The Largest Security-Cleared Career Network for Defense and Intelligence Jobs - JOIN NOW

Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)

11 February 2002

U.S. Supports Universal Code Against Missile Proliferation

(France is leading efforts to take process forward) (480)
The United States supports efforts to establish a universal code of
conduct against missile proliferation, a State Department spokesman
said February 11.
"The draft International Code of Conduct Against Ballistic Missile
Proliferation is intended to create a widely-subscribed international
predisposition against ballistic missile proliferation," the spokesman
said. "It consists of a set of broad principles, general commitments,
and modest confidence-building measures. It is intended to be a
voluntary political commitment, not a treaty, and will be open to all
countries."
The United States participated in the meeting on universalization of
the draft Code of Conduct hosted by France in Paris February 7-8.
Following is the text of the spokesman's remarks:
(begin text)
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE
Office of the Spokesman
For Immediate Release
February 11, 2002
Taken Question for February 8, 2002 Daily Press Briefing
Draft International Code of Conduct Against Ballistic Missile
Proliferation (ICOC)
Question: Any comment on France's proposal to develop an International
Code of Conduct Against Missile Proliferation?
Answer:  We support this effort.
The United States was one of 78 countries that participated in the
meeting on universalization of the draft International Code of Conduct
Against Ballistic Missile Proliferation (ICOC) that was hosted by
France in Paris on February 7-8, 2002. We are pleased that so many
countries attended the meeting and provided views on this important
issue. We look forward to hearing from France on its plans for taking
the process forward.
The draft International Code of Conduct Against Ballistic Missile
Proliferation is intended to create a widely-subscribed international
predisposition against ballistic missile proliferation. It consists of
a set of broad principles, general commitments, and modest
confidence-building measures. It is intended to be a voluntary
political commitment, not a treaty, and will be open to all countries.
The draft Code also is intended to supplement, not supplant, the
important work of the Missile Technology Control Regime.
The United States was one of the initiators of the draft International
Code of Conduct Against Missile Proliferation, along with France and
the other Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) countries. The
Missile Technology Control Regime Partners began developing the draft
Code in 1999. At the September 2001 Ottawa Missile Technology Control
Regime Plenary, they concluded the work of the Missile Technology
Control Regime per se on the draft Code. Since then, France has taken
a leading role in developing the draft Code.
Like the other countries that attended the Paris meeting, the United
States welcomes the European Union's offer to hold a follow-up meeting
on the draft Code. However, we await word from France on its plans for
next steps on the draft Code.
(end text)
(Distributed by the Office of International Information Programs, U.S.
Department of State. Web site: http://usinfo.state.gov)
      



NEWSLETTER
Join the GlobalSecurity.org mailing list