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"Attention! Your attention, please! A newsflash has this moment arrived from the Malabar front. Our forces in South India have won a glorious victory. I am authorized to say that the action we are now reporting may well bring the war within measurable distance of its end."


Malabar

In its narrower application Malabar was the name of a district of India stretching about 145 miles along the west coast, south of Mangalore, in the general region of present-day Kerala. Its chief towns include Cannanore, Tellicheri, Calicut (Kozhikode), and Palghat. In its older, wider, and popular significance the Malabar Coast includes the whole southwest corner of India as far back as the ghaut line. The ancient form of the name was Male, "where the pepper grows", whence the name Malayalam for the prevailing language. In scientific circles today, 'Malabar' is also used on occasion by ecologists when they talk about the tropical and subtropical forests of Kerala. Malabar is famous for its boat building, mangrove estuaries and magnificent sea forts.

The Malabar exercise series was suspended in the wake of the 1998 Pokhran nuclear tests. US-India military cooperation had all but stopped after India's 1998 nuclear tests, which prompted US sanctions and an arms race with neighboring Pakistan, which also tested nuclear weapons that year.

India and US defence ties were on the upswing since December 2001, after the joint Defense Policy Group, a secretarial-level committee of the two defence establishments, was revived. In May 2002, the then defence secretary, Yogendra Narain, visited Washington even as tension on the border with Pakistan was mounting and opened negotiations on an Agreement on Acquisition and Cross-Servicing.

The Indian and US navies revived the Malabar series of exercises n the Arabian Sea from the last week of September 2002. In an increasingly common pairing of U.S. and Indian military forces, the USS Chancellorsville and USS Paul F. Foster completed four days of joint military exercises with their Indian navy counterparts. The two navies participated in the Malabar Exercise for the first time since 1996 - further evidence of the nations' thawing military relationship. The USS Chancellorsville, a 7th Fleet ship from Yokosuka, and the USS Paul F. Foster paired with two Indian ships in a series of missile exercises, crew exchanges and helicopter training operations off India's southwest coast. Indian navy ships involved were the INS Delhi and INS Gomati, two relatively new ships that operated much the same as the Chancellorsville.

Malabar 2003

Malabar 2004

About 2,000 U.S. and Indian navy personnel took part in Malabar 04, a training exercise off the southwest coast of India Oct. 1-9, 2004. Malabar was designed to increase interoperability between the two navies, while enhancing the cooperative security relationship between India and the United States. The Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Cowpens (CG 63), the Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigate USS Gary (FFG 51), the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Alexandria (SSN 757), and P-3C maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft participated from the U.S. side in Malabar. The Indian vessels included the destroyer INS Mysore, frigate INS Brahmaputra, the tanker INS Aditya and the submarine INS Shankul.

The bilateral exercise involved a number of events designed to test the abilities of Sailors on both sides. Some of these included small boat transfers, maneuvering as a group, nighttime underway replenishments, visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) drills, and the central event, a "war at sea."

Malabar 2004 marked the sixth time the Malabar exercises have been conducted. They have been increased in complexity and scope. The Malabar exercises between the Indian and U.S. navies started off at elementary levels of communication checks and basic maneuvers. For Malabar 2004, however, a stage had been reached where the two navies were in a position to exercise in a multi-dimensional and multi-threat scenario with the presence of major combatants, which included destroyers and frigates with integral helicopters, both nuclear and diesel submarines, carrier-borne fighter aircraft and, lastly, maritime patrol aircraft.

Exercise Malabar 05 ended Oct. 3 with a community relations (COMREL) project in Panjim, Goa, India. This year's Malabar exercise is the largest to date. It includes two U.S. destroyers, USS Higgins (DDG 76) and USS Chaffee (DDG 90), the U.S. aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) and the U.S. submarine USS Santa Fe (SSN 763). The Indian Navy has contributed their aircraft carrier INS Viraad, a frigate, a submarine and the new Delhi-class destroyer INS Mysore.

USS Boxer (LHD 4) Expeditionary Strike Group (BOXESG) and the Indian navy's Western Fleet successfully completed Malabar 2006 off the Southwest coast of India Nov. 5. The purpose of the multinational exercise, which focused on a number of naval mission areas, was to strengthen ties between American, Canadian and Indian forces, as well as enhance the cooperative security relationship between the nations involved. The forces worked together in a variety of functional skill areas, including force protection drills, formation steaming, coordinated surface fire support, amphibious landing, live-fire events for attached aircraft, torpedo firing events and anti-submarine warfare training. Thirteen ships participated in the exercise, as well as Marines from the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) (Special Operations Capable) deployed aboard Boxer, and Indian Soldiers assigned to the 9th Battalion of the Sikh Light Infantry. It was the first time a U.S. Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG) led the exercise.

Malabar '06 concluded with a "War-at-Sea" phase, which split the forces into two international blue and gold teams. The blue team simulated a friendly force providing aid to a disaster-stricken nation, while the gold team simulated an enemy force attacking them. During the exercise, both teams tested their response capabilities and ability to work with each other.

Exercise Malabar '07-1 was a bilateral U.S.-Indian Navy training exercise.

More than 20,000 personnel from five different countries participated in Exercise Malabar 07-2. The six-day exercise began Sept. 4 and took place in the Bay of Bengal. This multilateral exercise includes naval forces from India, Australia, Japan, Singapore and the United States. The Malabar exercise series has historically been a bilateral exercise between the Indian and U.S. Navy. This year, the Indian navy invited other regional countries to participate. Exercise Malabar 07-2 was designed to increase ability to operate among the Indian, Australian, Japanese, Singaporean, and U.S. maritime forces to develop common understanding and procedures for maritime operations. Interoperability among maritime forces allows for a more effective capability to respond, as necessary, to maritime threats such as terrorism proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and transnational challenges such as pandemic disease and natural disaster.

Malabar 2008 was a joint exercise between Indian and U.S. navies Oct. 18-22. The Indian ship Rajput class destroyer INS Rana (D 52) led the passing exercise formation. The formation involving the Ronald Reagan Carrier Strike Group and Indian navy's Western Fleet received honors in passing from the Indian flagship INS Mumbi (D 62). The Nimitz-class Aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan led the formation as it received honors in passing by the Indian navy's Western Fleet flagship INS Mumbai (D 62), signifying the completion of the three-day exercise Malabar 08. Malabar was designed to increase cooperation between the Indian and U.S. Navy while enhancing the cooperative security relationship between India and the US.

The Indian Navy, Japan Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF) and US Navy expanded their maritime partnerships during exercise MALABAR 2009, held off the coast of Japan April 29-May 3. Historically, MALABAR was a bilateral engagement between the United States and India, who leads the exercise. This year the Indian Navy invited the JMSDF to participate. Japan last participated in Malabar in 2007. MALABAR included surface, subsurface and air operations, including helicopters from each navy landing and taking off from the other navy's ships.

Ships, submarines and aircraft from the U.S. Navy's 7th Fleet arrived in Goa, India, April 23 to begin exercise Malabar 2010 hosted by the Indian Navy. The activities ranged from fundamental coordination and communication to more advanced and complex strategic naval operations. Training conducted at sea included surface and anti-submarine warfare, coordinated gunnery exercises, air defense and visit, board, search and seizure drills. US forces participating in Malabar will include the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Shiloh (CG 67), Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS Lassen (DDG 82) and USS Chafee (DDG 90), Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Curts (FFG 38), Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Annapolis (SSN 760), P-3 Orion aircraft, SH-60 helicopters and a Sea, Air and Land (SEAL) special forces detachment.

The United States and Indian navies officially started operations marking the beginning of the joint exercise Malabar 2011, April 2. The ships participating in this year's Malabar exercise include Rueben James, the destroyers Stethem and USS Sterett (DDG 104), and a nuclear powered attack submarine. Indian navy ships include fuel tanker INS Jyoti (A 58), guided-missile corvette INS Kirch (P62), and the destroyers Delhi, Ranvijay, and INS Ranvir (D54).

Naval personnel from India and the United States participated in Exercise Malabar 2012, April 9-16, 2012. Participants from the U.S. Navy included the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), the guided-missile cruiser USS Bunker Hill (CG 52), the guided-missile destroyer USS Halsey (DDG 97), a logistics ship, P-3C aircraft and a submarine. The exercise featured both ashore and at-sea training. While ashore in Chennai, India, training included subject matter expert and professional exchanges on counter-piracy operations, carrier aviation operations, maritime patrol and reconnaissance operations and anti-submarine warfare operations.

The at-sea portions were conducted in two phases. Phase I will be conducted in the vicinity of Chennai while Phase II was conducted in the Bay of Bengal and west of the Nicobar Islands. They were designed to advance participating nations military-to-military coordination and capacity to plan and execute tactical operations in a multinational environment.

Naval forces from India and the United States participated in exercise Malabar 2013, Nov. 5 - 11. The exercise featured both ashore and at-sea training. While ashore in Chennai, India, training included subject matter expert and professional exchanges on maritime patrol and reconnaissance operations and anti-submarine warfare operations. The at-sea portions were conducted in the Bay of Bengal. They were designed to advance coordination and capacity to plan and execute tactical operations in a multinational environment.

Naval forces from India, Japan and the United States participated in exercise Malabar 2014, July 24 - 30. Malabar is a complex, high-end warfighting exercise that has grown in scope and complexity over the years. Malabar 2014 was the latest in a continuing series of exercises conducted to advance multinational maritime relationships and mutual security issues. The exercise featured both ashore and at-sea training.

The at-sea portions were conducted in the waters south of Japan. They were designed to advance participating nations mil-to-mil coordination and capacity to plan and execute tactical operations in a multi-national environment. While ashore in Sasebo, Japan, training included subject matter expert and professional exchanges on carrier strike group operations; maritime patrol and reconnaissance operations; anti-piracy operations; and visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) operations.

The aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71), Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1, Normandy, Freedom-class littoral combat ship USS Fort Worth (LCS 3), Los Angeles-class submarine USS Corpus Christi (SSN 705), the Japanese Akizuki-class destroyer JS Fuyuzuki (DD 108), the Indian Navy Brahmaputra-class guided-missile frigate INS Betwa (F 39), the Rajput-class destroyer INS Ravijay (D 55), the Sindhughosh-class diesel-electric submarine INS Sindhuraj (S 57), INS Shivalik and INS Shakti were all participants in Exercise Malabar 2015.

The tri-lateral exercise Malabar 2015 came to a close as Indian, Japanese and U.S. naval forces completed training, 19 October 2015. The annual high-end war fighting exercise, which began in 1992, featured maritime patrol and reconnaissance operations, surface and anti-submarine warfare, air defense exercises (ADEX) and visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) operations. The ashore portion of the exercise featured information exchanges from professionals and subject-matter experts on a wide variety of military operations including helicopter operations, maritime patrol and reconnaissance operations, damage control, carrier strike group operations and explosive ordnance disposal.

Japan joined the US and India for the Malabar Joint Naval Exercise to be held in the Western Pacific. The South China Sea issue was in the limelight as India, the US and Japan are set to hold a trilateral naval exercise in the Western Pacific Ocean off the east coast of Okinawa. The trilateral exercise started on 10 June 2016 and ran through June 17, and was intended to strengthen naval ties between India, the US and Japan amid militarization of South China Sea by China.

Naval ships, aircraft and personnel from Australia, India, Japan, and the United States began exercise Malabar 2020 in the Bay of Bengal, 03 November 2020. Hosted by the Indian Navy (IN), this year marks the 24th iteration of Exercise Malabar, which began in 1992 and will feature the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) as they rejoin the exercise. The annual exercise advances the planning, integration and employment of advanced warfare tactics between participating nations. The U.S. participant is the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain (DDG 56). Participants include Indian Navy Ships Shakti (A57), Ranvijay (D55), Shivalik (F47), and submarine Sindhuraj (S57), with various aircraft from the Indian Navy, HMAS Ballarat (FFG 155), from the RAN, and JS Onami (DD 111) from the JMSDF.



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Page last modified: 29-04-2021 11:32:53 ZULU