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Project 667AK "Akson-1" Yankee-Pod
Project 09780 "Akson-2" Yankee Big Nose

After SALT agreements most submarines were modernized. As well as the Yankee Notch SSN and inactive Yankee SSGN conversions, two other hulls have been converted for research and development roles. The Yankee SSAN (Kazan) formerly known as the Yankee Pod was used for sonar trials (Project Akson-1) from 1983. The prototype Pod towed array was fitted at the stern in 1984 but after refit in 1993-94 the submarine emerged in 1995 without the Pod but with a bulbous bow sonar (Project Akson-2) which seemed likely to be the prototype for the Severodvinsk (Project 885).

Projects 667AK "Akson-1" Yankee-Pod and 09780 "Akson-2" Yankee-Pod were submarines for new sonar suites and data processing eqiupment testing, they also had no armament. As well as the Yankee Notch SSN and inactive Yankee SSGN conversions, two other hulls have been converted for research and development roles. The Yankee SSAN (Kazan) formerly known as the Yankee Pod was used for sonar trials (Project Akson-1) from 1983.

403-Kazan (manufacturer's number 450 is a Soviet and Russian 2nd generation submarine, and the first nuclear submarine, bearing the name of the capital Tatarstan. The name Kazan was subsequently awarded the construction of submarine project project 885 "Ash". Originally built between 1969-1971 as a 667 "Yankee class submarine, it was converted and used for testing of the new generations of APL hydroacoustic systems. In 1983 project 667AK "Axon-1 was completed for SJSC for 3rd generation APL, and in 1996 Project 09780 Axon-2 - for the 4th generation.

The new Irtysh-Amfora massive spherical bow array was first tested on Akson-2. The Irtysh-Amfora bow sonar array was expected to resemble the array of the US BQQ-2, in which a spherical active/passive array is flanked by passive receiving hydrophone arrays, but a drawing of the ship published in 1996 showed a standard Russian-style cylindrical bow array (the system dubbed Skat-3) with the torpedo tubes above it. Resource constraints may have forced Russia to abandon the more complex spherical array, which is installed in Yankee Big-Nose trials submarine Kazan (KS-403). Locating a spherical sonar array at the bow requires the torpedo tubes to be relocated further aft, angled outboard, as in U.S. submarine designs since the late 1950s; if the design has been altered to employ a cylindrical array, however, then the tubes will likely have been relocated at the bow.

The Yankee SSAN was based in the Northern Fleet at Yagri Island, and as of 2005 was expected to decommission soon. Disposal of the submarine was conducted at the Zvezda ["Asterisk" or Star] shipyard. In April 2009 the submarine unloaded spent nuclear fuel and prepared for shipment to Mayak Snezhinsk. On 6 October 2009 at 17: 35 CET the disassembly of sonar set using gas cutting ignited insulation materials. Due to the high volume of combustible insulation materials on pockets of fire was broke out at 23:30. Cabin boats arrived in Kazan and was established as a Memorial. The secion length is 22 metres, height of 6 meters, width 3.5 m, weight approximately 70 tons. In addition to the the cockpit, a section equipped with torpedoes was taken out and stationed in Zelenopodolsk.



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