Military

FM 3-21.21


FIELD MANUAL
NO. 3-21.21
HEADQUARTERS
DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
WASHINGTON, DC, 8 April 2003

 

FM 3-21.21

THE STRYKER BRIGADE COMBAT TEAM INFANTRY BATTALION

 

CONTENTS

COVER
CHANGE 1, 31 JULY 2003
PREFACE
CHAPTER 1. OVERVIEW OF THE SBCT INFANTRY BATTALION
Section I. Mission and Key Operational Capabilities
    1-1. Mission
    1-2. Mobility
    1-3. Dismounted Assault and the Close Fight
    1-4. Enhanced Information Superiority
    1-5. Lethality
    1-6. Force Protection and Survivability
    1-7. Force Effectiveness
    1-8. Unified Action
    1-9. Full-Spectrum Flexibility and Augmentation
Section II. Organization and Capabilities
    1-10. Battlefield Organization
    1-11. Capabilities and Limitations
    1-12. Organization and Functions
Section III. Battlefield Operating Systems
    1-13. Intelligence
    1-14. Maneuver
    1-15. Fires and Effects
    1-16. Mobility and Survivability
    1-17. Air Defense
    1-18. Combat Service Support
    1-19. Battle Command

CHAPTER 2. BATTLE COMMAND
Section I. The Art of Command
    2-1. Role of the Commander
    2-2. Mission Command
    2-3. Location of the Commander
    2-4. Combining the Art of Command and the Science of Control
Section II. Command and Control
    2-5. The Command and Control System
    2-6. INFOSYS Infrastructure
    2-7. Exercising Command and Control
    2-8. Distribution of Battalion Command and Control
Section III. Planning for Operations
    2-9. Information Systems Enhancement to Decision-Making
    2-10. The Military Decision-Making Process
    2-11. Roles of the Commander and Executive Officer
    2-12. The Role of Reconnaissance and Surveillance
Section IV. The Military Decision-Making Process
    2-13. Receipt of Mission
    2-14. Mission Analysis
    2-15. Course of Action Development
    2-16. Course of Action Analysis
    2-17. Course of Action Comparison
    2-18. Course of Action Approval
    2-19. Orders Production
  2-20. Decision-Making in a Time-Constrained Environment
Section V. Preparing for Operations
    2-21. Reconnaissance and Surveillance
    2-22. Security
    2-23. Force Protection
    2-24. Plan Revision and Refinement
    2-25. Coordination and Liaison
    2-26. Rehearsals
Section VI. Execution
    2-27. The Command and Control System During Execution
    2-28. Assessment During Execution
    2-29. Assessment
    2-30. Decisions
    2-31. Directing Action

CHAPTER 3. INTELLIGENCE, RECONNAISSANCE, AND SURVEILLANCE OPERATIONS
Section I. Overview of the ISR Function
    3-1. Definitions
    3-2. Fundamentals
Section II. ISR and the Decision-Making Process
    3-3. Intelligence Preparation of the Battlefield
    3-4. The Reconnaissance and Surveillance Matrix and Order
    3-5. Responsibilities
Section III. Integration with the SBCT's Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Assets
    3-6. The Cavalry Squadron (RSTA) and the Infantry Battalion Reconnaissance and Surveillance Assets
    3-7. Capabilities
    3-8. Digitization and Communications Architecture
    3-9. Executing the Reconnaissance and Surveillance Plan
Section IV. Supporting the Reconnaissance and Surveillance Plan
    3-10. Fire Support
    3-11. Logistics Support
    3-12. Medical
    3-13. Communications

CHAPTER 4. OFFENSIVE OPERATIONS
Section I. Fundamentals of Offensive Operations
    4-1. Characteristics of Offensive Operations
    4-2. Contact Continuum
    4-3. Organization of Offensive Operations
    4-4. Sequence of Offensive Operations
Section II. Forms of Maneuver
    4-5. Envelopment
    4-6. Penetration
    4-7. Turning Movement
    4-8. Infiltration
    4-9. Frontal Attack
    4-10. Movement Techniques and Formations
Section III. Forms of Tactical Offense
    4-11. Movement to Contact
    4-12. Organization of Movement to Contact
    4-13. Search and Attack Technique in Movement to Contact
    4-14. Integration of CS and CSS Elements in Movement to Contact
    4-15. Movement to Contact Planning Considerations
    4-16. Execution of Movement to Contact
    4-17. Attacks
    4-18. Characteristics of the Attack
    4-19. Force-Oriented Attack against a Stationary Enemy Force
    4-20. Force-Oriented Attack against a Moving Enemy Force
    4-21. Terrain-Oriented Attacks
    4-22. Exploitation
    4-23. Pursuit
    4-24. Special Purpose Attacks
Section IV. Offensive Planning Considerations
    4-25. Planning Considerations
    4-26. Force Organization
    4-27. Reconnaissance and Surveillance
    4-28. Scheme of Maneuver
    4-29. Fire Support
Section V. Transition Operations
    4-30. Consolidation
    4-31. Reorganization
    4-32. Continuing Operations
    4-33. Defend

CHAPTER 5. DEFENSIVE OPERATIONS
Section I. Fundamentals of the Defense
    5-1. Purpose of the Defense
    5-2. Organization of Defensive Actions
    5-3. Characteristics of the Defense
Section II. Types of Defensive Operations
    5-4. Area Defense
    5-5. Mobile Defense
    5-6. Retrograde Operations
    5-7. Delay
    5-8. Delay Organization
    5-9. Delay Planning Considerations
    5-10. Delay Scheme of Maneuver
    5-11. Maximizing the Use of Terrain in a Delay
    5-12. Forcing the Enemy to Deploy and Maneuver in a Delay
    5-13. Avoiding Decisive Engagement in a Delay
    5-14. Parameters of the Delay Order
    5-15. Alternate and Subsequent Positions in a Delay
    5-16. Fire Support in a Delay
    5-17. Engineer Support in a Delay
    5-18. Air Defense Support in a Delay
    5-19. Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Support in a Delay
    5-20. Combat Service Support in a Delay
    5-21. Delay Preparations
    5-22. Execution of a Delay
    5-23. Withdrawal
    5-24. Withdrawal Organization
    5-25. Withdrawal Planning Considerations
    5-26. Withdrawal Scheme of Maneuver
    5-27. Withdrawal Preparation
    5-28. Withdrawal Execution
    5-29. Concealing the Withdrawal
    5-30. Disengagement in a Withdrawal
    5-31. Actions on Contact in a Withdrawal
    5-32. Terminating the Withdrawal
    5-33. Retirement
Section III. Defensive Planning Considerations
    5-34. Defensive Planning Steps
    5-35. Intelligence Preparation of the Battlefield
    5-36. Course of Action Development
Section IV. Sequence of the Defense
    5-37. Occupation and Establishment of Security
    5-38. Preparation and Continued Security Operations
    5-39. Security Area Engagement
    5-40. Main Battle Area Engagement
    5-41. Follow-On Missions
    5-42. Rear Area
Section V. Techniques of Defense
    5-43. Defense of an Area of Operation
    5-44. Defense from a Battle Position
    5-45. Reverse Slope Defense
    5-46. Defense of a Strongpoint
    5-47. Perimeter Defense
    5-48. Reserve
    5-49. Counterattack
Section VI. Countermobility, Mobility, and Survivability Integration
    5-50. Countermobility
    5-51. Survivability

CHAPTER 6. URBAN OPERATIONS
Section I. Introduction
    6-1. Fundamentals of Urban Operations
    6-2. General Considerations of Urban Operations
    6-3. The SBCT Infantry Battalion's Role in Urban Operations
    6-4. Tactical Challenges
Section II. Mission, Enemy, Terrain and Weather, Troop and Support
Available, Time Available, and Civil Considerations (METT-TC)
    6-5. Mission
    6-6. Enemy
    6-7. Urban Mapping
    6-8. Terrain and Weather
    6-9. Troops and Support Available
    6-10. Time
    6-11. Civil Considerations
Section III. Controlling Operations
    6-12. Enemy Focus
    6-13. Commander's Critical Information Requirements
    6-14. Task-Organization of Units to Accomplish Specific Tasks
    6-15. Rehearsals
    6-16. Fire Support
    6-17. Field Artillery
    6-18. Mortars
    6-19. Communications
    6-20. Weapons Effects
Section IV. Offensive Operations
    6-21. Offensive Framework
    6-22 Types of Offensive Operations
    6-23. Cordon and Attack
    6-24. Transition
    6-25. Movement to Contact
    6-26. Infiltration
    6-27. Attack of a Village
    6-28. Nodal Attack
Section V. Defensive Operations
    6-29. Defensive Framework
    6-30. Defensive Planning
    6-31. Integrating the Urban Area into the Defense
    6-32. Nodal Defense
    6-33. Delay

CHAPTER 7. TACTICAL ENABLING OPERATIONS
Section I. Security Operations
    7-1. Purpose
    7-2. Forms of Security Operations
    7-3. Screen
    7-4. Guard
    7-5. Cover
    7-6. Area Security
    7-7. Local Security
    7-8. High-Value Assets Security
Section II. Relief Operations
    7-9. Planning Considerations
    7-10. Conducting the Relief
    7-11. Command and Control
Section III. Battle Handover and Passage of Lines
    7-12. Battle Handover
    7-13. Passage of Lines
    7-14. Forward Passage of Lines
    7-15. Rearward Passage of Lines
    7-16. Rehearsal
Section IV. Linkup Operations
    7-17. Control
    7-18. Forms of Linkup
Section V. River Crossing Operations
    7-19. General Considerations
    7-20. Assault of the Crossing Site
Section VI. Combined-Arms Breaching Operations
    7-21. Breaching Tenets
    7-22. Combined Arms Breach during Deliberate Operations
    7-23. Combined Arms Breach during Hasty Operations

CHAPTER 8. STABILITY OPERATIONS
Section I. Stability Operations
    8-1. Purpose
    8-2. Characteristics of Stability Operations
Section II. Types of Stability Operations
    8-3. Peace Operations
    8-4. Foreign Internal Defense
    8-5. Humanitarian and Civic Assistance
    8-6. Support to Insurgency
    8-7. Support to Counterinsurgency
    8-8. Security Assistance
    8-9. Support to Counterdrug Operations
    8-10. Combatting Terrorism
    8-11. Noncombatant Evacuation Operations
    8-12. Arms Control
    8-13. Show of Force
Section III. Planning Considerations
    8-14. Decentralized Operations
    8-15. Rules of Engagement
    8-16. Rules of Interaction
    8-17. Protection
    8-18. Sequence of Stability Operations Actions
    8-19. Task Organization
    8-20. Media Considerations
    8-21. Operations with Outside Agencies
Section IV. Specific Considerations by BOS
    8-22. Intelligence
    8-23. Maneuver
    8-24. Aviation Support
    8-25. Fire Support
    8-26. Mobility, Countermobility, and Survivability
    8-27. Air Defense
    8-28. Combat Service Support
    8-29. Command and Control
Section V. Techniques
    8-30. Presence Patrols
    8-31. Observation Posts
    8-32. Security of Officials
    8-33. Static Security Posts
    8-34. Searches
    8-35. Roadblocks and Other Checkpoints

CHAPTER 9. SUPPORT OPERATIONS
Section I. Characteristics of Support Operations
    9-1. Types of Support Operations
    9-2. The Army's Role in Support Operations
    9-3. Forms of Support Operations
Section II. Planning Considerations
    9-4. Considerations for Support Operations
    9-5. Planning Process
    9-6. Command and Control
    9-7. Maneuver
    9-8. Intelligence
    9-9. Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance
    9-10. Fire Support
    9-11. Mobility and Survivability
    9-12. Air Defense
    9-13. Combat Service Support
    9-14. Information Operations
    9-15. Other Planning Considerations
Section III. Pattern of Operations
    9-16. Response
    9-17. Recovery
    9-18. Restoration
Section IV. Sequence of Operations
    9-19. Movement into the Area of Operations
    9-20. Establishment of the Base of Operations
    9-21. Maintenance of Support
    9-22. Terminating Operations
    9-23. Transition to Combat
Section V. Training Considerations
    9-24. Training for Support Operations
    9-25. Basic Soldier Skills
    9-26. DSO- or FHA-Specific Training
    9-27. Additional Requirements

CHAPTER 10. COMBAT SUPPORT
Section I. Fires and Effects
    10-1. Organization and Equipment
    10-2. Planning Considerations
    10-3. Fires and Effects Planning
    10-4. Fires and Effects and the MDMP
    10-5. Mortars in the Battalion Close Fight
Section II. Close Air Support
    10-6. Missions
    10-7. Planning Considerations
    10-8. Air Force Support
    10-9. CAS Planning Duties and Responsibilities
    10-10. Suppression of Enemy Air Defense
    10-11. Weather
    10-12. Naval Surface Fire and Effects
    10-13. Army Aviation
Section III. Maneuver Support
    10-14. The SBCT Maneuver Support Cell
    10-15. Maneuver Battalion Planning for Maneuver Support
    10-16. Mobility
    10-17. Countermobility
    10-18. Survivability
    10-19. General Engineering
    10-20. Geospatial Engineering
    10-21. Stryker Brigade Engineer Company
    10-22. Mission
    10-23. Scatterable Mines
    10-24. SCATMINE Capabilities
    10-25. SCATMINE Limitations
    10-26. Scatterable Mine Delivery Systems
    10-27. Command and Control of SCATMINES
    10-28. SCATMINE Marking
    10-29. Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical
    10-30. Military Police Support
    10-31. Military Police Company Organization
    10-32. Employment and Planning Considerations
Section IV. Air Defense Support
    10-33. Mission
    10-34. Organizations
    10-35. Air Defense Planning Considerations
    10-36. Air Defense Officer Duties
    10-37. Offensive Considerations
    10-38. Defensive Considerations
    10-39. Air Defense Types
    10-40. Air Defense Warnings and Weapons Control Status
    10-41. Air Defense Assets
Section V. Signal
    10-42. Battalion S6 Section
    10-43. Communications Networks
    10-44. Communications Equipment
    10-45. Planning Considerations
Section VI. Intelligence
    10-46. Organization and Equipment
    10-47. Surveillance Troop
    10-48. Air Reconnaissance Platoon
    10-49. Multisensor Platoon

 

CHAPTER 11. COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
Section I. CSS Planning Considerations
    11-1. General Guidelines
    11-2. Battalion Responsibilities
    11-3. Predeployment Activities
Section II. Trains
    11-4. SBCT Infantry Battalion Trains
    11-5. SBCT Infantry Company Trains
    11-6. Positioning Trains
    11-7. Trains Security
    11-8. Communications
    11-9. Command and Control Systems
Section III. CSS in the SBCT
    11-10. Brigade Support Battalion
    11-11. S1 Section
    11-12. Brigade Operational Law Team
    11-13. Unit Ministry Team
    11-14. Financial Management
    11-15. Enemy Prisoners of War
Section IV. Supply and Transportation Operations
    11-16. Classes of Supply
    11-17. Routine Resupply
    11-18. Immediate Resupply
    11-19. Prestock Operations
    11-20. Supply and Transportation Considerations
Section V. Maintenance Operations
    11-21. SBCT Maintenance Concept
    11-22. Maintenance Requirements
    11-23. Company Role
    11-24. Battalion Role
    11-25. Destruction
Section VI. Health Service Support
    11-26. Preventive Medicine
    11-27. Soldiers Wounded in Action
    11-28. Battalion Medical Platoon
    11-29. Medical Communication for Combat Casualty Care
    11-30. Soldiers Killed in Action
Section VII. Reorganization and Weapons Replacement
    11-31. Replacements and Cross-Leveling of Personnel
    11-32. Personnel Replacement Procedures
    11-33. Replacement and Salvaging of Equipment
    11-34. Weapons System Replacement Operations
Section VIII. CSS from outside the SBCT
    11-35. Intermediate Staging Base
    11-36. Contracting and Host Nation Support
    11-37. Explosive Ordnance Disposal
    11-38. Field Services
    11-39. General Engineering Support

APPENDIX A. INTEGRATION OF SPECIAL OPERATIONS, MECHANIZED, AND LIGHT FORCES
APPENDIX B. COMMAND POST OPERATIONS
APPENDIX C. SNIPER EMPLOYMENT
APPENDIX D. DIGITAL DIVISION SUPPLEMENT
APPENDIX E. RISK MANAGEMENT AND FRATRICIDE AVOIDANCE
APPENDIX F. ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS ANDCOMPLIANCE
APPENDIX G. ROAD MARCHES AND ASSEMBLY AREAS
APPENDIX H. AVIATION SUPPORT OF GROUND OPERATIONS
APPENDIX I. AIR ASSAULT OPERATIONS
APPENDIX J. OPERATIONS IN NUCLEAR, BIOLOGICAL, AND CHEMICAL CONDITIONS
APPENDIX K. MEDIA CONSIDERATIONS
APPENDIX L. CONTINUOUS OPERATIONS
GLOSSARY
REFERENCES
AUTHENTICATION

 



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