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Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)

DPRK FM Spokesman Rejects UN Security Council's Press Release

Korean Central News Agency of DPRK via Korea News Service (KNS)

Pyongyang, September 7 (KCNA) -- A spokesman for the Foreign Ministry of the DPRK gave the following answer to the question raised by KCNA Wednesday as regards the fact that the UN Security Council took issue with the DPRK's routine ballistic rocket launch exercise:

At the UN Security Council on September 6 the U.S. and its followers cooked up a press release again in which they found fault with the DPRK's measure for bolstering up nuclear deterrence for self-defence.

The DPRK categorically rejects this as an intolerable act of encroaching upon its dignity, right to existence, sovereignty and right to self-defence.

The recent ballistic rocket launch exercise of the Korean People's Army was successfully conducted without giving any negative impact to the security of the countries around the DPRK and the international waters as before.

The UN Security Council is not uttering a word about the brigandish act of the U.S. which is conducting nuclear war exercises for aggression after introducing huge nuclear war means including strategic assets into the Korean peninsula but is taking issue with the DPRK's legitimate measure for self-defence. This is utterly illogical.

The more viciously the UN Security Council finds fault with the DPRK's legitimate measures for self-defence by siding with the U.S., arch criminal harassing peace and security on the Korean peninsula, the more glaringly it will reveal its true colors as an unfair good-for-nothing entity before the international community.

The DPRK will continue to expand the signal successes of bolstering up the nuclear force in a phased way in this historic year when it started with the solemn blast of the first H-bomb test of Juche Korea. -0-



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