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X-32 - Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)

X-32 Variants

The JSF must be adaptable for use in several military services.

The U.S. Air Force needs a low-cost, conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) airplane to replace the F-16 and A-10, and to complement the F-22A Raptor. The Air Force plans to buy 1,763 of the aircraft. The conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) variant of the Boeing Joint Strike Fighter minimizes acquisition and life-cycle cost while providing improved mission effectiveness.
  • 22,000-pound class empty weight.
  • 36-foot wingspan, 45-foot length.
  • Internal and external payload capability.
  • Multirole supersonic aircraft.
The U.S. Navy wants a carrier-based strike fighter to complement the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet and to replace the A-6, which already has left the inventory. They need a first-day-of-the-war survivable strike aircraft and plan to purchase 480 JSF. The carrier-based version (CV) of the Boeing JSF provides first-day-of-the-war survivable strike capability combined with outstanding low-speed flight handling characteristics. It has a stronger internal structure, landing gear, and arresting hook designed for catapult launch and arrested landing.
  • 24,000-pound class empty weight.
  • 36-foot wingspan with no wing fold.
  • Internal and external payload capability.
  • Multirole supersonic aircraft.
The U.S. Marine Corps wants a short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft to replace its AV-8B Harrier and F/A-18 Hornet so it can transition to an all-STOVL strike force early in the 21st century. The U.K. Royal Navy and Royal Air Force require a STOVL aircraft to replace their aging Sea Harrier and GR.7, respectively. The Marine Corps is scheduled to acquire 609, while the U. K. Royal Navy will purchase 60 and the Royal Air Force plan to buy 90 aircraft. The short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) variant of the Boeing JSF for the U.S. Marine Corps and U.K. Royal Navy/Air Force employs a direct lift system for short takeoffs and vertical landings with uncompromised up-and-away performance.
  • 22,000-pound class empty weight.
  • 30-foot wing span with no wing folds.
  • Internal and external payload capability.
  • Multirole supersonic aircraft.

Each of these service variants must perform unique missions and flight characteristics, but must also share a high level of commonality to reduce costs. Boeing has embraced optimal commonality, achieving approximately 80% commonality across all three variants.



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Page last modified: 07-07-2011 02:39:35 ZULU