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3rd Battalion, 7th Field Artillery Regiment
"Never Broken"

The mission of the 3rd Battalion, 7th Field Artillery it to plan and coordinate fire support and deliver conventional field artillery fires in direct Support of 3rd Brigade Combat Team, or as directed, throughout the full range of military operations.

The 3rd Battalion, 7th Field Artillery Regiment was originally constituted on 1 July 1916 in the Regular Army as Battery C, 7th Field Artillery and organized on 15 July 1916 at Fort Sam Houston, Texas and was assigned 8 June 1917 to the First Expeditionary Division (later redesignated as 1st Division and again as the 1st Infantry Division) as part of the 7th Field Artillery.

Arriving in France with the 1st Division in 1917, the 7th Field Artillery fired the first American rounds of the First World War. The 7th Field Artillery participated in 7 campaigns of World War I, receiving 2 awards of the French Croix de Guerre with Palm. It was there that the 7th Field Artillery adopted the motto stated by General Pershing about the 1st Infantry Division, "...never broken through hardship or battle." The 7th Field Artillery remained in Germany after the armistice on occupation duty returning to the US in September 1919 to Camp Zachery Taylor, Kentucky.

After its return to the United States, the 7th Field Artillery Regiment moved to Fort Ethan Allen, Vermont as a 75mm towed-gun regiment. The 7th Field Artillery as a whole was inactivated on 1 December 1934 at Fort Ethan Allen, Vermont and again activated 1 May 1939 at Fort Ethan Allen, Vermont.

The unit was reorganized and redesignated on 1 October 1940 as Battery C, 7th Field Artillery Battalion. It was also reequipped with 105mm howitzers. The 7th Field Artillery participated in the amphibious assault landing in Algeria with the 1st Infantry Division on 8 November 1942. The 7th Field Artillery went on to see heavy action in Tunisia, Sicily, the landing at Omaha Beach on D-Day, the drive across France and campaigns in the Rhineland, the Ardennes and Germany. In World War II, the 7th Field Artillery received 2 additional awards of the French Croix de Guerre with Palm and the French and Belgian Fourrageres. After Germany's surrender the 7th Field Artillery remained on duty in Germany with the 1st Infantry Division until 1955 when it was reassigned to Fort Riley, Kansas.

The Unit served until 1957 when it was inactivated 15 February at Fort Riley, Kansas and relieved from assignment to the 1st Infantry Division. The unit was consolidated on 1 September 1958 with Battery C, 7th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Battalion (active) (originally organized in 1898), and the consolidated unit reorganized and redesignated as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 3rd Gun Battalion, 7th Field Artillery, with its organic elements constituted on 12 August 1958 and activated on 1 September 1958.

In November 1960 the unit was reorganized and redesignated as the 3rd Missile Battalion, 7th Field Artillery. Five years later it was redesignated 20 August 1965 as the 3rd Battalion, 7th Field Artillery.

It was again redesignated (less former Battery C, 7th Anti-aircraft Artillery Battalion) on 1 September 1971 as the 3rd Battalion, 7th Field Artillery, and inactivated in Germany. Former Battery C, 7th Anti-aircraft Artillery Battalion, was concurrently reorganized as the 3rd Battalion, 7th Air Defense Artillery and thereafter had a separate lineage).

In 1986 the unit was reactivated as 3rd Battalion, 7th Field Artillery at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii and assigned to the 25th Infantry Division (Light).

On 16 November 2005, as part of the Army's transformation towards a modular force, 3rd Battalion, 7th Field Artillery was inactivated and relieved from assignment to the 25th Infantry Division. As part of the modular transformation, various support assets that had previously been held at division level, but habitually attached to a division's brigades during operations, were made organic to those brigades. 3rd Battalion, 7th Field Artillery was subsequently reactivated and assigned to the reorganized and redesignated 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division. The 25th Infantry Division Artillery (DIVARTY) was also inactivated as part of the transformation.

On 5 August 2006, 3-7 Field Artillery deployed to the Province of Kirkuk, Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Not only did they conduct a traditional counter-fire mission, 3-7th Field Artillery also set themselves apart as a maneuver taskforce conducting Infantry type mission sets. The use of 3-7th Field Artillery as a maneuver asset instead of a Direct Support Field Artillery Battalion was a result of the implementation of the Counter Insurgency (COIN) doctrine in Iraq. The method of removing the insurgency and strengthening the government could not be done through heavy fires, but rather squad size elements and partnerships with specific spheres of influence.

On 15 October 2007, 3-7th Field Artillery returned from Iraq to Schofield Barracks Hawaii and was again awarded the Meritorious Unit Commendation. They spent the next year conducting a refit and training in preparation for their return to Northern Iraq.

On 16 October 2008, 3-7th Field Artillery deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom 09-11, being stationed in Salah Ad Din Province in Iraq. Operating out of Contingency Operating Base (COB) Speicher, they were responsible for over 4600 Square Kilometers in and around Tikrit, the provincial capital of Salah Ad Din. From October 2008 to October 2009, they broke from their traditional artillery role and supported the 3rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team as a maneuver element partnering with Iraqi Security Forces and the Iraqi Government to strengthen security and build civil capacity improving the quality of life for the people of the Tikrit Qada (District).

They returned to Schofield Barracks, Hawaii in October 2009 where they were awarded the Meritorious Unit Commendation. They unit then began conducting reset operations and training to prepare for future deployments in the Contemporary Operational Environment.




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