange
  • Small Post Exchange
  • Burger Bar
  • Airline Ticket Office
  • Barber Shop
  • Taxi Stand
  • Shoppette
  • Tailor Shop
  • Mini-Mall

General Area Information

National Parks and Resorts: Tobong, Soyo and Surak Mountains are all in the area, as is the Songdu Resort. Also, there are many parks, resorts, historical sites and entertainment areas in Korea. Because of the country's size and excellent transortation system, all these sites are within a day's travel from anywhere in the Division area. On-post tour and travel offices, Morale, Welfare and Recreation offices, and the USO offer regular excursions.

Nearby Facilities and Places of Interest:

  • Hunting = None nearby. Hunting available at Cheju-Do (320 miles away).
  • Fishing = None nearby. Fishing at Inchon (65 miles away).
  • Skiing = None nearby. Travel to popular Mt. Sorak can be arranged through Tour & Travel.
  • Swimming and Boating = No boating.
  • Swimming pool available.




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