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Iran Press TV

Libya's deputy intelligence chief abducted in Tripoli

Iran Press TV

Sun Nov 17, 2013 4:54PM GMT

Libya's deputy intelligence chief has been abducted from Tripoli airport amid worsening security situation across the North African country.

Senior Libyan officials say heavily-armed gunmen kidnapped the Libyan deputy intelligence chief Mustafa Nur in the capital city of Tripoli on Sunday.

'The vice president of intelligence was abducted shortly after his arrival in Tripoli from a trip abroad,' media outlets quoted a senior official as saying.

No group or person has yet claimed responsibility for the kidnapping.

Meanwhile, tension continues in Libya following the killing of nearly 50 people by militiamen on Friday. Militias from the city of Misrata have been held responsible for Friday's killings.

Residents of Tripoli have launched a general strike over the killings. The majority of Tripoli's businesses and schools are closed. An official has said the strike will last three days.

In the meantime, Libyan authorities have declared a 48-hour state of emergency to deal with the aftermath of violence.

Nearly two years after the fall of former dictator Muammar Gaddafi, in a popular revolution, Libya is still plagued by lawlessness and insecurity, with armed groups flexing their muscles.

Over the past few months, the capital city of Tripoli and its suburbs have been also hit by violent clashes between rival militias who participated in the 2011 uprising.

A powerful force in the increasingly lawless North African country, the militias have been rejecting calls from a weak central government to leave the capital.

The former rebels refuse to lay down their arms, despite efforts by the central government to impose law and order.

Many countries have closed their consulates in Libyan cities and some foreign airlines have stopped flying there.

JR/PR



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