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Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)

Pakistan, India to exchange list of nuclear installations

IRNA

Islamabad, Dec 31, IRNA -- Pakistan and India are to exchange the 
list of their nuclear installations on January 1 under an agreement 
that prohibits the two countries attacking each other`s nuclear 
installations, sources said here on Wednesday. 
The exchange of lists, covered under the agreement on the 
prohibition of attack against nuclear installations and facilities 
between Pakistan and India, would be carried out through diplomatic 
channels, simultaneously at New Delhi and Islamabad. 
Even at the height of tension some two years two years ago, both 
countries exchanged information on the nuclear installations and 
demonstrated their commitment against attacks on each other`s nuclear 
installations. 
According to the agreement on the exchange, signed on December 
31, 1988 and enforced on January 27, 1991, India and Pakistan have to 
inform each other on January 1 every year of the nuclear installations
and facilities to be covered by the agreement. 
The first such exchange of lists took place on January 1, 1992. 
This will be 14th consecutive year the two countries have 
exchanged the lists through diplomatic channels simultaneously in New 
Delhi and Islamabad. 
Under the agreement, the two countries have to inform each other 
on January 1 every year about their nuclear installations and 
facilities. 
The agreement came under severe test two years ago when the two 
countries were poised for a military show down following the attack on
the Parliament in December 2001. 
But despite the rising tensions the two countries complied with 
the agreement and exchanged the lists. 
The list usually includes civilian nuclear power plants and gives 
the exact location of each. 
Indian Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee will travel to Pakistan
to attend a three-day regional summit in Islamabad begins on January 
4. 
India and Pakistan have fought two of their three wars since 1947 
over Kashmir, which was divided between them after independence from 
British colonial rule in 1947. 
India and Pakistan tested nuclear weapons in 1998, but both have 
been cautious that there would be no chance their current dispute 
could escalate into a nuclear war. 
/TSH/AA/212 
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