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Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)

U.S. think tank urges help for Taiwan to defend itself

ROC Central News Agency

02/12/2021 02:46 PM

Taipei, Feb. 12 (CNA) The Joe Biden administration should make clear that Washington will not try to change Taiwan's status and work with its allies to plan against Chinese aggression and help Taiwan defend itself, scholars from a U.S. think tank said in a report released earlier this month.

"The U.S. strategic objective regarding Taiwan should be to preserve its political and economic autonomy, its dynamism as a free society and U.S.-allied deterrence, without triggering a Chinese attack on Taiwan," said Robert Blackwill and Philip Zelikow of the New York-headquartered Council on Foreign Relations.

As Taiwan "is becoming the most dangerous flashpoint in the world for a possible war involving the U.S., China and probably other major powers," the experts argued, the U.S. should focus on ways to prevent war over Taiwan.

Washington should also plan beforehand for any disruption and mobilization that could follow a wider conflict, but without assuming that such a war would or should escalate to China, Japan or the U.S., the experts said.

Further, they said they do not think it is politically or militarily realistic to count on a U.S. military defeat of Chinese assaults on Taiwan, without coordination with allies in the region.

It is also unrealistic to presume that after such a clash, the U.S. would or should simply escalate to some sort of wide-scale war against China with comprehensive blockades or strikes against targets on China, they continued.

The scholars therefore proposed that Washington should come up with a realistic strategic objective for Taiwan to sustain the political balance that has kept a balance across the Taiwan Strait for the last 50 years.

(By Lee Hsin-Yin)

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