The Largest Security-Cleared Career Network for Defense and Intelligence Jobs - JOIN NOW

Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)

Iran Press TV

UK, US have 'special relationship' in dealing with Iran, but just one stands 'by the nuclear deal'

Iran Press TV

Wed Jun 5, 2019 01:58AM

The United Kingdom and United States have a "special relationship" in dealing with Iran, says British Prime Minister Theresa May alongside US President Donald Trump, yet noting that London intends to "stand by the nuclear deal" unlike Washington.

"We can also differ sometimes on how to confront the challenges we face," May said Tuesday amid Trump's ongoing visit to Britain.

The US president, who has withdrawn America from the UK-backed Iran nuclear deal, also claimed that he sought preventing Tehran from developing nuclear weapons, something Iran has time and again said it does not want as corroborated many times by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

"Among the pressing threats facing our nations is the development and spread of nuclear weapons -- perhaps that's our biggest threat," Trump said at a joint press conference with May following a meeting at her Downing Street residence. "The United States and United Kingdom are determined to ensure that Iran never develops nuclear weapons and stops supporting and engaging in terrorism… And I believe that will happen."

Apart from other achievements, the Iran nuclear deal also known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action assured the West that Iran has never been pursuing nukes and its nuclear activities remain solely peaceful to this day.

Trump made the comments amid the US heightening of tensions with Iran in the Middle East.

After pulling the US out of the JCPOA, the US president re-imposed illegal sanctions, stepped up his anti-Iran rhetoric along with American military buildup in the Persian Gulf.

Tehran has asserted that it does not seek war, yet stands ready to defend its interests in the region in the face of US aggression.



NEWSLETTER
Join the GlobalSecurity.org mailing list


One Billion Americans: The Case for Thinking Bigger - by Matthew Yglesias