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Sea-Based X-band (SBX) Radar Contract Activity

Raytheon is a leader in developing technologies for missile defense. National Missile Defense refers to defense of the United States against limited missile attack. The RSC-developed ground-based radar-prototype, an X-band, phased-array fire control radar, is intended to be a building block in the development of the radar needed for National Missile Defense. The X-Band Radar (XBR), which Raytheon is under contract to develop, will be integrated with space-based sensors for a total sensor solution against limited missile attack.

Harris is providing The Boeing Company with systems engineering, integration services, and satellite communications equipment for the US Missile Defense Agency's (MDA) Sea-Based X-band (SBX) Radar program.

The Sea Launch partnership between Boeing of the USA, Energia of Russia,Yuzhnoye of Ukraine and Kværner, employs the technology and experience of Moss Maritime to penetrate new frontiers in the usage of dynamically positioned semi-submersible offshore platforms. Kvaerner had used the Vyborgsky Shipyard to build the Odyssey launch platform, which is the Launch Platform (LP), a semi-submersible vessel which is one of the world's largest ocean-going launch platform. The Launch Platform - or LP - a former North Sea oil drilling platform, was refurbished at the Rosenberg Shipyard in Stavanger, Norway. The vessel is one of the largest semi-submersible, self-propelled vessels in the world at 436 feet long, about 220 wide, with an empty draft displacement of 30,000 tons, and a submerged draft displacement of 50,600 tons.

In late 2001 Vyborg Shipyard in Russia launched a $45 million multi-purpose semi-submersible drilling platform for Moss Maritime in Norway. The platform is a CS-50 design and will be called Moss Sirius. Keel laying ceremony was held in January 2001, pontoons were launched in October 2001, delivery scheduled in mid May 2002. The price tag for a fully equipped CS-50 semi-submersible platform is about $250 million. CS-50 is the first semi-submersible drilling platform being built in Russia after 10 years. The previous semi-submersible platform "Shelf-10" had been constructed as long as Soviet times.

Under the $35 million deal, the St. Petersburg shipyard built the platform's flotation components by mid-2002. The platform was constructed in full conformity with the production schedule and the terms and provisions of the contract, and delivered in early May 2001. Vyborg Shipyard, a member of the AKO BARSS group, is fabricating modules for Finnish yards but its primary skill is in the offshore sector - partly through previous connections to the Kvaerner empire (it was for a short time a member of that group). Not only has this yard built six Shelf-type drilling platforms for domestic operation together with two jack-up units but in 2000 the company won an order to construct the bare-deck platform Moss Sirius, which was delivered during May 2002, on time and to budget, to the Norwegian investment company Moss Arctic Production.

On 04 June 2002 the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) modified, on a sole source basis, Contract HQ0006-01-C-0001 with The Boeing Company, to develop a Sea-Based Test X-band Radar (XBR) capability in support of the Ground-Based Midcourse Defense (GMD) Program. This action provided for the Sea-Based Test XBR capability design, development, acquisition of a sea-based platform, and modification of the platform and existing XBR to meet design requirements, integration and operational check-out, and radar test operations. Currently, Boeing is providing development of initial components of the GMD system (interceptor, XBR, and upgrades to the Early Warning Radars) under this contract. The effort necessary to satisfy this Sea-Based Test XBR capability is highly specialized and tightly interwoven with the on-going GMD development efforts being provided by Boeing. No other source can meet this requirement without the intimate knowledge of, and the ability to provide the currently planned XBR element for installation on the sea-based platform and integration into the GMD system under this contract.

On 21 November 2002 the Boeing Co., Anaheim, Calif., was awarded a cost-plus-award-fee modification to contract HQ0006-01-C-0001 in the amount of $30,000,000 for acquisition of long-lead items associated with the radar, as well as associated labor costs. The Boeing Co. will continue to develop a Test X-Band Radar (XBR) capability in support of the Ground-Based Midcourse Defense Program as a multi-phased acquisition. Subject to completion of environmental analysis, this modification is necessary to ensure that a Test XBR is ready to be integrated into the Ballistic Missile Defense System Test Bed in the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2005. Raytheon Electronic Systems, a major subcontractor, in Bedford, Mass., will primarily perform the effort. Phase one of the Sea-Based Test XBR effort was awarded during the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2002.

On 27 January 2003 the Boeing Co., Anaheim, Calif., was awarded a cost-plus-award-fee modification to contract HQ0006-01-C-0001 in the amount of $747,540,194 for completion of the development of Sea-Based Test X-Band Radar (SBX) capability. The Boeing Co. will continue to develop a Test X-Band Radar (XBR) capability in support of the Ground-Based Midcourse Defense Program as a multi-phased acquisition. This modification is necessary to ensure that a Test XBR is ready to be integrated into the Ballistic Missile Defense System Test Bed in the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2005. Raytheon Electronic Systems, a major subcontractor, in Bedford, Mass., will primarily perform the effort. Phase one of the SBX effort was awarded during the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2002, and an effort was announced in November 2002 for acquisition of radar long-lead items and associated labor costs.

The platform arrived at the Amfels shipyard in Brownsville in June 2003. The SBX underwent work at Kiewit Offshore Services on the north shore of Corpus Christi Bay. The contract for platform modifications at Amfels is worth between $80 million and $100 million.

The Missile Defense Agency (MDA) announced 15 August 2003 that it had selected Adak, Alaska, as the Primary Support Base (PSB) for the Sea-Based X-Band (SBX) radar. The PSB includes a mooring site and minimum logistics support for the SBX. Besides Adak, five other locations were considered: Naval Base Ventura County, Calif.; Naval Station Everett, Wash.; Reagan Test Site, Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands; Port of Valdez, Alaska and Naval Station Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The selection of Adak was the result of extensive analysis of numerous factors relating to operations, support and sustainability, including easy access to potential operating areas and available support infrastructure.

On 17 September 2003 Harris Corporation announced that it was awarded a $7.7 million contract by The Boeing Company to provide systems engineering, integration services, and satellite communications equipment for the Sea-Based X-band (SBX) Radar program. Continuous communications between the platform and shore facilities will be provided via a commercial C-band satellite, using a unique redundant dual-antenna system designed and furnished by Harris Maritime Communication Services (MCS) subsidiary. Harris MCS provides satellite communications services to cruise ships, remote land-based locations around the world, and to data collection sites thousands of meters below the ocean's surface.




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