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Tracking Number:  246676

Title:  "US, RoK Affirm Alliance, Will Watch N Korea Nuclear Program."

US-South Korea security meeting joint communique reaffirming the intention of both countries to sustain their security engagement and presence in Asia for the long term. (921008)

Date:  19921008

Text:
*EPF405 10/08/92 *

US, ROK AFFIRM ALLIANCE, WILL WATCH NKOREA NUCLEAR PROGRAM

(Text: U.S.-ROK security meeting joint communique) (2000)

Washington -- The United States and the Republic of Korea (ROK) concluded their 24th Security Consultative Meeting October 8 with a joint communique reaffirming the intention of the United States to sustain its security engagement and presence in Asia for the long term.

Both delegations pledged to continue to cooperate closely to assure that North Korea ceases all activities associated with development of a nuclear weapons program and expressed their serious concern that North Korea was using its compliance with IAEA inspections as an excuse to stall the mutual inspection regime mandated by the South-North Joint Declaration.

Following is the text of the communique: (begin text) 1. The Twenty-fourth Security Consultative Meeting (SCM) between the United States of America (U.S.) and the Republic of Korea (ROK) was held in Washington D.C., October 7 and 8, 1992. U.S. Secretary of Defense Richard B. Cheney and ROK Minister of National Defense Choi Sae Chang led their respective delegations, which included senior defense and foreign policy officials of both countries. Prior to this meeting, the chairmen of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Colin Powell and General Lee Pil Sup presided over the fourteenth U.S./ROK Military Committee Meeting (MCM) on October 7, 1992.

2. The two delegations carefully reviewed developments in the world and in Northeast Asia since the 23rd SCM, with emphasis on the Korean peninsula, and reaffirmed that the peace and stability of the Korean peninsula are central to the security of Northeast Asia, which in turn is vital to the security of the United States. Both sides shared the view that, despite worldwide trends of reconciliation and cooperation, there still exist destabilizing factors in Northeast Asia such as the North Korean nuclear program. In this connection, Secretary Cheney, noting enduring United States interests in the region, reaffirmed the intention of the United States to sustain its security engagement and presence in Asia for the long term.

3. The two sides noted that the period since the 23rd SCM saw several positive events in Korea that have the potential to contribute significantly to the resolution of the problems of the Korean peninsula. They agreed that the most important of these were the "Agreement on Reconciliation, Non-aggression and Exchanges and Cooperation between the South and the North," (South-North Basic Agreement) and the "Joint Declaration on the Denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula" (South-North Joint Declaration). Secretary Cheney reaffirmed the support of the United States for the full and prompt implementation of these accords, which will provide the foundation for peace and stability in Korea.

4. Both delegations pledged to continue to cooperate closely to assure that North Korea ceases all activities associated with development of a nuclear weapons program. Recalling President Roh Tae Woo's December 18, 1991 declaration that there were no nuclear weapons in the Republic of Korea, Secretary Cheney reiterated that the United States welcomed President Roh's statement, that United States policy was consistent with it, and that the United States was prepared to open its military facilities in the Republic of Korea for inspection in the context of an agreed effective bilateral nuclear inspection regime. They also shared the view that the decision by North Korea to sign and implement its IAEA full-scope safeguards agreement and to permit IAEA inspections of its nuclear facilities was a necessary and useful first step toward peace on the peninsula.

5. The two delegations, however, expressed their serious concern that North Korea was using its compliance with IAEA inspections as an excuse to stall the mutual inspection regime mandated by the South-North Joint Declaration. In view of remaining suspicions about North Korean nuclear development, Secretary Cheney and Minister Choi called on North Korea to implement promptly and fully its commitments under the Joint Declaration by agreeing to credible and effective bilateral inspections, including challenge inspections. They noted that these actions by North Korea would provide essential assurances that it does not intend to produce nuclear weapons and does not possess nuclear reprocessing or uranium enrichment facilities. Both sides also expressed concern that North Korea is continuing efforts to develop weapons of mass destruction and long-range missiles, and they assessed North Korea's ongoing buildup of offensive forces as destabilizing. They called on North Korea to cease these actions and thereby make an important contribution to peace and stability on the Korean peninsula. In addition, they called on North Korea to cease the export of such missiles.

6. Secretary Cheney reiterated the firm commitment of the U.S. to render prompt and effective assistance to repel any armed attack against the Republic of Korea in accordance with the U.S./ROK Mutual Defense Treaty of 1954. He emphasized the importance of close cooperation between the two countries in assuring the maintenance of an adequate combined deterrent capability and reaffirmed that the United States will continue to provide a nuclear umbrella for the Republic of Korea.

7. Secretary Cheney and Minister Choi expressed their satisfaction over the smooth implementation of Phase I of the East Asia Strategic Initiative (EASI). The two sides noted the reduction of U.S. forces in Korea, the appointment of an ROK general as the senior member of the Military Armistice Commission, the deactivation of the Combined Field Army, and the recent announcement of the appointment of a ROK general as Commander of the CFC's Ground Component Command. They agreed that such bilateral security actions as further reduction of U.S. forces in Korea and realignment of roles in the U.S./ROK combined defense system will be taken in a phased and flexible manner so as to simultaneously achieve the two objectives of maintenance of U.S./ROK combined deterrent capabilities and progress in South-North relations.

8. Both sides shared the understanding that U.S. forces should remain in Korea as long as the governments and people of the United States and the Republic of Korea believe that they provide deterrence against North Korea and serve the interests of peace and stability on the Korean peninsula. Both sides reconfirmed that any further drawdown of U.S. forces in Korea would be made only after the uncertainties surrounding the North Korean nuclear program have been thoroughly addressed. The delegations agreed that efforts to modernize U.S. forces in Korea and improve the conventional defense capabilities of the ROK discussed last year were progressing satisfactorily. Secretary Cheney affirmed that such efforts would continue in order to prevent any North Korean miscalculation. Minister Choi expressed his appreciation to the Secretary and pledged to make continued efforts to improve the combined deterrent posture on the Korean peninsula.

9. The delegations agreed that the U.S. transition to a supporting role in the defense of the ROK was progressing well and should continue. The two sides also agreed that armistice operational control over the ROK armed forces will be transferred to the Republic of Korea not later than 31 December, 1994. Secretary Cheney and Minister Choi directed the U.S./ROK Military Committee to report to the 25th SCM in 1993 its recommendations on implementing instructions and on specific timing for the transfer. Both sides also shared the view that U.S./ROK military combined exercises are necessary for the maintenance of the U.S./ROK combined defense posture and deterrence against North Korea. In the absence of meaningful improvement in South-North relations, especially on bilateral nuclear inspections, they agreed to continue preparations for the conduct of the 1993 Team Spirit Exercise.

10. Secretary Cheney and Minister Choi reviewed progress and discussed issues relating to the sharing of defense costs between the two countries for the combined defense of the Republic of Korea. Both sides agreed that the government of the Republic of Korea would provide $220 million to the U.S. forces in Korea in 1993. Secretary Cheney expressed his appreciation for the ROK Governments contribution to the maintenance of U.S. forces in Korea and its commitment to increase that contribution to the level of one-third of the won-based costs of stationing U.S. forces in Korea by 1995. Secretary Cheney and Minister Choi recognized that this program was another indication of the closeness of the U.S./ROK security relationship which they would continue to foster and strengthen.

11. Secretary Cheney and Minister Choi shared the view that the reunification of the Korean peninsula should be achieved in a peaceful manner. They expressed their hope that the South-North dialogue, which is the primary means of peacefully resolving the problems of the Korean peninsula, would continue and lead to peaceful unification, including through the implementation of tension reduction and concrete confidence-building measures. Secretary Cheney and Minister Choi agreed to make every effort to maintain security cooperation between the two countries in such a way as to contribute to the progress of South-North relations, and thus to the eventual reunification of the Korean peninsula, with a common recognition that its peaceful reunification will make a great contribution to the stability of Northeast Asia and the common interests of both the U.S. and the ROK. Both sides also shared the view that the Military Armistice Agreement of 1953 should remain valid until superseded by a peace mechanism based on direct negotiations between South and North Korea and also that substantive progress in arms control should be achieved through direct dialogue between the South and the North.

12. The two sides also affirmed that the 1990s would see continued evolution of the bilateral U.S.-ROK relationship from a security alliance to a more broadly-based political, economic, and security partnership, and that mutual respect and cooperation on bilateral, Korean, regional, and international matters will be the foundation of this partnership. Minister Choi and Secretary Cheney, looking ahead to the 21st century, agreed to maintain and enhance continually the U.S./ROK strategic partnership. To this end, they agreed that the Policy Review Subcommittee (PRS) would conduct a joint study to consider guidelines for and to define the elements of the long-term U.S./ROK security relationship, and report its findings to the 26th SCM in 1994.

13. Both delegations agreed that defense technological, industrial and logistics cooperation continues to be in the best interests of both nations and reaffirmed their dedication to further developing the existing cooperative system, through the U.S./ROK Defense Industrial Cooperation and Technological Cooperation subcommittees. They cited the visit of the U.S. Army technical cooperation team to Korea in April and the impending reciprocal visit by the ROK team as examples of the types of ongoing activities which can strengthen defense cooperation. The two delegations agreed to sign soon the amendment to the "Memorandum of Understanding on the Royalty Fees of U.S. Originated Defense Articles" which was concluded in July 1989. They also agreed to conclude under DTIC auspices the "Quality Assurance Agreement for Defense Articles" by the end of 1992. Recalling the Wartime Host Nation Support Agreement signed at the 23rd SCM In 1991, both sides expressed satisfaction that work is progressing on drafting the necessary technical arrangements to implement the Agreement, once it is ratified by the ROK National Assembly.

14. Secretary Cheney and Minister Choi agreed that this SCM was especially important for reinforcing the traditional U.S./ROK alliance in a rapidly changing international security situation and for setting the long-term course for future security cooperation for the common interests of the two countries in the Asia-Pacific region. Secretary Cheney and Minister Choi agreed to hold the next SCM at a mutually convenient time in 1993, in the Republic of Korea.

15. Minister Choi expressed his appreciation for the warm welcome and hospitality extended to him and his delegation by the U.S. and for the excellent arrangements which made this productive and successful meeting possible.

(end text) NNNN


File Identification:  10/08/92, EPF405
Product Name:  Wireless File
Product Code:  WF
Keywords:  KOREA (SOUTH)-US RELATIONS; SECURITY ARRANGEMENTS; KOREA (SOUTH)/Defense & Military; DEFENSE POLICY; INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY; KOREA (NORTH)-KOREA (SOUTH) RELATIONS; INSPECTIONS
Document Type:  TXT
Thematic Codes:  1EA; 1DE
Target Areas:  EA
PDQ Text Link:  246676
USIA Notes:  *92100805.EPF



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