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Vatican Satellite Imagery

For more Public Eye satellite imagery, see the Picture of the Week Gallery of satellite and other imagery of places in the news.
For more Public Eye satellite imagery, see the Picture of the Week Gallery of satellite and other imagery of places in the news.

Click on the small image to view a larger version






(Source: LandSat 7 - 03-Aug-01)
History permeates every corner of the magnificent city of Rome, famed as the Eternal City. Situated on seven hills along the Tiber River in central Italy-the site of settlements dating from 1500 BC-ancient Rome arose as a republic and a significant world force in the 6th century BC. The empire reached its zenith during the early 2nd century AD. The urban population swelled, aqueducts brought fresh water to the city, and a succession of emperors built splendid temples, forums, and other landmarks, including the Colosseum. After centuries of decline, the legendary city regained its cultural dominance during the Renaissance. Designated the capital of a united Italy in 1871, Rome has experienced expansion ever since. The sprawling, outlying districts of metropolitan Rome, encompassed by the Grande Raccorda Anulare motorway, dressed in contemporary architecture, present a striking contrast to the monuments of antiquity in the heart of the city. Although many international agencies are headquartered in Rome, its economy is largely dependent on tourism and government services. Rome retains its grandeur and reputation as one of the great cultural centers of the world.

This one-meter resolution satellite image was collected by Space Imaging's IKONOS satellite on May 5, 2003. The image shows a portion of the Vatican City, an enclave of Rome, Italy that extends from the banks of the Tiber River to the Vatican Hills of western Rome. The wall near the Papal Audience Hall (lower middle) serves as an international boundary around this autonomous and world's smallest state. Also seen (clockwise) in the image is the Apostolic Palace with the Papal apartments; St. Peter's Basilica Square and central obelisk (center); Sistine Chapel, Courtyards of Belvedere and St. Damascus (upper middle); and two of the entrances to the Vatican City State (right)-the Arc of Charlemagne (known as the Arch of the Bells) and the Bronze Doors protected by the Swiss Guard.



(Source: Space Imaging Europe, 05-May-03)


(Source: Space Imaging Europe, 05-May-03)


(Source: Space Imaging Europe, 05-May-03)


(Source: Space Imaging Europe, 05-May-03)

DigitalGlobe is making available to the media 60-centimeter (2-foot) resolution satellite imagery of Vatican City. This image was collected by DigitalGlobe's QuickBird satellite on April 5, 2005. This image shows the long line of mourners waiting to view the Pope's body inside St. Peter's Basilica. The average wait time to view the Pope has been 10 to 12 hours. According to some reports, at least 1.8 million people have filed past the body this week.











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Page last modified: 11-07-2011 03:09:29 ZULU