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Project 627 Kit
November class

Project 627 began with a 25 November 1952 requirement to develop a strategic attack submarine for firing a large nuclear tipped torpedo at coastal American cities. With the success of strategic missile programs, including submarine launched cruise missiles, Project 627 was re-oriented as an attack submarine. The first two units [K-3 & K-14 ] were built to the Project 627 design, with subsequent units built to the more combat-capable Project 627A specification. Unlike the first two submarines, these were fully combat capable, equipped with the combat system of the Project 641 Foxtrot class diesel-electric attack submarines. The steel hull was divided into nine compartments: 1 Torpedo room and accommodations 2 Accumulator, accommodations and mess; 3 Control room; 4 Auxiliary machinery and diesel generator; 5 Reactor compartment; 6 Turbine compartment; 7 Electro-technical and control center for reactor; 8 Auxiliary equipment; 9 Steering system, accommodations.

In 1968, a Soviet November class nuclear submarine surprised the US Navy by keeping pace with a high-speed [31-knot] task force led by the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier Enterprise. The next year, responding to the "November surprise", the US Navy initiated development of the new "Los Angeles class of fast attack boats.

Leninskiy Komsomol, the first Soviet nuclear powered submarine, was launched on 09 August 1957. The boat's nuclear reactors started for the first time on 04 July 1958, and on 17 July 1962, K-3 was the first Soviet submarine to reach the North Pole. Several units of this class suffered reactor accidents. The remaining Project 627 and 627A class submarines were decommissioned between 1988 and 1992. On 30 August 2003 nine crew members died when a nuclear submarine sank in the Barents Sea while being towed. The K-159 submarine was on its way to be stripped of its nuclear reactors when it began to sink during a storm yesterday. Rescuers saved one crewman and recovered two of the bodies. Defense Minister Sergei Ivanov said the submarine will be raised from the seabed "without fail." Ivanov suspended the captain who was in charge of towing the submarine and President Vladimir Putin said there will be a thorough investigation. The accident came three years after the nuclear submarine "Kursk" sank in the Barents Sea, killing all 118 on board. The "Kursk" had active reactors, but the K-159's nuclear reactors were shut down in 1989 when it was decommissioned.

One Project 645 ZhMT submarine was built. Commissioned on 30 October 1963, K-27 was a modified November-class SSN equipped with two VT-1 type liquid metal (lead-bismuth) cooled reactors. The steel hull was divided into seven compartments: 1 Torpedo room; 2 Accumulators and Living accommodation; 3 Control room; 4 Reactor compartment; 5 Turbo and diesel generators, cooling and auxiliary machinery; 6 Turbines; 7 Generator. It was modified to test the reactors that were intended for use on the high-speed Alfa-class submarines. During sea trials on 24 May 1968, a sudden and unexplained loss of reactor power occurred. Radioactive gases began to leak into the reactor compartment, and nine members of the crew died from radiation sickness. K-27 was never returned to service.

Nine crew members died 30 August 2003 when a nuclear submarine sank in the Barents Sea while being towed. The K-159 submarine was on its way to be stripped of its nuclear reactors when it began to sink during a storm. The submarine broke free from giant pontoons that were towing it to shore, to be dismantled. The K-159 was not filled with polysterol to improve floating opportunities, as it is done with military ships. Rescuers saved one crewman and recovered two of the bodies. Defense Minister Sergei Ivanov said the submarine will be raised from the seabed "without fail." Ivanov suspended the captain who was in charge of towing the submarine and President Vladimir Putin said there will be a thorough investigation. The accident came three years after the nuclear submarine "Kursk" sank in the Barents Sea, killing all 118 on board. The "Kursk" had active reactors, but the K-159's nuclear reactors were shut down in 1989 when it was decommissioned.

Russia's defense minister said human error was to blame for the sinking of the submarine K-159. He and other officials said a failure to follow instructions was a large part of what happened. On Defense Minister Sergey Ivanov's recommendation, on 11 September 2003 Russian President Vladimir Putin temporarily dismissed Northern Fleet Commander Admiral Gennadiy Suchkov in connection with the deaths of the crew of the K-159 submarine.

Admiral Suchkov faced a court trial, is accused of the accident with the K-159 sub. The chairman of the court Alexander Homyakov said 85 witnesses would be interrogated. However, court itself is a closed one. The MoD and the Ministry of Atomic Energy (MAE) could not decide between themselves who was the owner of the sub.



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