The Largest Security-Cleared Career Network for Defense and Intelligence Jobs - JOIN NOW

Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)

Iran Press TV

Iran nuclear, defense know-how irreversible, impervious to assassination: Government spokesman

Iran Press TV

Tuesday, 01 December 2020 3:24 PM

The Iranian administration says the terrorist attack that killed prominent nuclear scientist Mohsen Fakhrizadeh was a psychological operation aimed at creating public disenchantment and confusion in Iran's strategy, stressing that the Islamic Republic's nuclear and defense know-how is irreversible and impervious to assassination.

"Definitely, terrorists will not achieve their objectives. Our nuclear and defense know-how cannot be assassinated, nor is it reversible," the administration's spokesman, Ali Rabiei, said at a weekly press briefing on Tuesday.

"Our people were not only not affected by the psychological dimensions of this assassination… but they became even more vigilant and more united in [safeguarding] national interests and in the face of their real enemies," he added.

Fakhrizadeh, the head of the Iranian Defense Ministry's Organization of Defensive Innovation and Research, was targeted in a multi-pronged terrorist attack by a number of assailants in a small city near Tehran on Friday.

Rabiei further said among the multiple objectives of Fakhrizadeh's assassination were disrupting peace of mind in the society, disappointing people from achieving victory in countering America's so-called maximum pressure policy, creating confusion in Iran's strategy in order to force the country to play in the enemy's court, and disrupting regional security.

Rabiei added that the terrorist act also aimed to disrupt international security with regard to possible upcoming changes, which would create an opportunity for the Iranian nation to restore its rights.

"Terrorists are aware of their fundamental weakness and know that they cannot put the brakes on Iran's scientific progress," he said.

The spokesman emphasized that terrorists carried out such a despicable act since they were not able to resist against Iran's determination and stop the country from playing an effective role in ensuring peace and security and pursuing peaceful nuclear technology.

He said Iran reserves the right to give a firm response to the assassination of its nuclear scientist.

Iran's Intelligence Minister Mahmoud Alavi said on Monday that the country's security forces had succeeded in finding many clues by fully investigating all aspects of the terror attack.

Iranian government officials and military commanders have hinted that the Israeli regime was behind the terror attack, vowing harsh revenge against all the criminals involved.

An informed source told Press TV on Monday that the remains of the weapon used in the Friday assassination show that it was made in Israel, adding that the weapon collected from the site of the terrorist act bears the logo and specifications of the Israeli military industry.



NEWSLETTER
Join the GlobalSecurity.org mailing list


One Billion Americans: The Case for Thinking Bigger - by Matthew Yglesias