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Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)

Spokesman: Military equipment not first priority

IRNA - Islamic Republic News Agency

Tehran, May 29, IRNA -- Foreign Ministry Spokesman Bahram Qasemi said here on Monday in his press conference that Saudi Arabia thinks it needs support of trans-regional powers and thinks it may buy security with weapons and money.

The foreign ministry spokesman was replying to a question asked by a reporter that what is the aim of Saudi Arabia for convening a multi-billion-dollar contract to buy facilities from the US and what is the US strategy in this regard.

Qasemi reminded that a touchstone to sell weapons for the US government is to earn money, as the US president stated that 'we sold billions of dollars weapons so the US youngsters may find job'.

Thousands of people should die, so several youngsters could find job, such interpretation create a hard and dangerous situation, which might create wrong conception for some people that they can achieve their goals by using weapons.

History had proved that military equipment does not make priority and its clear pattern is Saudi Arabia war against Yemen, which over the past two years by bombardments and massacre of people still there is no success for them.

A reporter asked by re-election of President Rouhani whether diplomacy system of the country and foreign policy stances will face changes and whether there is any special program in agenda, Qasemi answered that programs, which started from the 11th government will be continued in the 12th government and incomplete programs should be completed through hard work while more priority will be givern to the neighboring states.

He said there is still time for establishment of the 12th government and colleagues in different committees are compiling regional strategies, which will be proposed to the government for approval.

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