Military


Project 25A Kora Class

What immediately distinguishes INS Kora from its predecessors is the large weapon load of sixteen 3M-24 anti-ship missiles (Russian: Kh-35 Uran, NATO: SS-N-25 Switchblade) in four quadruple launchers.

INS Kirch is the second ship of the 'Kora' class of guided missile corvettes. This unique 1500-tonne corvette, embodying lethal cutting edge technology, has been designed in-house by the naval designers and outfitted by Mazagaon Docks Limited, Mumbai. With her formidable offensive arsenal of surface-to-surface missiles and guns, Kirch is a lethal fighting unit. She has anti-air shoulder-launched missiles, chaff launchers for decoy and close-in weapon system with a tremendous rate of fire for her self-defence. The weapon package is supported by state-of-the-art sensors and an electronics warfare suite. This compact fighting machine also has the ability to operate the force multiplier ALH and the Chetak helicopters. Her sleek lines and low radar cross section provides her with the capability to penetrate deep into the enemy lines to deliver a lethal blow.

INS Kora, an indigenously built corvette class ship of the Eastern Fleet, undertook a goodwill visit to Singapore in mid-2001. The Indian Naval ship participated in Republic of Singapore Navy Day celebrations followed by International Maritime Defence Exhibition (IMDEX) Asia 2001. The ship was open to visitors during the stay and had evoked vast public response. Over 6500 local population, a large number of international delegates and personnel of the participating ships from various countries visited the Indian warship and appreciated the weaponry and equipment onboard. The goodwill visit was aimed at fostering and strengthening the bonds of friendship with the foreign navies which converged in Singapore for the IMDEX.

The participation of INS Kora in the International Maritime Defence Exhibition was a showcase of the Indian shipbuilding industry and its indigenous efforts. This was the first time that so many warships and delegations from various countries including USA, Russia, UK, France, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, Thailand, Indonesia, South Korea, Pakistan and Bangladesh congregated at Singapore. The ships were berthed in the new and partially commissioned Changi naval base of Republic of Singapore Navy, situated near Changi international airport. INS Kora took part in Western Pacific nations multilateral harbour exercises conducted by Republic of Singapore Navy, involving tactical manoeuvres and search-and-rescue operations so as to promote mutual confidence and better understanding of procedures of the participating ships.

In late 2001 the INS Kulish, the third of the Kora class guided missile corvettes was, commissioned in Kolkata by Mr Viren J Shah, the Governor of West Bengal. The 1,500-ton warship is equipped with advanced sensors and improved electronic warfare system. With its multi- dimensional capability, the ship can scourge the oceans and maintain vigil independently. INS Kulish is based at Visakhapatnam under the operational control of the Flag Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Eastern Naval Command. It is commanded by Cdr P Ajit Kumar. INS Kulish derives its name from the mythological weapon of Lord Indra, meaning 'thunderbolt'.

INS Karmuk is the last of four missile corvettes-a result of Project 25A conceived and designed by the Indian Navy. This latest addition, built by M/s Garden Reach Shipbuilders and Engineers (GRSE) Ltd, Kolkata, was commissioned by Chief of the Army Staff, Gen NC Vij. The 91-meter ship is armed with long-range surface-to-surface missiles, super rapid gun, anti-aircraft guns, a potent sensor fit and the indigenous electronic warfare suite. She is powered by two diesel engines capable of propelling her to a top speed of 25 knots.

Karmuk is designed to operate in all environment across the spectrum of conflict. Being Indian in design with a considerable indigenous content, she will act as country's ambassador during overseas deployments showcasing India's shipbuilding and technological prowess. The ship is capable of operating helicopters for short periods, which gives her greater flexibility of operations. The ship is commanded by Cdr B Dasgupta, a Surface Warfare Officer and a specialist in navigation and direction. The ship has a crew of 10 officers and 106 sailors.

The commissioning ceremony was hosted by Vice Admiral OP Bansal, Foc-in-C, Eastern Naval Command and attended by Lt Gen JS Verma, GOC-in-C, Eastern Command, Vice Admiral, P Jaitly (INS), Chief of Material at Naval Headquarters, Rear Admiral R Paralikar (Retd), Chairman and Managing Director of GRSE Ltd and other military and civilian dignitaries.



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