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Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)


Strategic Missile Troops - Organization

The special-purpose brigade of the RVGK [Supreme High Command Reserve] was formed in 1946, and on 18 October 1947 the brigade conducted the first launch of the A-4 ballistic missile from the Kapustin Yar Range. Later the brigade was given the combined-arms designation of 22nd RVGK special-purpose brigade, then 72nd RVGK Engineer Brigade, and in 1960 the 24th Guards Division of the RVSN was formed on its basis.

In 1989, the 300,000 Soviet soldiers in the Strategic Rocket Forces were organized into six rocket armies comprised of three to five divisions, which contained regiments of ten missile launchers each. Each missile regiment had 400 soldiers in security, transportation, and maintenance units above ground. Officers manned launch stations and command posts underground.

In 1996, the SRF had about 100,000 troops, of which about half were conscripts. The SRF had the highest proportion of well-educated officers among the armed services. The numerical strength of its personnel is only 10 percent of the armed forces' total. As of 1997 the average troop strength was at 85.3 percent of the table of organization, and officers of all ranks were doing alert duty more frequently -- 130 24-hour periods a year. While 99 percent of RVSN officers have a degree in engineering, and over 25 percent of the personnel are contract sergeants and soldiers. However, among the conscript contingent more than a half of the total do not even have a secondary [high school] education.

As of mid-1997, two-thirds of the strategic forces' nuclear delivery systems were in constant combat readiness, and the readiness of the missile complexes to launch is a few tens of seconds. The organizational structure of the RSVN included four missile armies, which contain 19 divisions, 756 launchers, and 5,535 nuclear devices at stationary, railroad, and mobile missile launch complexes.

The control of the missile troops is effected directly by the Supreme Commander in Chief through the central command headquarters of the General Staff and the main headquarters of the RVSN, using a multi-level extended network of command posts operating in alert-duty mode. In the alert-duty forces about 12,000 missile personnel perform a three-fold mission: reacting to failures in the missile systems and systems of security communications, and correcting them in the minimum possible time; maintaining readiness to carry out the military mission assigned them; and in the event the armed forces are placed on the highest level of military readiness, to provide for the execution of their assigned missions.

A system to ensure nuclear security is based on a three-level system of protection of the launch installations. The installations are directly guarded by officers and warrant officers. The second line of protection is covered by armored hardware and structures. The third outer line is formed by minefields and security posts.

At the wing level there is a section called the 6th Directorate, consisting of three or four officers, and their sole function is to make sure they know where every nuclear weapon in that wing is. At the Rocket Army level there is a similar kind of organization. And at the Headquarters, Strategic Rocket Forces, there is a 6th Directorate that coordinates with the Ministry of Defense 12th Directorate, whose sole function is this accountability issue.

Missile Army

    Rezhitsa Guards Division, Vologoye[?]
      Missile Regiment [10 UR-100MR]
      Missile Regiment [10 UR-100MR]
      Missile Regiment [10 UR-100MR]
      Missile Regiment [10 UR-100MR]
      Missile Regiment [10 UR-100MR]
      Missile Regiment [10 UR-100MR]
      Missile Regiment [10 UR-100MR]
      Missile Regiment [10 UR-100MR]
      Missile Regiment [10 UR-100MR]
      Missile Regiment [10 UR-100MR]
      Missile Regiment [10 UR-100MR]

27th Rocket Army

    UI Missile Division,
      UI Missile Regiment, Kostroma [SS-24]
      UI Missile Regiment
    UI Missile Division,
      UI Missile Regiment
      UI Missile Regiment

43d Missile Army, Ukraine

    19th Missile Division
      Missile Regiment
      Missile Regiment
    46th Missile Division
      Missile Regiment
      Missile Regiment

UI Missile Army, Kirov

    UI Missile Division,
      UI Missile Regiment
      UI Missile Regiment
    UI Missile Division,
      UI Missile Regiment
      UI Missile Regiment

UI Missile Army, Khabarovsk

    UI Missile Division,
      UI Missile Regiment
      UI Missile Regiment
    UI Missile Division,
      UI Missile Regiment
      UI Missile Regiment

UI Missile Army, Vladimir

    UI Missile Division,
      UI Missile Regiment
      UI Missile Regiment
    UI Missile Division,
      UI Missile Regiment
      UI Missile Regiment



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Page last modified: 23-07-2013 17:32:38 ZULU