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People's Daily Online

DPRK says leaving its door open to U.S. visitors

People's Daily Online

(Xinhua) 16:42, August 04, 2017

The Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) on Friday slammed the United States for issuing a travel ban on the country, adding that U.S. visitors "of good will" are welcome to the country, state-run media reported.

"Regardless of any government's policy towards the DPRK, we encourage various forms of exchanges and contacts including visits by people from all over the world," a Foreign Ministry spokesman was quoted by the Korean Central News Agency as saying.

"We will always leave our door wide open to any U.S. citizen who would like to visit our country out of good will and to see the realities with their own eyes," he said.

The spokesman stressed that the DPRK is safe enough for foreign visitors where foreigners will feel no threat at all because of its "stable and strong state system."

As for a few U.S citizens punished for their hostile acts against the DPRK, the spokesman said "there is no country in the world that will ignore the foreigners who committed hostile acts within its territory." He added that "it is a legitimate right of a sovereign state to punish criminals as required by law."

The spokesman also slammed the travel ban as a "childish" and "vile" measure to limit the people-to-to people contact. He said its purpose is to prevent U.S. citizens from seeing "the true picture of the DPRK that has achieved victory after victory."

"It is also a reflection of the U.S. administration's perception which regards the DPRK as an enemy," said the spokesman.

The spokesman called on the Donald Trump administration to abandon its hostile policy towards the DPRK.

On Aug. 2, the U.S. Department of State announced a travel to the DPRK, which will come into effect next month.



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